Integrated Management, Planning, and Policy for Sustainable Landscape Development in Europe

A topical collection in Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

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Editor


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Collection Editor
1. Department of Sustainable Landscape Development, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Seckendorff-Platz 4, 06120 Halle, Germany
2. Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Opole University of Technology, 45758 Opole, Poland
Interests: peri-urban landscape; governance; planning; urban open spaces; ecosystem services
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Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

European land is a scare and not infinite resource that requires care. Pressures on land are related to extension of urban functions such as housing, recreational services, industry and commercial areas, transportation infrastructures, mine, and waste sites. That processes are made visible by dynamic land take, loss of open spaces, and soil sealing, resulting in biodiversity and ecosystem services diminishment. This situation, beyond ecological challenges, generates sociological ones such as hampering accessibility to greenery or the possibility to freely use it.

Integrated land management, planning, and policy offers a unique opportunity to address such challenges in a multilevel way by promoting and developing flexible approaches to protect land and safeguard open spaces. Integrated land management, planning, and policy making can contribute to protection of ecosystem services, biodiversity, and natural and cultural heritages of various landscapes. It can also support sustainable socioeconomic development, as land is also a capital for investment.

Due to permanent transformations of land in Europe, description of new scientific and planning methodologies, research results, and critical thoughts are constantly important for sustainable development of European landscapes. Moreover, experiences from academia need to be constantly transferred to other governance actors, who are directly responsible for land management, planning, and policy making. This can increase their awareness about integrated planning approaches and offer those actors possibilities to grasp new knowledge.

This new collection in the Land journal contributes to the process of intensive knowledge and experience exchange among various experts and practitioners by offering an open platform where a discussion concerning integrated land management, planning, and policy making in the context of various European landscapes can take place. It is open to different types of theoretical analyses, research papers, and practical contributions addressing the overall topic of integrated management, planning, and policy making for sustainable landscape development in Europe. It also aims to collect submissions from European Land-Use Institute (ELI) members. As part of this collaboration, all members of ELI will receive a discount on the article processing charge (APC) when submitting articles to Land. Please choose ELI as your institution when submitting papers to this collection.

Dr. Marcin Spyra
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Published Papers (3 papers)

2023

Jump to: 2022

16 pages, 2999 KiB  
Article
Defining and Regulating Peri-Urban Areas through a Landscape Planning Approach: The Case Study of Turin Metropolitan Area (Italy)
by Enrico Gottero, Federica Larcher and Claudia Cassatella
Land 2023, 12(1), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12010217 - 09 Jan 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2987
Abstract
Peri-urbanization is a global phenomenon strongly linked to socio-demographic and settlement dynamics. Although peri-urbanization is a topic widely debated in academic literature, especially in the field of urban and regional planning, there is no universal definition, and different types and interpretations of peri-urban [...] Read more.
Peri-urbanization is a global phenomenon strongly linked to socio-demographic and settlement dynamics. Although peri-urbanization is a topic widely debated in academic literature, especially in the field of urban and regional planning, there is no universal definition, and different types and interpretations of peri-urban areas can be found in the literature. Identifying physical limits and boundaries, as well as defining what is peri-urban and what is not, are important issues for planning these spaces at city and metropolitan levels but are not easy to solve due to their heterogeneity. Establishing land use rules for peri-urban areas is a crucial issue for maintaining and fostering primary and vital ecosystem services, especially in terms of functions provided to urban core areas. Developing a replicable method to identify and regulate peri-urban areas, exportable to other European countries, is the aim of this study. In this paper, the authors propose a method applied to the case study of Turin (Italy), based on a collaborative and place-based approach, the identification of certain peri-urbanization conditions, and the definition of rules and guidelines for peri-urban areas, in order to support decision-makers at different levels. These planning tools were adopted by the recent General Territorial Plan of the Turin Metropolitan Area (TMA). In conclusion, the authors highlighted not only the strengths and possible limitations of this method but also the role of the landscape planning approach in terms of the protection and management of peri-urban areas, considering some of the new challenges that will likely involve future peri-urban research and planning practices. Full article
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2022

Jump to: 2023

21 pages, 6118 KiB  
Article
Challenges Entailed in Applying Ecosystem Services Supply and Demand Mapping Approaches: A Practice Report
by Claudia Dworczyk and Benjamin Burkhard
Land 2023, 12(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12010052 - 24 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1916
Abstract
The Ecosystem Services (ES) concept has been acknowledged by scientists, policy-makers and practitioners to have the potential to support sustainable policy- and land-use decision-making. Therefore, a growing number of research activities are investigating the integration potential of the ES concept into real-world policy- [...] Read more.
The Ecosystem Services (ES) concept has been acknowledged by scientists, policy-makers and practitioners to have the potential to support sustainable policy- and land-use decision-making. Therefore, a growing number of research activities are investigating the integration potential of the ES concept into real-world policy- and decision-making processes. These research activities are often confronted with conceptual challenges and methodological obstacles when applying different ES mapping approaches. This study is reporting those challenges encountered during a research project in Germany. In this research project, two urban regions, Rostock and Munich, were selected as case-study areas. In both urban regions, dynamic urbanisation processes occur across the urban administrative boundaries and threaten the supply of multiple ES in the periurban landscapes. The research project invited local stakeholders from the two urban regions to workshops and online meetings to discuss ES-related topics. For those events, maps visualising the spatial patterns of multiple ES were needed for communication and awareness-raising of the ES concept. We chose commonly used and relatively easy-to-apply mapping methods such as: (1) expert-based ES matrix approach, (2) simple GIS mapping with proxy indicators and data, and (3) simple ES models such as InVEST. We encountered several challenges during the mapping processes: The expert-based matrix approach provided valuable results for ES supply, but had limitations in assessing expert estimates for ES demand. Alongside other factors, evolving barriers related to the conceptual complexity of ES demand. Data unavailability/inaccessibility resulted in difficulties mapping all selected ES with proxy indicators at the targeted regional scale. So far, only a few individual ES can be modelled with InVEST models. Despite these challenges, the resulting maps were helpful for communication with local stakeholders. The discussions with stakeholders provided valuable insights into the future needs for ES research and identified existing barriers and challenges. We want to summarise and share our experiences and provide recommendations for future research on mapping ES supply and demand in urban regions. Full article
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21 pages, 2164 KiB  
Article
Delimiting Rural Areas: Evidence from the Application of Different Methods Elaborated by Italian Scholars
by Valentina Cattivelli
Land 2022, 11(10), 1674; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11101674 - 28 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2004
Abstract
The present text illustrates the methods developed by Italian scholars to delimit rural areas in the period 2005–2020 and compares the relative territorial representations graphically and quantitatively. In that period, Italian scholars experimented with several methods to delimit territories because they are pressed [...] Read more.
The present text illustrates the methods developed by Italian scholars to delimit rural areas in the period 2005–2020 and compares the relative territorial representations graphically and quantitatively. In that period, Italian scholars experimented with several methods to delimit territories because they are pressed by the desire to find the one that best described the territories, i.e., was both locally relevant and internationally comparable. This pressure originates from the need to map intermediate territories and redesign urban–rural extremes. In addition, it depends on the need to efficiently allocate national and European funds and circumscribe the corresponding program areas. Finally, it is also strongly related to the desire to internationally compare the economic, social, and environmental performance of homogeneous and permanently delimited territories. The text describes the key features of the methods they developed, such as adopted statistical technique and the spatial unit, the processed variables, and the territorial typologies. The results reveal that municipalities and provinces are preferred as spatial units, while economic and demographic indicators are the most used and elaborated through both relatively simple and articulated statistical techniques. The resulting territorial representations show different degrees of ruralization. While some methods design a mostly weakly urban and rural Italy, others completely ignore rural territories. Where they delimit them, the percentage of the population living in each territorial typology varies a lot. No scholars have either applied the methods at an international level or replicated them in other studies. Full article
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