Abiotic Stress in Horticultural Plant: Insight into Recent Advances in the Underlaying Tolerance Mechanism

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 May 2023) | Viewed by 4216

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Horticulture, Hainan University, Haikou 570228, China
Interests: antioxidant enzymes; abiotic stress; heavy metal stress; ROS; RNS; plant physiology; plant molecular biology; oxidative stress; ascorbate-glutathione; phytohormones; stress mitigant; plant stress tolerance
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Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technology, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800, Pakistan
Interests: vegetables science; stress physiology; abiotic stress; photosynthesis
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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: plant biology; plant stress physiology; plant resistance against different stresses; abiotic and biotic stresses; heavy metal stresses; phytohormones; plant autophagy; plant biotechnology; plant genome editing; CRISPR/Cas9; nanoparticles; plant-bacteria interaction
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Guest Editor
1. Agro-Industrial Chemistry Laboratory (LCA), University of Toulouse, 31030 Toulouse, France
2. Biological Engineering Department, Paul Sabatier University, 32000 Auch, France
Interests: cereals; oilseed crop; plant physiology; plant breeding; abiotic stress; bioactives accumulation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The current status of the changing climate has become a significant threat to the global production of horticultural crops. To feed the larger part of the world’s growing population, the agricultural output needs to be boosted by 70 percent by the midcentury in order to potentially supplement about an extra 2.3 billion people. Additionally, horticultural crop production is significantly affected by the changing climatic conditions. One of the most critical issues for plant biologists and agronomists is how plants respond to different environmental stimuli. Drought, salt, and high temperatures are the most common environmental stresses that significantly affect plant growth and development. Traditional breeding methods have had minimal effectiveness due to the complexity of stress tolerance characteristics. To meet the world’s increasing food demand, it is necessary to develop new and effective methods in this area. Phytohormones (different stress mitigants) might act as a realistic option for producing climate-resilient crops with high yields.

          This Special Issue focuses on the effects of abiotic stress on horticultural crops in morphological, physiological, and biochemical processes. Alleviation strategies powered by plant adaptation and acclimation mechanisms, as well as cultivar tolerance, are all within the scope of this Special Issue. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. 

Suggested themes (but not limited to only these):

  1. Current interventions in physiological and biochemical responses and mechanisms of abiotic stress in horticultural crops;
  2. Signalling mechanisms and pathways involved in the regulation of stress responses;
  3. Phytohormonal cross-talk and associated mecahnisms under abiotic stress conditions;
  4. Application of noval phytoprotectants in mitigation of stresses in horticultural crops;
  5. Mechanistic insight into PGPR-mediated regulation of abiotic stress conditions.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Muhammad Ahsan Altaf
Dr. Safina Naz
Dr. Hakim Manghwar
Dr. Othmane Merah
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • phytohormones
  • abiotic stress
  • antioxidant response
  • oxidative stress
  • plant physiology
  • molecular biology
  • horticultural plants
  • food security
  • tolerance mechanism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 4015 KiB  
Article
Effects of Fogging System and Nitric Oxide on Growth and Yield of ‘Naomi’ Mango Trees Exposed to Frost Stress
by Hosny F. Abdel-Aziz, Ashraf E. Hamdy, Ahmed Sharaf, Abd El-wahed N. Abd El-wahed, Ibrahim A. Elnaggar, Mahmoud F. Seleiman, Magdy Omar, Adel M. Al-Saif, Muhammad Adnan Shahid and Mohamed Sharaf
Life 2023, 13(6), 1359; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13061359 - 9 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1514
Abstract
In years with unfavorable weather, winter frost during the blossoming season can play a significant role in reducing fruit yield and impacting the profitability of cultivation. The mango Naomi cultivar Mangifera indica L. has a low canopy that is severely affected by the [...] Read more.
In years with unfavorable weather, winter frost during the blossoming season can play a significant role in reducing fruit yield and impacting the profitability of cultivation. The mango Naomi cultivar Mangifera indica L. has a low canopy that is severely affected by the effects of frost stress. As a result of the canopy being exposed to physiological problems, vegetative development is significantly inhibited. The current investigation aimed to study the influence of spraying nitric oxide and fogging spray systems on Naomi mango trees grafted on ‘Succary’ rootstock under frost stress conditions. The treatments were as follows: nitric oxide (NO) 50 and 100 μM, fogging spray system, and control. In comparison to the control, the use of nitric oxide and a fogging system significantly improved the leaf area, photosynthesis pigments of the leaf, the membrane stability index, yield, and physical and chemical characteristics of the Naomi mango cultivar. For instance, the application of 50 μM NO, 100 μM NO, and the fogging spray system resulted in an increase in yield by 41.32, 106.12, and 121.43% during the 2020 season, and by 39.37, 101.30, and 124.68% during the 2021 season compared to the control, respectively. The fogging spray system and highest level of NO decreased electrolyte leakage, proline content, total phenolic content, catalase (CAT), peroxidases (POX), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) enzyme activities in leaves. Furthermore, the number of damaged leaves per shoot was significantly reduced after the application of fogging spray systems and nitric oxide in comparison to the control. Regarding vegetative growth, our results indicated that the fogging spray system and spraying nitric oxide at 100 μM enhanced the leaf surface area compared to the control and other treatments. A similar trend was noticed regarding yield and fruit quality, whereas the best values were obtained when the fogging spray system using nitric oxide was sprayed at a concentration of 100 μM. The application of fogging spray systems and nitric oxide can improve the production and fruit quality of Naomi mango trees by reducing the effects of adverse frost stress conditions. Full article
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Review

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23 pages, 1895 KiB  
Review
Exogenous Melatonin Spray Enhances Salinity Tolerance in Zizyphus Germplasm: A Brief Theory
by Riaz Ahmad, Meryam Manzoor, Hafiza Muniba Din Muhammad, Muhammad Ahsan Altaf and Awais Shakoor
Life 2023, 13(2), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13020493 - 10 Feb 2023
Cited by 23 | Viewed by 2081
Abstract
Fruit orchards are frequently irrigated with brackish water. Irrigation with poor quality water is also a major cause of salt accumulation in soil. An excess of salts results in stunted growth, poor yield, inferior quality and low nutritional properties. Melatonin is a low [...] Read more.
Fruit orchards are frequently irrigated with brackish water. Irrigation with poor quality water is also a major cause of salt accumulation in soil. An excess of salts results in stunted growth, poor yield, inferior quality and low nutritional properties. Melatonin is a low molecular weight protein that shows multifunctional, regulatory and pleiotropic behavior in the plant kingdom. Recently, its discovery brought a great revolution in sustainable fruit production under salinity-induced environments. Melatonin contributed to enhanced tolerance in Zizyphus fruit species by improving the plant defense system’s potential to cope with the adverse effects of salinity. The supplemental application of melatonin has improved the generation of antioxidant assays and osmolytes involved in the scavenging of toxic ROS. The tolerance level of the germplasm is chiefly based on the activation of the defense system against the adverse effects of salinity. The current study explored the contribution of melatonin against salinity stress and provides information regarding which biochemical mechanism can be effective and utilized for the development of salt-tolerant germplasm in Zizyphus. Full article
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