Recent Progress in Animal Tumor Pathology

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 1993

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Neuropathology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Perugia, 06126 Perugia, Italy
Interests: canine meningioma; neuropathology
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Guest Editor
Laboratoire d’Histopathologie, VetAgro Sup, Campus Vétérinaire, 69280 Marcy l'etoile, France
Interests: canine meningioma; oncology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tumors are the main cause of death in dogs, and generally in companion animals. In the last decade, veterinary oncology has greatly developed in terms of histologic diagnosis, the definition of prognostic markers, and understanding of tumor biological behavior. Many efforts are being made to standardize histologic criteria to make diagnosis much more reproducible. A large and continually increasing number of specific markers are being identified, allowing an earlier and less invasive diagnosis. New advanced therapies, including immune therapies, are being developed thanks to new discoveries about tumor growth and development. All this information is often dispersed in the scientific literature, rendering it difficult to spot the novelties and more recent progress in this field. The goal of this Special Issue is thus to collect, in a single issue, the most advanced research on animal tumor pathology and its application to the benefit of animal health.

Dr. Maria Teresa Teresa Mandara
Dr. Sara Belluco
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biomarkers
  • immune checkpoints
  • biological behavior
  • cell culture
  • prognosis
  • therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2929 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Survival of Cellulose Sulphate-Encapsulated Cells and Metronomic Ifosfamide Control Tumour Growth in Pancreatic Cancer Models—A Prelude to Treating Solid Tumours Effectively in Pets and Humans
by Brian Salmons and Walter H. Gunzburg
Life 2023, 13(12), 2357; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122357 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1666
Abstract
Background: The use of encapsulated cells for the in vivo delivery of biotherapeutics is a promising new technology to potentiate the effectiveness of cell-based therapies for veterinary and human application. One use of the technology is to locally activate chemotherapeutics to their short-lived [...] Read more.
Background: The use of encapsulated cells for the in vivo delivery of biotherapeutics is a promising new technology to potentiate the effectiveness of cell-based therapies for veterinary and human application. One use of the technology is to locally activate chemotherapeutics to their short-lived highly active forms. We have previously shown that a stable clone of HEK293 cells overexpressing a cytochrome P450 enzyme that has been encapsulated in immunoprotective cellulose sulphate beads can be implanted near solid tumours in order to activate oxazaphosphorines such as ifosfamide and cyclophosphamide to the tumour-killing metabolite phosphoramide mustard. The efficacy of this approach has been shown in animal models as well as in human and canine clinical trials. In these previous studies, the oxazaphosphorine was only given twice. An analysis of the Kaplan–Meier plots of the results of the clinical trials suggest that repeated dosing might result in a significant clinical benefit. Aims: In this study, we aimed to (i) demonstrate the stable long-term expression of cytochrome P450 from a characterized, transfected cell clone, as well as (ii) demonstrate that one implanted dose of these encapsulated cytochrome P450-expressing cells is capable of activating multiple doses of ifosfamide in animal models. Methodology: We initially used cell and molecular methods to show cell line stability over multiple passages, as well as chemical and biological function in vitro. This was followed by a demonstration that encapsulated HEK293 cells are capable of activating multiple doses of ifosfamide in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer without being killed by the chemotherapeutic. Conclusion: A single injection of encapsulated HEK293 cells followed by multiple rounds of ifosfamide administration results in repeated anti-tumour activity and halts tumour growth but, in the absence of a functioning immune system, does not cause tumour regression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Animal Tumor Pathology)
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