Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 July 2023) | Viewed by 11074

Special Issue Editors

Canada Research Chair (T2) in the Human Dimensions of Sustainability and Resilience, Department of Geography, Vancouver Island University, 900 Fifth Street, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6E9, Canada
Interests: tropical forest change; wildfire management; rural development and forest conservation; land use; forest transitions; payment for environmental services; REDD+; GIS/remote sensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Marine Research, Department of Aquatic Resources, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Turistgatan 5, SE-453 30 Lysekil, Sweden
Interests: food webs; biodiversity; population, community and ecosystem ecology; fisheries; ecosystem-based management; biocomplexity; biological oceanography; climate change; philosophy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Saint Louis University (SU), St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
Interests: wildlife ecology; wildlife conservation; conservation biology; biodiversity; zoology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land-change dynamics affect biodiversity and, in turn, human wellbeing at both societal and individual scales. Land-change dynamics are typically driven by short-term economic imperatives that rarely acknowledge their implications for biodiversity and/or human wellbeing. These implications are often somewhat removed from actual land-change dynamics or are otherwise unquantified. Human wellbeing, broadly defined, remains tenuously understood in relation to ongoing biodiversity losses driven by land change.

This Special Issue welcomes submissions that highlight the nexus of land change, biodiversity, and wellbeing with respect to its trends, compromises, and controversies. All article types are welcome, from full empirical studies to short research notes to commentaries and reviews.

Dr. Sean Sloan
Dr. Andrea Belgrano
Dr. Stephen Blake
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

