Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (18 September 2023) | Viewed by 13797

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece
Interests: orthopaedic surgery; knee arthroplasty; hip arthroplasty; revision surgery; complex joint reconstruction; hand surgery
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Guest Editor
1. Arthroscopy and Orthopaedic Surgery Department, Metropolitan Hospital, Neo Faliro, Athens, Greece
2. Stavros Niarchos Foundation Complex Joint Reconstruction Center, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA
Interests: arthroscopy; knee arthroplasty; hip arthroplasty; joint reconstruction; revision surgery; complex joint reconstruction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The present Special Issue focuses on current surgical options for treatment in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. With constant advances in healthcare and medicine, new treatments have been refined for use in orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. These available options, which mostly relate to the surgical or interventional treatment of patients, are generally used in conjunction with or after conservative treatment for various conditions.

We aim to collect studies (original research, reviews, or case reports) of high quality relating to surgical treatment of both reconstructive surgery and orthopaedic trauma. Our purpose is to provide an Issue that will cover surgical treatments in most areas of orthopaedic surgery and traumatology, along with potential complications. Eventually, we aspire to enrich the literature with useful knowledge and facilitate the exchange of that knowledge among the scientific community regarding this topic.

Dr. Ioannis Gkiatas
Dr. Dimitrios A. Flevas
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (12 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2417 KiB  
Article
Cyclic Stability of Locking Plate Augmented with Intramedullary Polymethyl Methacrylate (PMMA) Strut Fixation for Osteoporotic Humeral Fractures: A Biomechanical Study
by Chih-Kun Hsiao, Yen-Wei Chiu, Hao-Yuan Hsiao, Yi-Jung Tsai, Cheng-Hung Lee, Cheng-Yo Yen and Yuan-Kun Tu
Life 2023, 13(11), 2110; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13112110 - 24 Oct 2023
Viewed by 761
Abstract
The locking plate may provide improved fixation in osteoporotic bone; however, it has been reported to fail due to varus collapse or screw perforation of the articular surface, especially in osteoporotic bone with medial cortex comminution. Using bone graft as an intramedullary strut [...] Read more.
The locking plate may provide improved fixation in osteoporotic bone; however, it has been reported to fail due to varus collapse or screw perforation of the articular surface, especially in osteoporotic bone with medial cortex comminution. Using bone graft as an intramedullary strut together with plate fixation may result in a stronger construct. However, the drawbacks of bone grafts include limited supply, high cost, and infection risk. PMMA (so-called bone cement) has been widely used for implant fixation due to its good mechanical properties, fabricability, and biocompatibility. The risk of donor-site infection and the drawbacks of allografting may be overcome by considering PMMA struts as alternatives to fibular grafts for humeral intramedullary grafting surgeries. However, the potential effects of intramedullary PMMA strut on the dynamic behaviour of osteoporotic humerus fractures remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the influence of an intramedullary PMMA strut on the stability of unstable proximal humeral fractures in an osteoporotic synthetic model. Two fixation techniques, a locking plate alone (non-strut group) and the same fixation augmented with an intramedullary PMMA strut (with-strut group), were cyclically tested in 20 artificial humeral models. Axially cyclic testing was performed to 450 N for 10,000 cycles, intercyclic motion, cumulated fragment migration, and residual deformation of the constructs were determined at periodic cyclic intervals, and the groups were compared. Results showed that adding an intramedullary PMMA strut could decrease 1.6 times intercyclic motion, 2 times cumulated fracture gap migration, and 1.8 times residual deformation from non-strut fixation. During cycling, neither screw pull-out, cut-through, nor implant failure was observed in the strut-augmented group. We concluded that the plate-strut mechanism could enhance the cyclic stability of the fixation and minimize the residual displacement of the fragment in treating osteoporotic proximal humeral unstable fractures. The PMMA strut has the potential to substitute donor bone and serve as an intramedullary support when used in combination with locking plate fixation. The intramedullary support with bone cement can be considered a solution in the treatment of osteoporotic proximal humeral fractures, especially when there is medial comminution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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14 pages, 6934 KiB  
Article
Restoration of Hip Geometry after Femoral Neck Fracture: A Comparison of the Femoral Neck System (FNS) and the Dynamic Hip Screw (DHS)
by Marcel Niemann, Tazio Maleitzke, Markus Jahn, Katharina Salmoukas, Karl F. Braun, Frank Graef, Ulrich Stöckle and Sebastian Meller
Life 2023, 13(10), 2073; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102073 - 17 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1083
Abstract
Background: The femoral neck system (FNS) was introduced as a minimally invasive fixation device for managing femoral neck fractures. Objective: To compare radiographic, clinical, and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) of femoral neck fracture patients following FNS compared to dynamic hip screw (DHS) implantation [...] Read more.
