Microbiota in Health and Disease

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 July 2024 | Viewed by 2567

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal
2. FP-I3ID, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal
3. Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: macrophage; inflammatory bowel disease; mycobacteria

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. FP-I3ID, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal
2. Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto, Portugal
3. CIBIO Centro de Investigação em Biodiversidade e Recursos Genéticos—InBIO Laboratório Associado, Vairão, Portugal
Interests: human gut microbiota; food microbiology; food safety and quality; food composition; human nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, microbiota has been shown to strongly influence host metabolism and immunity, greatly impacting human physiology. Understanding the different microbiota groups' role in modulating those processes will open new perspectives towards disease prevention and the development of personalized therapies.

The main aim of the current topic is to collect articles (original research, reviews, and clinical cases) addressing state-of-the-art information on human microbiota and its impact on human well-being and disease. Articles addressing (i) the composition of healthy human microbiota and worldwide population differences, (ii) the impact of diet on microbiota, (iii) disease-associated dysbiosis, (iv) therapies based on personalized microbiota modulation, and (v) the influence of microbiota composition on the success of medical therapies will be welcome and considered for publication.

Dr. Amélia Sarmento
Dr. Catarina Simões
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microbiota
  • microbiome
  • dysbiosis
  • diet
  • metabolism
  • immune regulation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 3217 KiB  
Article
Beyond the Bile: Exploring the Microbiome and Metabolites in Cholangiocarcinoma
by Jungnam Lee, Hanul Kim and Jin-Seok Park
Life 2024, 14(6), 698; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14060698 - 29 May 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) still has a high mortality rate despite improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role of the human microbiome in CCC is poorly understood, and a recent metagenomic analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between microbiome-associated carcinogenesis and CCC. This study [...] Read more.
Introduction: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) still has a high mortality rate despite improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. The role of the human microbiome in CCC is poorly understood, and a recent metagenomic analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between microbiome-associated carcinogenesis and CCC. This study aimed to investigate changes in microbiome composition associated with CCC and its metabolic signature by integrating taxonomic and functional information with metabolomics data and in vitro experimental results. Methods: From February 2019 to January 2021, this study included patients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), both with and without a diagnosis of CCC. Bile samples were collected via endoscopic nasobiliary drainages (ENBD) and subjected to DNA extraction, PCR amplification of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene V3-V4 region, and data analysis using QIIME2. In vitro Carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) proliferation and Annexin V/PI apoptosis assays were performed to investigate the effects of metabolites on CCC cells. Results: A total of 24 patients were included in the study. Bile fluid analysis revealed a significantly higher abundance of Escherichia coli in the CCC group. Alpha diversity analyses exhibited significant differences between the CCC and non-CCC groups, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy metabolic profiling identified 15 metabolites with significant concentration differences; isoleucine showed the most notable difference. In vitro experiments demonstrated that isoleucine suppressed CCC cell proliferation but did not induce apoptosis. Conclusions: This research underlines the significance of biliary dysbiosis and specific bile metabolites, such as isoleucine, in influencing the development and progression of CCC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota in Health and Disease)
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10 pages, 3011 KiB  
Article
Bacteroidales-Specific Antimicrobial Genes Can Influence the Selection of the Dominant Fecal Strain of Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides uniformis from the Gastrointestinal Tract Microbial Community
by Hyunmin Koo and Casey D. Morrow
Life 2024, 14(5), 555; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14050555 - 26 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides uniformis are known to be abundant in the human fecal microbial community. Although these strains typically remain stable over time in humans, disruption of this microbial community following antibiotics resulted in the transient change to new strains suggesting that [...] Read more.
Bacteroides vulgatus and Bacteroides uniformis are known to be abundant in the human fecal microbial community. Although these strains typically remain stable over time in humans, disruption of this microbial community following antibiotics resulted in the transient change to new strains suggesting that a complex, dynamic strain community exists in humans. To further study the selection of dominant fecal microbial strains from the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) community, we analyzed three longitudinal metagenomic sequencing data sets using BLAST+ to identify genes encoding Bacteroidales-specific antimicrobial proteins (BSAP) that have known functions to restrict species-specific replication of B. uniformis (BSAP-2) or B. vulgatus (BSAP-3) and have been postulated to provide a competitive advantage in microbial communities. In the HMP (Human Microbiome Project) data set, we found fecal samples from individuals had B. vulgatus or B. uniformis with either complete or deleted BSAP genes that did not change over time. We also examined fecal samples from two separate longitudinal data sets of individuals who had been given either single or multiple antibiotics. The BSAP gene pattern from most individuals given either single or multiple antibiotics recovered to be the same as the pre-antibiotic strain. However, in a few individuals, we found incomplete BSAP-3 genes at early times during the recovery that were replaced by B. vulgatus with the complete BSAP-3 gene, consistent with the function of the BSAP to specifically restrict Bacteroides spp. The results of these studies provide insights into the fluxes that occur in the Bacteroides spp. GIT community following perturbation and the dynamics of the selection of a dominant fecal strain of Bacteroides spp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota in Health and Disease)
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19 pages, 2040 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Impact of Probiotic Bifidobacterium on Liver Diseases and the Microbiota
by Gabriel Henrique Hizo and Pabulo Henrique Rampelotto
Life 2024, 14(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14020239 - 8 Feb 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1300
Abstract
Recent studies have shown the promising potential of probiotics, especially the bacterial genus Bifidobacterium, in the treatment of liver diseases. In this work, a systematic review was conducted, with a focus on studies that employed advanced Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to [...] Read more.
Recent studies have shown the promising potential of probiotics, especially the bacterial genus Bifidobacterium, in the treatment of liver diseases. In this work, a systematic review was conducted, with a focus on studies that employed advanced Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies to explore the potential of Bifidobacterium as a probiotic for treating liver pathologies such as Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH), Alcoholic Liver Disease (ALD), Cirrhosis, and Hepatocelullar Carcinoma (HCC) and its impact on the microbiota. Our results indicate that Bifidobacterium is a safe and effective probiotic for treating liver lesions. It successfully restored balance to the intestinal microbiota and improved biochemical and clinical parameters in NAFLD, ALD, and Cirrhosis. No significant adverse effects were identified. While more research is needed to establish its efficacy in treating NASH and HCC, the evidence suggests that Bifidobacterium is a promising probiotic for managing liver lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiota in Health and Disease)
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