Advances in Food Bioactive and Gut Microbiota Interactions

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmaceutical Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 1228

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Public Health and Health Management, Gannan Medical University, Ganzhou 341000, China
Interests: phenolics; gut microbiota; chronic diseases; diabetes
Spice and Beverage Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Tropical Agricultural Sciences, Wanning 571533, China
Interests: carbohydrate polymers; polysaccharides; gut microbiota; glucose metabolism; obesity; diabetes mellitus; inflammation bowel disease; immune regulation; antioxidant activity
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Interests: gut microbiota modification with a focus on the gut–disease relation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There are trillions of microorganisms in the human gut; they are important components of our physiological ecosystem. The gut is exposed to a constantly changing environment, which has a significant impact on the composition, function and metabolism of the gut microbiota. Diet, antibiotics, pathogens and lifestyle habits can directly or indirectly affect the host's metabolism. Among them, diet is the most significant factor affecting the gut microenvironment. Food bioactives, including polysaccharides, polypeptides and phytochemicals, are important components of a diet. The gut microbiota can respond to the constantly changing food bioactives, thereby promoting the stability of the internal environment. This Special Issue aims to understand the research advances in the interactions between food bioactives and the gut microbiota, thus contributing to the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.

The scope of this Special Issue includes identifying the specific bacteria that biotransforms food bioactives in the gut; identifying the metabolites of food bioactives and evaluating their bioactivity; the effect of food bioactives on the structure and function of the gut microbiota, and investigating the related health benefits; the mechanism by which metabolites of food bioactives and gut microbiota prevent chronic diseases; design of new delivery systems for enhancing the activity and stability of food bioactives, and targeting release in the colon.

We invite specialists in related research areas to contribute manuscripts to be included in this Special Issue. Please contact the editor before preparing the manuscript for a pre-arrangement of the topic.

Dr. Er Sheng Gong
Dr. Kexue Zhu
Dr. Kun Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phenolics
  • gut microbiota
  • chronic diseases
  • metabolism

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

22 pages, 911 KiB  
Review
Gut Microbiota Modulators Based on Polyphenols Extracted from Winery By-Products and Their Applications in the Nutraceutical Industry
by Laura-Dorina Dinu and Emanuel Vamanu
Life 2024, 14(3), 414; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14030414 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 955
Abstract
Vine-growing for the production of wine is one of the oldest and most important agricultural activities worldwide, but the winemaking process leads to vast amounts of waste. Viticulture and vinification by-products have many bioactive molecules, including polyphenols, prebiotic fibers, organic acids, and minerals. [...] Read more.
Vine-growing for the production of wine is one of the oldest and most important agricultural activities worldwide, but the winemaking process leads to vast amounts of waste. Viticulture and vinification by-products have many bioactive molecules, including polyphenols, prebiotic fibers, organic acids, and minerals. While research on the specific human health effects of grapevine residues (pomace, seeds, barks, stalks, canes, and leaves) is still ongoing, the available data suggest the potential to positively modulate the normal and dysbiotic gut microbiota (GM) using polyphenol-rich extracts obtained from winery by-products. This review provides an updated summary of the in vitro and in vivo evidence in animal models and humans concerning the ability of polyphenol-rich winery residue to be used as a GM modulator that supports their nutraceutical applications as a functional ingredient. Additionally, this review aims to enhance interest in viticulture waste (grapevine stems and leaves), as the levels of polyphenols are similar to those found in red grapes or seeds. However, more research is still needed to obtain innovative products. The valorization of winery residues is not only environmentally friendly; it can also be economically beneficial, creating added-value nutraceuticals that modulate microbiota and a new revenue stream for wine producers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Food Bioactive and Gut Microbiota Interactions)
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