Cereals: Stress Resistance and Breeding

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 1702

Special Issue Editor

Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Shanghai, China
Interests: salt stress; drought stress; nitrogen use efficiency; transcriptome analysis; genetic diversity; molecular marker-assisted selection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the recent climate change, extreme weather events are more frequent and more severe, causing serious impacts on crop yield and quality. As we know, cereal crops play important roles in global food security, hence improving their stress tolerance to these adverse environments will contribute to their high and stable yields. The breeding of stress-tolerant varieties will also make an important contribution to the global food supply. However, the molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance are still not very clear in cereals, and there are not many reports on successful examples of stress tolerance breeding.

This Special Issue will provide more opportunities for scientists to introduce their latest results and research ideas, thereby providing inspirations for breeders to speed cereal crop breeding with stress tolerance. The Special Issue “Cereals: Stress Resistance and Breeding” will be open for submissions.

Dr. Zhiwei Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • salt stress
  • drought stress
  • nitrogen use efficiency
  • transcriptome analysis
  • genetic diversity
  • molecular marker-assisted selection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 2741 KiB  
Article
Molecular Genetic Diversity of Local and Exotic Durum Wheat Genotypes and Their Combining Ability for Agronomic Traits under Water Deficit and Well-Watered Conditions
Life 2023, 13(12), 2293; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122293 - 01 Dec 2023
Viewed by 736
Abstract
Water deficit poses significant environmental stress that adversely affects the growth and productivity of durum wheat. Moreover, projections of climate change suggest an increase in the frequency and severity of droughts, particularly in arid regions. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop [...] Read more.
Water deficit poses significant environmental stress that adversely affects the growth and productivity of durum wheat. Moreover, projections of climate change suggest an increase in the frequency and severity of droughts, particularly in arid regions. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop drought-tolerant and high-yielding genotypes to ensure sustained production and global food security in response to population growth. This study aimed to explore the genetic diversity among local and exotic durum wheat genotypes using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and, additionally, to explore the combining ability and agronomic performance of assessed durum wheat genotypes and their 28 F1 crosses under normal and drought stress conditions. The investigated SSRs highlighted and confirmed the high genetic variation among the evaluated parental durum wheat genotypes. These diverse eight parental genotypes were consequently used to develop 28 F1s through a diallel mating design. The parental durum genotypes and their developed 28 F1s were assessed under normal and drought stress conditions. The evaluated genotypes were analyzed for their general and specific combining abilities as well as heterosis for agronomic traits under both conditions. The local cultivar Bani-Suef-7 (P8) is maintained as an effective combiner for developing shortened genotypes and improving earliness. Moreover, the local cultivars Bani-Suef-5 (P7) and Bani-Suef-7 (P8) along with the exotic line W1520 (P6) demonstrated excellent general combining ability for improving grain yield and its components under drought stress conditions. Furthermore, valuable specific hybrid combinations, W988 × W994 (P1 × P2), W996 × W1518 (P3 × P5), W1011 × W1520 (P4 × P6), and Bani-Suef-5 × Bani-Suef-7 (P7 × P8), were identified for grain yield and its components under drought stress conditions. The assessed 36 genotypes were grouped according to tolerance indices into five clusters varying from highly drought-sensitive genotypes (group E) to highly drought-tolerant (group A). The genotypes in cluster A (two crosses) followed by thirteen crosses in cluster B displayed higher drought tolerance compared to the other crosses and their parental genotypes. Subsequently, these hybrids could be considered valuable candidates in future durum wheat breeding programs to develop desired segregants under water-deficit conditions. Strong positive relationships were observed between grain yield and number of grains per spike, plant height, and 1000-grain weight under water-deficit conditions. These results highlight the significance of these traits for indirect selection under drought stress conditions, particularly in the early stages of breeding, owing to their convenient measurability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cereals: Stress Resistance and Breeding)
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Review

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11 pages, 771 KiB  
Review
Advances in Identifying the Mechanisms by Which Microorganisms Improve Barley Salt Tolerance
Life 2024, 14(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010006 - 19 Dec 2023
Viewed by 587
Abstract
As the global human population continues to increase, the use of saline–alkali land for food production is an important consideration for food security. In addition to breeding or cultivating salt-tolerant crop varieties, microorganisms are increasingly being evaluated for their ability to improve plant [...] Read more.
As the global human population continues to increase, the use of saline–alkali land for food production is an important consideration for food security. In addition to breeding or cultivating salt-tolerant crop varieties, microorganisms are increasingly being evaluated for their ability to improve plant salt tolerance. Barley is one of the most important and salt-tolerant cereal crops and is a model system for investigating the roles of microorganisms in improving plant salt tolerance. However, a comprehensive review of the mechanisms by which microorganisms improve barley salt tolerance remains lacking. In this review, the mechanisms of barley salt tolerance improvement by microorganisms are summarized, along with a discussion of existing problems in current research and areas of future research directions. In particular, with the development of sequencing technology and the great reduction of prices, the use of omics can not only comprehensively evaluate the role of microorganisms but also evaluate the impact of the microbiome on plants, which will provide us with many opportunities and challenges in this research area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cereals: Stress Resistance and Breeding)
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