Background: The femoral neck system (FNS) was introduced as a minimally invasive fixation device for managing femoral neck fractures. Objective: To compare radiographic, clinical, and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) of femoral neck fracture patients following FNS compared to dynamic hip screw (DHS) implantation combined with an anti-rotational screw. Methods: Patients who underwent closed reduction and internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture between 2020 and 2022 were retrospectively included. We measured leg length, femoral offset, and centrum–collum–diaphyseal (CCD) angle in plain radiographs. Scar length, Harris Hip Score, short-form health survey 36-item score (SF-36), and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) were assessed during follow-up visits. Results: We included 43 patients (22 females) with a median age of 66 (IQR 57, 75). In both groups, leg length differences between the injured and the contralateral side increased, and femoral offset and CCD angle differences were maintained over time. FNS patients had shorter scars and reported fewer emotional problems and more energy. There were no differences between groups regarding the remaining SF-36 sub-scores, Harris Hip Score, and NRS. Conclusions: The FNS allows for a comparable leg length, femoral offset, and CCD angle reconstruction while achieving similarly high functional and global health scores to the DHS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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10 pages, 605 KiB  
Article
Who, When, Why?—Traumatological Patients in the Emergency Department of a Maximum Care Provider
by Jason-Alexander Hörauf, Cora Rebecca Schindler, Nils Mühlenfeld, Julian Zabel, Philipp Störmann, Ingo Marzi, Nicolas Söhling and René Danilo Verboket
Life 2023, 13(10), 2046; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102046 - 12 Oct 2023
Viewed by 542
Abstract
Nationwide, there is an annual increase in the number of patients in German emergency departments resulting in a growing workload for the entire emergency department staff. Several studies have investigated the situation in emergency departments, most of which were interdisciplinary, but there are [...] Read more.
Nationwide, there is an annual increase in the number of patients in German emergency departments resulting in a growing workload for the entire emergency department staff. Several studies have investigated the situation in emergency departments, most of which were interdisciplinary, but there are no data on a solely traumatological patient population. The present study therefore aims to investigate the situation in a university-based trauma surgery emergency department. A total of 8582 traumatological patients attending a university hospital from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2019 were studied. Various variables, such as reason for presentation, time of accident, diagnosis, and diagnostic as well as therapeutic measures performed were analyzed from the admission records created. The mean age was 36.2 years, 60.1% were male, 63.3% presented on their own to the emergency department, and 41.2% presented during regular working hours between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The most common reason for presentation was outdoor falls at 17.4%, and 63.3% presented to the emergency department within the first 12 h after the sustained trauma. The most common diagnosis was bruise (27.6%), and 14.2% of patients were admitted as inpatients. Many of the emergency room patients suffered no relevant trauma sequelae. In order to reduce the number of patients in emergency rooms in the future, existing institutions in the outpatient emergency sector must be further expanded and effectively advertised to the public. In this way, the emergency medical resources of clinics, including staff, can be relieved to provide the best possible care for actual emergency patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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14 pages, 3065 KiB  
Article
Surgical Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis with the ApiFix Minimal Invasive Dynamic Correction System—A Preliminary Report of a 24-Month Follow-Up
by Susanne Froehlich, Wolfram Mittelmeier, Biren Desai, Subash Jung Pandey, Herbert Raddatz, Bjoern Lembcke, Annett Klinder and Katrin Osmanski-Zenk
Life 2023, 13(10), 2032; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102032 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1304
Abstract
Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional growth disorder. Corrective surgical procedures are the recommended treatment option for a thoracic angle exceeding 50° and a lumbar major curve of 40°. Over the past few years, dynamic growth modulation implants have been developed as [...] Read more.
Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a three-dimensional growth disorder. Corrective surgical procedures are the recommended treatment option for a thoracic angle exceeding 50° and a lumbar major curve of 40°. Over the past few years, dynamic growth modulation implants have been developed as alternatives to permanent fusion. The ApiFix system was designed as a 2D “posterior dynamic device” for curve correction. After implantation in a minimally invasive procedure, it uses polyaxial joints and a self-adjusting rod to preserve the degree of motion and to accommodate the patient’s growth. It provides an effective method of controlling deformity and fills the gap between the conservative treatment of major curves that are >35° and the fusion procedure. The objective of the two-center cohort study was the analysis of the correction results of patients, who underwent surgical intervention with the ApiFix system. The inclusion criteria were AIS, Lenke type 1 or type 5, a major curve on bending films of ≤30°, and an angle of the major curve of between 35° and 60°. Postoperative radiograph data were obtained longitudinally for up to 24 months of follow-up and compared to preoperative (preop) values. For comparisons of the different time points, non-parametric tests (Wilcoxon) or paired t-tests for normally distributed values were used to analyze repeated measures. Overall, 36 patients (25 female and 11 male) were treated with the ApiFix system from April 2018 to October 2020. Lenke type 1 was identified in 21 (58%) cases and Lenke type 5 was identified in 15 (42%) cases. The average angle of the thoracic major curve for Lenke 1 was 43°. The preoperative lumbar major curve (Lenke 5) was determined to be 43°. Over a follow-up of 24 months, a correction of the major curve to an average of 20° was observed for Lenke 1 and that to an average of 15° was observed for Lenke 5. Lenke type 1 and type 5 showed significant changes in the major curve over the individual test intervals in the paired comparisons compared to the starting angle (Lenke 1: preop—24 months, 0.002; Lenke 5: preop—24 months, 0.043). Overall, 11 events were recorded in the follow-up period, that required revision surgery. We distinguished between repeated interventions required after reaching the maximum distraction length of the implant due to the continued growth of the patient (n = 4) and complications, such as infections or problems associated with the anchorage of the implant (n = 7). The results from the present cohort revealed a statistically significant improvement in the postoperatively measured angles of the major and minor curves in the follow-up after 24 months. Consequently, the results were comparable to those of the already established vertebral body tethering method. Alignment in AIS via dynamic correction systems in combination with a possible growth modulation has been a treatment alternative to surgical fusing procedures for more than a decade. However, the long-term corrective effect has to be validated in further studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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11 pages, 4109 KiB  
Article
A Novel Tool for Collaborative and Blinded Orthopedic Image Analysis
by Philipp Schippers, Andrea Meurer, Matthias Schnetz, Larissa Ewald, Christian Ruckes, Reinhard Hoffmann and Yves Gramlich
Life 2023, 13(9), 1805; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13091805 - 24 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 652
Abstract
Image analysis plays a central role in orthopedics and research but comes with many challenges, including anonymization, bias, and achieving efficient analyses using multiple independent observers. Appropriate software is still lacking. Tyche is a free online tool that displays images in a random [...] Read more.
