Multiple Myeloma: Innovations in Diagnosis and Treatment

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (8 March 2024) | Viewed by 1345

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, the Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo 105-8461, Japan
Interests: multiple myeloma; amyloidosis; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; lymphoma; chemotherapy

E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Hematology&Oncology, Teikyo university school of medicine, Tokyo 173-0003, Japan
Interests: myeloma biology; IMIDs; CRISPR screening; IRF4

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Dokkyo Medical University, Ochigi 321-0293, Japan
Interests: multiple myeloma; AML; immunotherapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiple myeloma remains incurable, even though the development of novel agents, such as proteasome inhibitors (PI), immunomodulatory drugs (IMIDs), and monoclonal antibodies (Moab), has improved survival over the last decade. In recent years, cellular therapy and the Bi-specific T-cell-engaging antibody (Bite) have been able to enhance  prognosis against novel target molecules, including B-cell mature antigen (BCMA) and G-protein-coupled receptor, family C, group 5, member D (GPRC5D).

An important aspect to account for when addressing multiple myeloma is the notion of Minimal Residual Disease (MRD). MRD status could predict clinical outcomes by employing next-generation flow cytometry, which is controversial but could be the optimal option for MRD detection.

Several novel techniques have been developed, such as next-generation sequencing, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT), and mass spectrometry. The immune microenvironment around myeloma cells has been investigated, and it has been revealed that the immune system is suitable for myeloma cells to proliferate and defend against anti-myeloma therapeutics.

In addition, the immune microenvironment worsens from a monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) to smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) and symptomatic multiple myeloma. Early therapeutic intervention for early-stage myeloma may contribute to a longer survival time. Thus, eradicating MRD and the reconstitution of the immune microenvironment are both key to enhancing clinical outcomes for myeloma patients.

In this Special Issue, we welcome the submission of original, high-quality research articles and comprehensive reviews that are able to expand our understanding of multiple myeloma, including, but not limited to, cellular therapy, MRD assessment, response-adopted treatment strategy, and the microenvironment, particularly with regard to the immune system.

Dr. Kazuhito Suzuki
Dr. Ryosuke Shirasaki
Dr. Yoichi Imai
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • multiple myeloma
  • anti-myeloma therapeutic
  • transplantation
  • cellular therapy
  • minimal residual disease
  • immune microenvironment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

15 pages, 888 KiB  
Review
IMiD-Free Interval and IMiDs Sequence: Which Strategy Is Better Suited for Lenalidomide-Refractory Myeloma?
by Kazuhito Suzuki and Shingo Yano
Life 2023, 13(11), 2229; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13112229 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1070
Abstract
This review discusses immunomodulatory drug (IMiDs) sequencing and IMiD-free interval strategies for lenalidomide-refractory myeloma. IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) improve clinical outcomes in patients with myeloma; however, refractoriness to lenalidomide, a category of IMiD, predicts poor outcomes. Next-generation IMiDs, such as pomalidomide, are [...] Read more.
This review discusses immunomodulatory drug (IMiDs) sequencing and IMiD-free interval strategies for lenalidomide-refractory myeloma. IMiDs and proteasome inhibitors (PIs) improve clinical outcomes in patients with myeloma; however, refractoriness to lenalidomide, a category of IMiD, predicts poor outcomes. Next-generation IMiDs, such as pomalidomide, are effective even for lenalidomide-refractory myeloma. Therefore, an IMiD-sequencing strategy from lenalidomide to pomalidomide would be desirable. PIs are an antimyeloma therapeutic agent with another mode of action that might restore cereblon, a target of IMiDs; therefore, an IMiD-free interval via class switching from lenalidomide to PIs may be a promising alternative for lenalidomide-refractory myeloma. Additionally, the anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody is a key drug for salvage therapy in anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody-naïve patients. In clinical practice, safety profiles and social convenience can play important roles in the choice of combination therapy. In the future, the selection of optimal treatments should be based on the status of the immunological environment and genetic alterations. This review aims to discuss IMiDs sequencing and IMiD-free interval strategies for lenalidomide- refractory myeloma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Myeloma: Innovations in Diagnosis and Treatment)
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