Dermatology: Inflammatory Disorders and Future Perspectives

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 4290

Special Issue Editor

Section of Dermatology, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini 5, 80131 Naples, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; biologics: inflammatory skin diseases; atopic dermatitis; small molecules
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several inflammatory skin conditions can be distinguished, such as acne, rosacea, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, chronic wounds, blistering disease, etc. Although these inflammatory disorders may be grouped under the single heading of inflammatory skin disorders, there are many different molecular pathways involved, including multiple soluble mediators and cellular receptors as well as signaling molecules. Recently, new knowledge on the pathogenesis of cutaneous inflammatory diseases as well as the COVID-19 pandemic period completely revolutionized daily clinical practice. This Special Issue calls for original research and full reviews that address the progress in and current knowledge on the overlapping research topics of inflammatory skin conditions. These include but are not limited to the fields mentioned in the keywords. Moreover, manuscripts investigating the impact of COVID-19 on the management of these inflammatory conditions are welcome.

Dr. Luca Potestio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • psoriasis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • acne
  • rosacea
  • COVID-19
  • inflammatory skin diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 575 KiB  
Article
Impact of Blood-Count-Derived Inflammatory Markers in Psoriatic Disease Progression
by Oana Mirela Tiucă, Silviu Horia Morariu, Claudia Raluca Mariean, Robert Aurelian Tiucă, Alin Codrut Nicolescu and Ovidiu Simion Cotoi
Life 2024, 14(1), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010114 - 12 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 825
Abstract
Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated disease, linked to local and systemic inflammation and predisposing patients to a higher risk of associated comorbidities. Cytokine levels are not widely available for disease progression monitoring due to high costs. Validated low-cost and reliable markers are needed [...] Read more.
Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated disease, linked to local and systemic inflammation and predisposing patients to a higher risk of associated comorbidities. Cytokine levels are not widely available for disease progression monitoring due to high costs. Validated low-cost and reliable markers are needed for assessing disease progression and outcome. This study aims to assess the reliability of blood-count-derived inflammatory markers as disease predictors and to identify prognostic factors for disease severity. Patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. Patients were divided into three study groups according to disease severity measured by the Body Surface Area (BSA) score: mild, moderate, and severe psoriasis. White blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), derived neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (d-NLR), systemic immune index (SII), systemic inflammation response index (SIRI), and aggregate index of systemic inflammation (AISI) positively were correlated with disease severity (p < 0.005). d-NLR, NLR, and SII are independent prognostic factors for mild and moderate psoriasis (p < 0.05). d-NLR is the only independent prognostic factor for all three study groups. Moderate psoriasis is defined by d-NLR values between 1.49 and 2.19. NLR, PLR, d-NLR, MLR, SII, SIRI, and AISI are useful indicators of systemic inflammation and disease severity in psoriasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dermatology: Inflammatory Disorders and Future Perspectives)
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Review

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21 pages, 1434 KiB  
Review
Regulatory T Cell-Targeted Immunomodulatory Therapy for Long-Term Clinical Improvement of Atopic Dermatitis: Hypotheses and Perspectives
by Dong-Ho Nahm
Life 2023, 13(8), 1674; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13081674 - 01 Aug 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2035
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by itching and eczematous lesions. It is often associated with a personal or familial history of allergic diseases. Allergic inflammation induced by immunoglobulin E and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cell responses to [...] Read more.
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronically relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by itching and eczematous lesions. It is often associated with a personal or familial history of allergic diseases. Allergic inflammation induced by immunoglobulin E and T-helper type 2 (Th2) cell responses to common environmental agents has been suggested to play an essential role in AD pathogenesis. The standard therapies for AD, including topical or systemic agents, focus on controlling skin inflammation. Recently developed monoclonal antibody to interleukin-4 receptor alpha or Janus kinase inhibitors can provide significant clinical improvements in patients with AD by inhibiting Th2 cell-mediated skin inflammation. However, the clinical efficacy of the Th2 cell-targeted therapy is transient and incomplete in patients with AD. Patients with AD are seeking a permanent cure. Therefore, the development of novel immunomodulatory strategies that can improve a long-term clinical outcome and provide a long-term treatment-free clinical remission of AD (disease-modifying therapy) is needed. Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and suppress the development of autoimmune and allergic diseases. This review provides three working hypotheses and perspectives for the treatment of AD by Treg cell activation. (1) A decreased number or function of Treg cells is a critical event that causes the activation of Th2 cells, leading to the development and maintenance of AD. (2) Activation of Treg cells is an effective therapeutic approach for AD. (3) Many different immunomodulatory strategies activating Treg cells can provide a long-term clinical improvement of AD by induction of immune tolerance. The Treg cell-targeted immunomodulatory therapies for AD include allergen immunotherapy, microbiota, vitamin D, polyvalent human immunoglobulin G, monoclonal antibodies to the surface antigens of T cell or antigen-presenting cell, and adoptive transfer of autologous Treg cells or genetically engineered Treg cells expanded in vitro. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dermatology: Inflammatory Disorders and Future Perspectives)
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Other

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8 pages, 1063 KiB  
Case Report
Role of Silver Nitrate Spray for Skin Wound Care in Patients with Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis: Our Experience in 4 Patients
by Jose Dario Martinez, Jesus Alberto Cardenas, Manuel Soria, Luis Manuel Saenz, Kattya Estrada, Sergio Maximo Delgado, Marius-Anton Ionescu, Camelia Busila and Alin Laurentiu Tatu
Life 2023, 13(12), 2341; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122341 - 14 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1080
Abstract
Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are examples of severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) with several international recommendations for global medical management, ranging from pharmacological systemic therapy to skin wound care. There is no defined best management of the [...] Read more.
Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are examples of severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) with several international recommendations for global medical management, ranging from pharmacological systemic therapy to skin wound care. There is no defined best management of the skin wounds in SJS/TEN. The care of wounds is essential to initiate re-epithelialization. Our objective is to improve the cicatrization process, avoiding scarring due to deepening of the wounds, as well as prevent infections, achieve pain control, and avoid loss of serum proteins, fluids, and electrolytes. In this retrospective case series, we highlight the value of systemic therapy and the use of silver nitrate for wound management in four patients with TEN. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dermatology: Inflammatory Disorders and Future Perspectives)
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