Image analysis plays a central role in orthopedics and research but comes with many challenges, including anonymization, bias, and achieving efficient analyses using multiple independent observers. Appropriate software is still lacking. Tyche is a free online tool that displays images in a random order without showing any metadata. Additionally, when using Tyche, observers can store results in the same window, and the final results are immediately visible to the project manager. In this study, we compared results from Tyche with those from a validated tool. One hundred pelvic radiographs were analyzed separately by five orthopedic surgeons using both Tyche and the validated software. Common orthopedic measurement modalities and scores were determined. The methods were compared using intra-class correlations and Fleiss’ kappa coefficients as well as Bland–Altman plots. Significant correlations ranging from r = 0.17 (Kallgren and Lawrence Score) to r = 0.99 (area measurements) were calculated for inter- and intraobserver agreements between the two tools for all measurements. The Bland–Altman plots indicated the non-inferiority of either tool. The images were analyzed significantly faster when Tyche was used. We conclude that Tyche is a valid tool for use in orthopedic image analysis. Tyche could be utilized for determining inter- and intraobserver agreements, in multicenter studies and for score validations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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13 pages, 699 KiB  
Article
Rehabilitation Prognostic Factors following Hip Fractures Associated with Patient’s Pre-Fracture Mobility and Functional Ability: A Prospective Observation Study
by Smaragda Koudouna, Dimitrios S. Evangelopoulos, Michail Sarantis, Efstathios Chronopoulos, Ismene A. Dontas and Spiridon Pneumaticos
Life 2023, 13(8), 1748; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13081748 - 15 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 760
Abstract
Low physical function is associated with poor outcomes in the elderly population suffering from hip fractures. The present study aims to evaluate the prognostic tools for predicting patient recovery after hip fractures and investigate the correlation between the pre-fracture motor and functional statuses. [...] Read more.
Low physical function is associated with poor outcomes in the elderly population suffering from hip fractures. The present study aims to evaluate the prognostic tools for predicting patient recovery after hip fractures and investigate the correlation between the pre-fracture motor and functional statuses. A prospective study was performed, including 80 patients suffering from hip fractures. Patient history, previous falls, the type of fracture and overall survival were evaluated. Patient-reported outcome measures (SF-36, EQ-5D/VAS, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Timed Up and Go (TUG) and Harris Hip Score (HHS)) were monitored before hospital discharge at 6 weeks, and 3, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. Overall, 55% of patients experienced at least one fall, and 46% of them used crutches before the fracture. The average CCI score was 6.9. The SPPB score improved from 1.4 ± 1.3 (1 week) to 4.4 ± 2.1 (48 weeks). A one-year age increase, female sex, and prior history of falls lead to 0.1-, 0.92-, 0.56-fold lower SPPB scores, respectively, at 12 months. The HHS recorded the greatest improvement between 6 and 12 weeks (52.1 ± 14.6), whereas the TUG score continued to improve significantly from 139.1 ± 52.6 s (6 weeks) to 66.4 ± 54 s (48 weeks). The SPPB and performance test can be routinely used as a prognostic tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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Review

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10 pages, 310 KiB  
Review
Heterotopic Ossification around the Elbow Revisited
by Aristeidis-Panagiotis Kontokostopoulos, Ioannis Gkiatas, George I. Vasileiadis, Dimitrios Flevas, Spyridon E. Tsirigkakis, Dimitrios Kosmas, Ioannis Kostas-Agnantis, Emilios Pakos, Ioannis Gelalis and Anastasios Korompilias
Life 2023, 13(12), 2358; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122358 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1042
Abstract
Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the process of ectopic bone formation in the periarticular soft tissues and is usually formed in the elbow, hip and knee joint as a complication of trauma, burns, brain injury or surgical procedures. The development of HO around the [...] Read more.
Heterotopic ossification (HO) is the process of ectopic bone formation in the periarticular soft tissues and is usually formed in the elbow, hip and knee joint as a complication of trauma, burns, brain injury or surgical procedures. The development of HO around the elbow joint can cause a severe limitation of range of motion (ROM) and may affect daily activities of the patient. Treatment of ectopic bone formation around the elbow is a challenge for many surgeons. Non-operative treatment usually fails to restore the ROM of the elbow joint; thus, surgery is necessary to restore the function of the joint. In the past, many surgeons suggested that a delayed excision of HO, until maturation of the ectopic bone, is the best option in order to avoid any possible recurrence. However, many authors now suggest that this delay may lead to complications such as muscular atrophy and formation of soft tissue contractures that can cause a greater impairment of elbow function; thus, early excision is a better option and can better restore the elbow ROM. We performed a literature research of articles that investigated which is the best time of HO excision and we also evaluated if the tethering effect of HO can lead to a greater impairment of the elbow function. We found numerous studies suggesting that a limitation in ROM of the elbow can appear from the tethering of the ectopic bone formation and not only from primary HO. Concerning the HO excision, there were no significant differences between patients who underwent delayed and early excision, concerning the recurrence rate of HO around the elbow. Patients who underwent early excision had better restoration of elbow ROM; thus, early excision, combined with a rehabilitation program, is reported to be the best option for these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
27 pages, 6906 KiB  
Review
Surgical Treatment of Spinal Deformities in Pediatric Orthopedic Patients
by Sebastian Braun, Marco Brenneis, Lukas Schönnagel, Thomas Caffard and Panagiotis Diaremes
Life 2023, 13(6), 1341; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13061341 - 07 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1651
Abstract
Scoliosis and Scheuermann’s disease are common spinal deformities that affect a substantial population, particularly adolescents, often impacting their quality of life. This comprehensive review aims to present a detailed understanding of these conditions, their diagnosis, and various treatment strategies. Through an extensive exploration [...] Read more.
