Trends in Postharvest Technology and Innovation for Perishable Crops

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2023) | Viewed by 1609

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Post-Harvest and Agro-Processing Technologies (PHATs), Agricultural Research Council (ARC) Infruitec-Nietvoorbij, Stellenbosch 7599, South Africa
Interests: mathematical modeling; food waste control; plant physiology; food packaging

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Guest Editor
Africa Institute for Postharvest Technology, Faculty of AgricSciences, Stellenboch University, Stellenbosch 7602, South Africa
Interests: soil; molecular biology; microbiology; biotechnology; food quality; food chemistry; food science and technology; food processing; food analysis; antimicrobials

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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food & the Environment, Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester GL7 6JS, UK
Interests: food security and nutrition; sustainable agriculture; farmer development and technology diffusion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The postharvest losses of agricultural products in the supply chain remain unacceptably high. Global food production has reached a record high in recent years; however, one third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, which is equivalent to 1.3 billion tons. Postharvest loss is a leading cause of food insecurity. Consequently, there is a need for an integrated and innovative approach to reduce the loss in the postharvest system. This system comprises sequences of activities from harvest to treatments, processing, storage, distribution, marketing and consumption. The prevention and reduction of postharvest loss using novel processing and preservation techniques, engineered systems, biotechnology practices and sustainable packaging ensures sustainable supply, marketing and food security.

This Special Issue aims to cover recent trends and innovations related to postharvest technology, emerging processing and preservation techniques, postharvest pathology, big data analysis, as well as the utilization of biotechnology tools in the food system to minimize postharvest loss. This issue therefore seeks contributions from prospective authors in areas including, but not limited to, emerging technologies to maintain the quality and safety of perishables, recent biocontrol systems to prevent postharvest pathology infections, the application of postharvest omics to understand stress responses, and biosensors and big data analysis to quantify the shelf life of perishable commodities.

Dr. Zinash A. Belay
Dr. Oluwafemi James Caleb
Dr. Patricia M.K. Mathabe
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • active and innovative packaging
  • emerging technologies
  • biosensors
  • postharvest omics
  • big data
  • pathology
  • biocontrol
 

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 7161 KiB  
Article
Chemical and Thermal Treatment for Drying Cassava Tubers: Optimization, Microstructure, and Dehydration Kinetics
by Ellyas Alga Nainggolan, Jan Banout and Klara Urbanova
Life 2023, 13(12), 2355; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122355 - 16 Dec 2023
Viewed by 908
Abstract
Perishable commodities like cassava necessitate effective postharvest preservation for various industrial applications. Hence, optimizing pretreatment processes and modeling drying kinetics hold paramount importance. This study aimed to optimize cassava pretreatment using the central composite design of a response surface methodology while also assessing [...] Read more.
Perishable commodities like cassava necessitate effective postharvest preservation for various industrial applications. Hence, optimizing pretreatment processes and modeling drying kinetics hold paramount importance. This study aimed to optimize cassava pretreatment using the central composite design of a response surface methodology while also assessing microstructure and dehydration kinetics. Diverse chemical and thermal pretreatments were explored, encompassing sodium metabisulfite concentrations (0–4% w/w), citric acid concentrations (0–4% w/w), and blanching time (0–4 min). The four investigated responses were moisture content, whiteness index, activation energy (Ea), and effective moisture diffusivity (Deff). Employing five established drying models, suitability was appraised after optimal pretreatment conditions were determined. The findings revealed that moisture content ranged from 5.82 to 9.42% db, whereas the whiteness index ranged from 87.16 to 94.23. Deff and Ea ranged from 5.06 × 10−9 to 6.71 × 10−9 m2/s and 29.65–33.28 kJ/mol, respectively. The optimal pretreatment conditions for dried cassava were identified by optimizing the use of 1.31% citric acid, 1.03% sodium metabisulfite, and blanching time for 1.01 min. The microstructure indicated that particular chemical and thermal pretreatment configurations yielded particles in the shape of circular and elliptical granules. The logarithmic model provided the most accurate description of the dehydration kinetics, with the highest R2 value (0.9859) and the lowest χ2, RSME, and SSE values of 0.0351, 0.0015, and 0.0123, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Trends in Postharvest Technology and Innovation for Perishable Crops)
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