Rhizosphere Microbes and Plant Stress

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 27 February 2024 | Viewed by 1948

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Science, Nanning, China
Interests: biocontrol; biofertilizer; stress management; crop protection; genome analysis; metagenomics; nitrogen fixation; phytohormones
Dr. Pratiksha Singh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Guangxi Key Laboratory for Polysaccharide Materials and Modifications, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, China
Interests: plant pathogenic fungi; plant pathogen interaction; biocontrol; biofertilizer; biotic stress; crop protection; whole genome sequencing; proteomics; nitrogen fixation
Dr. Dao-Jun Guo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Life Sciences and Engineering, Hexi University, Zhangye, China
Interests: plant physiology; biological nitrogen fixation; microbial genomics; metagenomics; transcriptomics, etc.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The widespread use of biofertilizers, undercutting the use of chemical fertilizers, is likely necessary in accomplishing sustainable agriculture production globally. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are chemical-free alternatives to conventional crop protection methods in agriculture. Rhizosphere microbes are unique among the PGPR genera in terms of root colonization; nitrogen fixation; the production of exopolysaccharides, siderophores, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), and phytohormones; the solubilization of phosphorus, potassium, and zinc; biofilm formation; antioxidant activities; stress adaptation abilities; and positive interactions with other microbial communities. They also aid in plant development by promoting biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and as well as by supporting host plant nutrition. A rhizosphere microbe is regarded as an environmentally acceptable alternative to harmful chemical fertilizers because of its active growth-promoting actions. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction between rhizosphere and plant is still less known. A deeper understanding of the PGPR interaction with plants is important for improving the efficiency of PGPR and expanding its application in agriculture.

This Special Issue mainly covers:

  1. Functional biology of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR)
  2. PGPR and plant nutrition
  3. PGPR as a bio-fertilizer
  4. Molecular interaction mechanism of plants to PGPR
  5. Interaction of plants and plant pathogens
  6. Practical application of PGPR in agriculture

Dr. Rajesh Kumar Singh
Dr. Pratiksha Singh
Dr. Dao-Jun Guo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • rhizosphere microbes
  • plant growth promoting rhizobacteria
  • host
  • biocontrol
  • pathogen
  • interaction
  • stresses management
  • nitrogen fertilizer
  • antioxidant enzymes
  • transcriptome and proteome analysis during biotic and abiotic stress conditions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 3863 KiB  
Article
Diversity of Endophytes of Actinidia arguta in Different Seasons
Life 2024, 14(1), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010149 - 19 Jan 2024
Viewed by 604
Abstract
The seasonal changes in environmental conditions can alter the growth states of host plants, thereby affecting the living environment of endophytes and forming different endophytic communities. This study employs Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing to analyze the 16SrRNA and ITS rDNA of endophytes in [...] Read more.
The seasonal changes in environmental conditions can alter the growth states of host plants, thereby affecting the living environment of endophytes and forming different endophytic communities. This study employs Illumina MiSeq next-generation sequencing to analyze the 16SrRNA and ITS rDNA of endophytes in 24 samples of Actinidia arguta stem tissues across different seasons. The results revealed a high richness and diversity of endophytes in Actinidia arguta, with significant seasonal variations in microbial community richness. This study identified 897 genera across 36 phyla for bacteria and 251 genera across 8 phyla for fungi. Notably, 69 bacterial genera and 19 fungal genera significantly contributed to the differences in community structure across seasons. A distinctive feature of coexistence in the endophytic community, both specific and conservative across different seasons, was observed. The bacterial community in winter demonstrated significantly higher richness and diversity compared to the other seasons. Environmental factors likely influence the optimal timing for endophyte colonization. Solar radiation, temperature, precipitation, and relative humidity significantly impact the diversity of endophytic bacteria and fungi. In addition, seasonal variations show significant differences in the nutritional modes of fungal endophytes and the degradation, ligninolysis, and ureolysis functions of bacterial endophytes. This study elucidates the potential role of endophytes in assisting Actinidia arguta in adapting to seasonal changes and provides a theoretical basis for further exploration of functional microbial strains. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizosphere Microbes and Plant Stress)
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15 pages, 6716 KiB  
Article
Changes in the Microbiome of Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrids.) Rhizosphere in Response to Manganese Toxicity
Life 2023, 13(10), 1956; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13101956 - 25 Sep 2023
Viewed by 887
Abstract
Manganese toxicity has limited sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid.) growth and production in acidic soils in south China. The rhizosphere plays an irreplaceable role in plant adaptation to soil abiotic stress, but the responses of the sugarcane rhizosphere to manganese toxicity are still [...] Read more.
Manganese toxicity has limited sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrid.) growth and production in acidic soils in south China. The rhizosphere plays an irreplaceable role in plant adaptation to soil abiotic stress, but the responses of the sugarcane rhizosphere to manganese toxicity are still unknown. We designed pot experiments in Mn-rich acidic soil, collected the sugarcane rhizosphere and bulk soil samples, and then investigated the changes in Mn-related soil parameters and microbiome. The results indicated that the water-soluble and exchangeable manganese concentrations in the sugarcane rhizosphere were significantly lower than that in the bulk soil, which was not associated with soil pH changes. In contrast, the number of bacteria and the activity of peroxidase, sucrase, urease, and laccase in the rhizosphere were significantly higher. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that the bacterial diversity and quantity along with the abundance of Proteobacteria in the rhizosphere were significantly higher than in the bulk soil, while the abundance of Acidobacteria was lower than in the bulk soil. The soil laccase activity and the number of bacteria decreased significantly with the increase in the manganese toxicity stress. Finally, the relative abundance of proteins associated with manganese transportation and oxidation was significantly higher in the rhizosphere soil. In summary, the Mn-induced response of the rhizosphere is an important mechanism in sugarcane adaptation to manganese toxicity in acidic soil. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Rhizosphere Microbes and Plant Stress)
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