Scoliosis and Scheuermann’s disease are common spinal deformities that affect a substantial population, particularly adolescents, often impacting their quality of life. This comprehensive review aims to present a detailed understanding of these conditions, their diagnosis, and various treatment strategies. Through an extensive exploration of current literature, the review discusses the etiology of these spinal deformities and the use of diagnostic tools such as X-rays and MRI. It further delves into the range of treatment options available, from conservative approaches such as physiotherapy and bracing to more invasive surgical interventions. The review underscores the necessity of an individualized treatment approach, taking into account factors such as the patient’s age, the severity of the curvature, and overall health. This all-encompassing perspective on scoliosis and Scheuermann’s disease will aid in evidence-based decision making in their management with the goal of improving patient outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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Other

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14 pages, 2368 KiB  
Protocol
Comparison between Exercise Program–Foot Orthoses Treatment and Exercise Program Alone after Pilon Fracture Surgery: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial
by Andrei-Daniel Bolovan, Roxana-Ramona Onofrei, Gheorghe-Bogdan Hogea, Ahmed Abu-Awwad, Emil-Adrian Lazarescu, Simona-Alina Abu-Awwad, Alexandra-Roxana Tapardea, Madalina-Ianca Suba and Elena-Constanta Amaricai
Life 2023, 13(11), 2187; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13112187 - 10 Nov 2023
Viewed by 820
Abstract
The management of tibial pilon fractures is challenging and often leads to complications and limitations in ankle function. The study aims to investigate myotonometric parameters and muscle strength of ankle muscles, as well as gait pattern and balance among patients following surgical treatment [...] Read more.
The management of tibial pilon fractures is challenging and often leads to complications and limitations in ankle function. The study aims to investigate myotonometric parameters and muscle strength of ankle muscles, as well as gait pattern and balance among patients following surgical treatment of pilon fractures. The randomized controlled study will analyze the differences between the patients who will follow a 3-month physical exercise program and will wear customized foot orthoses (i.e., customized orthotic arch support insoles) versus patients who will attend only the physical exercise program. For each group, at least 21 patients will be required. The assessment involves four different testing procedures: myotonometry (anterior tibialis, medial and lateral gastrocnemius, and longus peroneus assessed using MyotonPRO), muscle strength testing (ankle dorsiflexors, plantar flexors, and peroneal muscles assessed using MicroFET2 dynamometer), analysis of gait parameters (using Scheinworks treadmill), and double-leg and single-leg balance tests (using K-Force plate). After 3 months, the assessments will record which of the two treatments (physical exercise program with or without wearing customized foot orthoses) has better outcomes in regaining ankle muscle properties and tone, as well as the restoration of gait and balance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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13 pages, 578 KiB  
Systematic Review
Comparison of Resorbable and Non-Resorbable Osteosynthesis Material in Hallux Surgery: A Systematic Review
by Manuel Coheña-Jiménez, Raquel Prieto-Domínguez, Ana Juana Pérez-Belloso, Juan Manuel Muriel-Sánchez, Álvaro Gómez-Carrión and Pedro Montaño-Jiménez
Life 2023, 13(10), 2018; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102018 - 05 Oct 2023
Viewed by 642
Abstract
There are various pathologies that involve the hallux, among which hallux valgus is the most common. When conservative treatment fails, it is necessary to resort to a surgical approach. The fixation elements for osteotomies in the hallux are usually composed of metallic materials; [...] Read more.