16 pages, 2300 KiB  
Article
Land Use Transition and Its Driving Mechanism of “Human–Elephant” Conflicts Zone in Yunnan, China
by Yuan Wang, Zhiyu Liu, Yanfang Wen and Yahui Wang
Land 2023, 12(5), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12051104 - 22 May 2023
Viewed by 1325
Abstract
In recent years, the issue of “human–elephant” conflict in the south of the Yunnan Province, China has been escalating and poses a severe threat to the livelihoods of local residents. To address this problem, this study utilized survey data from farmers in Pu’er [...] Read more.
In recent years, the issue of “human–elephant” conflict in the south of the Yunnan Province, China has been escalating and poses a severe threat to the livelihoods of local residents. To address this problem, this study utilized survey data from farmers in Pu’er City and villages in Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province. By employing land input–output analysis and spatial analysis methods, this study aims to uncover the land use transition in the research area over the past three decades and identify the driving mechanism behind this transition. The findings of this research can provide valuable guidance for reducing regional conflicts between humans and wild animals, as well as improving the livelihoods of farmers. Research indicates that farmers in the study area have significantly transformed their land use practices. The per capita arable land area has increased, and traditional grain crops are being replaced with economically profitable crops such as rubber. Rubber is the predominant crop in the conflict-prone “human–elephant” core region, while other economic crops dominate the peripheral region. The overall land use index has risen, with a greater diversity and stability in land use structure. However, the input–output efficiency of cultivated land in the “human–elephant” core region remains low, leading to a lower comprehensive land use index than that of the peripheral region. The land use transition is influenced by several factors, including socio-economic development, changes in crop comparative benefits, and the activities of wild Asian elephants. Frequent crop destruction by elephants, which results in damage to farmers’ livelihoods, is the primary cause of land use changes in “human–elephant” conflict areas. Ultimately, this conflict stems from the competition for regional land resources between humans and elephants, as humans dominate production space while elephants dominate ecological space. Local governments should optimize the layout of regional production and ecological spaces to alleviate these conflicts while also regulating circulation markets and improving farmers’ land output levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 2534 KiB  
Article
Changes in Richness and Species Composition after Five Years of Grazing Exclusion in an Endemic Pasture of Northern Mexico
by José Ramón Arévalo, Cristina González-Montelongo, Juan A. Encina-Domínguez, Eduardo García and Miguel Mellado
Land 2022, 11(11), 1962; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11111962 - 02 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1070
Abstract
A well-managed grazing system improves the productivity and health, and it is important to promote sustainability. We analyzed the impact of grazing on the Sierra de Zapalinamé protected area in north Mexico. Our hypothesis was that grazing modifies species composition, richness, and nutrients [...] Read more.
A well-managed grazing system improves the productivity and health, and it is important to promote sustainability. We analyzed the impact of grazing on the Sierra de Zapalinamé protected area in north Mexico. Our hypothesis was that grazing modifies species composition, richness, and nutrients after grazing exclusion for five years. In this area, eight plots were excluded from grazing, and species richness, evenness, and plant functional types for five years were monitored. This monitoring was also carried out on eight control plots adjacent to the excluded plots. Soil samples were collected from each plot in the fifth year of exclusion for nutrient content analysis. Grazing discriminated plant species composition after five years between excluded and control plots, but not species richness and evenness. In addition, exclusion increased grass cover and decreased forb cover. Indicator species for excluded and control sites were identified. It was concluded that part of the pastures can be excluded from grazing as a way to analyze changes in this protected area and promote greater plant diversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2241 KiB  
Article
Ecological Well-Being Performance Evaluation of Chinese Major Node Cities along the Belt and Road
by Jing Bian, Feng Lan, Zhao Hui, Jiamin Bai and Yuanping Wang
Land 2022, 11(11), 1928; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11111928 - 29 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1381
Abstract
Under the constraints of resources and the environment, improving the urban ecological well-being performance (EWP) is a fundamental requirement and inevitable choice for urban ecological civilization construction and sustainable development. In this paper, 36 Chinese major node cities along the Belt [...] Read more.
Under the constraints of resources and the environment, improving the urban ecological well-being performance (EWP) is a fundamental requirement and inevitable choice for urban ecological civilization construction and sustainable development. In this paper, 36 Chinese major node cities along the Belt and Road were selected as the research area, and an EWP evaluation index system was constructed. The two-stage Super Network Slack-based measure (Super-NSBM) model was used to evaluate the static EWP from 2011 to 2018, and the Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index was used to evaluate the dynamic EWP. It was found that: (1) The EWP value of 36 Chinese major node cities along the Belt and Road from 2011 to 2018 did not reach effectiveness, with Sanya, Shenzhen, and Haikou being the top three performers. (2) In terms of two-stage efficiency, the ecological economic efficiency in the first stage was significantly lower than the economic well-being efficiency in the second stage, which indicated that the low ecological economic efficiency was the main reason for the low average value of the EWP. (3) From the dynamic analysis results, the Malmquist–Luenberger productivity index experienced a fluctuating upward trend, and the technical change was the main factor for the improvement in the EWP. Finally, policy recommendations were proposed based on the above findings. This study will contribute to the sustainable development of Chinese major node cities along the Belt and Road, and can provide a reference for other Belt and Road regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 13306 KiB  
Article
Functional Tradeoffs and Feature Recognition of Rural Production–Living–Ecological Spaces
by Tianyi Zhao, Yuning Cheng, Yiyang Fan and Xiangnan Fan
Land 2022, 11(7), 1103; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11071103 - 19 Jul 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
Recently, the spatial contradiction in rural construction has intensified. Production–living–ecological (PLE) spaces, as important load-bearing spatial patterns of rural revitalization, have become a research focus of territorial space planning. Because of the lack of studies on the scale and accuracy at the township [...] Read more.
Recently, the spatial contradiction in rural construction has intensified. Production–living–ecological (PLE) spaces, as important load-bearing spatial patterns of rural revitalization, have become a research focus of territorial space planning. Because of the lack of studies on the scale and accuracy at the township level in rural PLE spaces, the objective of this study is to quantify the subfunctional and functional areas of PLE spaces, weigh the relationship between PLE functions, and conduct feature identification and strategy formulation of the PLE synergistic functional areas. Combined with multitype measurement methods, the study constructed a township-level PLE space evaluation system composed of 12 subfunctional indicators. Taking Guli Street in Nanjing city as an example, Spearman correlation analysis, spatial local autocorrelation analysis, and cold/hot spot identification were used to analyze the synergies and tradeoffs between PLE functions. On this basis, the evaluation model of the PLE synergies area was constructed. The results showed that the production function showed a fragmented distribution pattern. The proportion of high-intensity living function areas was very small. The ecological function area had good patch integrity. In the PLE functions, obvious synergies exist between any two functions, and the tradeoff between the third one and any of the two functions. The seven types of PLE synergistic potential areas were dominated by the dual-function high synergistic zone (DF-H-Z). The zoning scheme and governance strategy proposed in this paper have important practical value for solving the contradiction of sustainable and coordinated development of township-scale spatial resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

