Knee Osteoarthritis and Photobiomodulation Therapy

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (19 April 2024) | Viewed by 3628

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Interests: knee osteoarthritis; laser therapy

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Guest Editor
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Interests: knee osteoarthritis; physiotherapy; laser therapy

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Medicine and Health, Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
Interests: knee osteoarthritis; photobiomodulation therapy

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Guest Editor
Centre for Pain Research, School of Health, Portland Building, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK
Interests: pain; perception; pain management; analgesia; neuromodulation therapy; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); individuality in pain; pain education; epidemiology of pain; sports-injuries and pain
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the recent osteoarthritis treatment guidelines established by the National Institute of Health Care Excellence (NICE) in the U.K., therapeutic exercise and weight management are recommended alongside drug medication to alleviate pain, including topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (or paracetamol if NSAIDs are contraindicated). NSAIDs and paracetamol are known to have harmful side effects. Those devising these guidelines were unable to recommend electrophysical agents, including acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, or photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT), due to insufficient high-quality clinical trials to evaluate their benefit or harm.

PBMT applies red and near-infrared light over sites of pathology to facilitate tissue healing, reduce inflammation, and relieve pain. PBMT includes low-level laser therapy (LLLT), high-intensity laser therapy (HILT), and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT). It is unclear what the optimal PBMT parameters are. Both LLLT and LEDT have been studied for decades, whereas HILT has only recently become available due to advancements in equipment, and is therefore less studied. The results of a systematic review of randomized placebo-controlled trials indicates that LLLT, at ≥4 J with 785–860 nm wavelength and at ≥1 J with 904 nm wavelength per treatment spot, can reduce pain and disability associated with knee osteoarthritis in humans. Likewise, there is some evidence to support the use of LEDT and HILT.

The purpose of this Special Issue of Life is to disseminate research and catalyze debate on all matters related to the use of PBMT in knee osteoarthritis. We invite you to contribute articles on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, effectiveness, factors influencing response, technological advances, utility, and service delivery. We welcome cell and animal studies, clinical trials, narrative and systematic reviews, and viewpoint articles.

Dr. Martin Bjørn Stausholm
Prof. Dr. Jan Magnus Bjordal
Dr. Roberta Chow
Prof. Mark I. Johnson
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • knee osteoarthritis
  • light-emitting diode therapy
  • low-level laser therapy
  • high-intensity laser therapy
  • photobiomodulation therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2104 KiB  
Article
Comparison between Low-Level and High-Intensity Laser Therapy as an Adjunctive Treatment for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized, Double-Blind Clinical Trial
by Mohd Azzuan Ahmad, Mageswari Moganan, Mohamad Shariff A Hamid, Norhuda Sulaiman, Ushantini Moorthy, Nazirah Hasnan and Ashril Yusof
Life 2023, 13(7), 1519; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13071519 - 6 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2864
Abstract
Background: Low-level (LLLT) and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) can be beneficial additions to knee osteoarthritis (KOA) rehabilitation exercises; however, it is still being determined which electrophysical agent is more effective. Aim: To compare the effects of LLLT and HILT as adjuncts to rehabilitation [...] Read more.
Background: Low-level (LLLT) and high-intensity laser therapy (HILT) can be beneficial additions to knee osteoarthritis (KOA) rehabilitation exercises; however, it is still being determined which electrophysical agent is more effective. Aim: To compare the effects of LLLT and HILT as adjuncts to rehabilitation exercises (LL + EX and HL + EX) on clinical outcomes in KOA. Methods: Thirty-four adults with mild-to-moderate KOA were randomly allocated to either LL + EX or HL + EX (n = 17 each). Both groups underwent their respective intervention weekly for twelve weeks: LL + EX (400 mW, 830 nm, 10 to 12 J/cm2, and 400 J per session) or HL + EX (5 W, 1064 nm, 19 to 150 J/cm2, and 3190 J per session). The laser probe was placed vertically in contact with the knee and moved in a slow-scan manner on the antero-medial/lateral sides of the knee joint. Participants’ Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), active knee flexion, and Timed Up-and-Go test (TUG) were assessed. Results: Post intervention, both groups showed improvements in their KOOS, NPRS, active knee flexion, and TUG scores compared to baseline (p < 0.01). The mean difference of change in KOOS, NPRS, and active knee flexion scores for the HL + EX group surpassed the minimal clinically important difference threshold. In contrast, the LL + EX group only demonstrated clinical significance for the NPRS scores. Conclusions: Incorporating HILT as an adjunct to usual KOA rehabilitation led to significantly higher improvements in pain, physical function, and knee-related disability compared to LLLT applied in scanning mode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Knee Osteoarthritis and Photobiomodulation Therapy)
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