There are various pathologies that involve the hallux, among which hallux valgus is the most common. When conservative treatment fails, it is necessary to resort to a surgical approach. The fixation elements for osteotomies in the hallux are usually composed of metallic materials; however, today, there are numerous resorbable materials that offer numerous advantages over conventional materials. In this article, the objective is to analyze the scientific evidence through the systematic analysis of the existing literature in relation to the effectiveness of resorbable versus non-resorbable osteosynthesis material in the surgical correction of hallux deformities and compare the complications as well as the patient satisfaction and quality of life between both fixation methods. A systematic review of the literature available in the PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus databases and 10 studies were included. The documents were chosen following the eligibility and exclusion criteria, including experimental and observational studies evaluated with the Jadad and Newcastle-Ottawa methodological quality scale, respectively. Data were extracted from valid studies for the review, and the variables functionality, pain, angular corrections, complications, satisfaction and quality of life were observed. In conclusion, there is limited scientific evidence regarding the effectiveness of resorbable versus non-resorbable osteosynthesis material in the surgical correction of hallux deformities. All observed variables are similar regardless of the surgical technique and osteosynthesis material used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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11 pages, 508 KiB  
Systematic Review
What Is the Best Treatment of the Femoral Shaft Nonunion after Intramedullary Nailing? A Systematic Review
by Luca Bianco Prevot, Alessandra Nannini, Laura Mangiavini, Andrea Bobba, Sara Buzzi, Federico Sinigaglia and Giuseppe Peretti
Life 2023, 13(7), 1508; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13071508 - 04 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1833
Abstract
Nonunion (NU) is one of the most feared complications of femoral shaft fracture treatment. Femoral shaft fracture treatment is often linked with poor bone stock and reduced bone metabolism. In this paper, the goal is to carefully analyze the best treatment options for [...] Read more.
Nonunion (NU) is one of the most feared complications of femoral shaft fracture treatment. Femoral shaft fracture treatment is often linked with poor bone stock and reduced bone metabolism. In this paper, the goal is to carefully analyze the best treatment options for patients who developed nonunion after the intramedullary nailing of a femoral shaft fracture. A systematic review of the literature available in the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochran library databases was carried out, and 16 studies were included. Exclusion criteria included case reports and case series that do not have data about clinical outcomes or functional outcomes and included fewer than 10 patients. The reviewed data provide evidence for very good results about the treatment of this pathology with exchanging intramedullary nails or the implantation of a plate and screws (general healing rate of 96.3%). Moreover, the data support the utilization of autologous bone graft in order to stimulate the healing process. In conclusion, the choice between these two types of treatment must be guided by the type of pseudarthrosis that the patient presents. Additionally, bone grafting or growth factors promote bone regenerative processes, especially in patients with oligo-atrophic pseudoarthrosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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10 pages, 1317 KiB  
Case Report
De Novo Synovial Chondromatosis following Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report
by Sebastian Braun, Dimitrios A. Flevas, Ruba Sokrab, Robert G. Ricotti, Carolena Rojas Marcos, Andrew D. Pearle and Peter K. Sculco
Life 2023, 13(6), 1366; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13061366 - 10 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1593
Abstract
In this case report, we present a rare case of a female patient who developed pain and swelling after a total knee arthroplasty. An extensive diagnostic workup including serum and synovial testing to rule out infection was performed in addition to advanced imaging [...] Read more.
In this case report, we present a rare case of a female patient who developed pain and swelling after a total knee arthroplasty. An extensive diagnostic workup including serum and synovial testing to rule out infection was performed in addition to advanced imaging including an MRI of the knee, but it was only after an arthroscopic synovectomy that the diagnosis of secondary synovial chondromatosis was confirmed. The purpose of this case report is to highlight the occurrence of secondary synovial chondromatosis as a rare cause of pain and swelling after total knee arthroplasty, thereby assisting clinicians in providing prompt diagnosis, surgical treatment, and efficient recovery in the setting of secondary synovial chondromatosis after total knee arthroplasty. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research)
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