12 pages, 928 KiB  
Review
Feral Animal Populations: Separating Threats from Opportunities
by Eduardo J. Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Jesús Gil-Morión and Juan J. Negro
Land 2022, 11(8), 1370; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11081370 - 22 Aug 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2887
Abstract
Feral animals are those that live in the wild but are descendants of domesticated populations. Although, in many cases, these feral populations imply a demonstrable risk to the ecosystems in which they live and may conflict with local wild species and human activities, [...] Read more.
Feral animals are those that live in the wild but are descendants of domesticated populations. Although, in many cases, these feral populations imply a demonstrable risk to the ecosystems in which they live and may conflict with local wild species and human activities, there are feral populations that are considered worth preserving and, in some cases, they already enjoy protection by interest groups and even public authorities. In this review, we aim to identify valuable populations using three criteria: (a) Genetic conservation value (for instance, if the wild ancestor is extinct), (b) the niche occupancy criterion and, finally, (c) a cultural criterion. We propose a detailed analysis of feral populations under scrutiny, supporting control measures when necessary, but also allowing for international protection at the same level as wild animals for feral taxa of special concern. Feral taxa, which are already in the focus of conservation efforts, and should be awarded extended recognition and protection, mainly include ancient lineages with relevant genetic or cultural importance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

15 pages, 979 KiB  
Perspective
The Social License to Restore—Perspectives on Community Involvement in Indonesian Peatland Restoration
by Benjamin John Wiesner and Paul Dargusch
Land 2022, 11(7), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11071038 - 08 Jul 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1754
Abstract
The tropical peatlands of Indonesia are widely recognized as a globally significant carbon stock and an important provider of crucial ecosystem services. However, in recent years they have been increasingly degraded. The Indonesian government has attempted to involve communities in peatland restoration efforts. [...] Read more.
The tropical peatlands of Indonesia are widely recognized as a globally significant carbon stock and an important provider of crucial ecosystem services. However, in recent years they have been increasingly degraded. The Indonesian government has attempted to involve communities in peatland restoration efforts. These attempts were made in recognition of (1) the important role livelihood activities play in land degradation processes and (2) the ‘gatekeeping’ and stewardship role local communities play in ensuring the durability and longer-term effectiveness of restoration activities. Engaging communities has proven challenging for many reasons, but particularly because of the historical distrust local communities have towards land management interventions. In this article, we borrow the concept of a social license to operate (SLO) from the business management literature to understand why and how community involvement impacts peatland restoration in Indonesia. We introduce the concept and conceptual models of a social license to restore (SLR). As a result of engaging with our perspective, readers will be able to identify how issues of government distrust, low levels of community participation, and poverty—and the counterfactual—may impact the longer-term success of restoration initiatives and how a social license to restore may expedite progress in restoration. Secondly, discussing and linking the multi-faceted issues of peatland restoration will highlight its relevance within the land, biodiversity and human well-being nexus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers for Land, Biodiversity, and Human Wellbeing Section)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop