Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Systems and Global Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 January 2024) | Viewed by 3938

Special Issue Editors

School of Public Affairs, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044, China
Interests: multifunctional land use; land use transition; farmland transfer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Public Affairs, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: land use conflicts/trade-offs; rural land reform; agrarian change in China
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Yanfeng Jiang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Policy and Management, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004, China
Interests: urban-rural planning; land consolidation; multifunctional land use; land use management
Dr. Chao Liu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Public Administration, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079, China
Interests: land resource evaluation; ecosystem services; territorial spatial governance; urban-rural integrated development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Land system dynamics, within the intricate framework of terrains and territorial boundaries, present a captivating challenge for understanding the complexities of sustainable development. China's distinctive landscape and socio-economic context offer a unique lens through which to decipher the multifaceted interactions and interdependencies within land systems. This Special Issue aims to unravel the enigma of land-system dynamics in China, exploring the intricate web of complexities and resilience that shape its territorial landscape.

Objective:

This Special Issue aims to comprehensively unravel the intricacies engrained within China's land system dynamics, tailor-made to address its unique context and formidable challenges. By adopting an integrated approach, it endeavors to shed light on the intricate interplay between governance mechanisms, socio-economic dimensions, and ecological resilience, shaping the stability and sustainability of land systems in China. In pursuit of this objective, this endeavor strives to enhance our comprehension of territorial dynamics within the framework of intricate land systems.

Topics of Interest:

We invite contributions that delve into, but are not limited to, the following thematic areas:

  1. Complex adaptive governance systems: Exploring interactions between institutions, policies, and land use dynamics in China's land systems;
  2. Interdisciplinary territorial analysis: Utilizing advanced modeling and spatial techniques to understand the intricate interplay of natural processes, human activities, and territorial dynamics;
  3. Socio-economic influences on land use governance: Investigating factors shaping decision-making processes in China's land system dynamics, including socio-cultural, economic, and demographic aspects;
  4. Enhancing resilience in land systems: Exploring adaptive strategies for achieving long-term sustainability, ecological integrity, and socio-economic stability in China's land systems;
  5. Managing trade-offs and synergies in land system governance: Understanding conflicts, synergies, and trade-offs between land use objectives like food security, ecosystem services, and urbanization in China's context;
  6. Lessons from China's land system dynamics: Drawing insights from past and ongoing experiences to guide future policy formulation and management strategies.

Dr. Li Ma
Dr. Yingnan Zhang
Dr. Yanfeng Jiang
Dr. Chao Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land systems
  • theories of land system change
  • land degradation
  • human-environment systems
  • man–land relations
  • land use/land cover change
  • land use transition
  • urban land management
  • rural land use
  • sustainable land use
  • urban sprawl and regeneration
  • urban–rural migration and housing affairs

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 5524 KiB  
Article
Dynamical Identification of Urban-Rural Gradient and Ecosystem Service Response: A Case Study of Jinghong City, China
Land 2024, 13(3), 306; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030306 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 199
Abstract
Understanding ecosystem service characteristics along urban-rural gradients is vital for enhancing the well-being of urban and rural residents. Despite this importance, prior research has neglected the dynamic evolution of urban-rural gradients during urbanization. This study investigates the spatiotemporal variations of four ecosystem services—habitat [...] Read more.
Understanding ecosystem service characteristics along urban-rural gradients is vital for enhancing the well-being of urban and rural residents. Despite this importance, prior research has neglected the dynamic evolution of urban-rural gradients during urbanization. This study investigates the spatiotemporal variations of four ecosystem services—habitat quality, carbon sequestration, water yield, and soil retention—along the urban-rural gradient in Jinghong City, China. We propose a method for identifying the gradient using the inverse S function of urban land density distribution and concentric analysis. From 2000 to 2020, ecosystem service supply capacity in Jinghong City continuously declined, indicating degradation over the two decades. The urban-rural gradient zone is classified as core area, inner urban area, suburban area, and urban periphery, each experiencing outward expansion, reflecting significant urbanization. Changes in ecosystem services along the gradient revealed consistently high losses in habitat quality, carbon sequestration, and overall services in the inner urban area, while water yield and soil retention suffered the greatest losses in the urban periphery. As urbanization expanded outward, the loss of these services shifted from the inner urban area to the suburban and urban periphery. These results support decision-making in urban planning and sustainable development for urban-rural regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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20 pages, 17940 KiB  
Article
Ecosystem Service Value Assessment of the Yellow River Delta Based on Satellite Remote Sensing Data
Land 2024, 13(3), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030276 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 312
Abstract
The Yellow River Delta (YRD) stands as a globally significant wetland, playing a pivotal role in sustaining regional ecosystem stability and offering crucial ecosystem services to humanity. However, anthropogenic activities, particularly resource development, unavoidably disrupt the ecosystem, leading to the degradation of these [...] Read more.
The Yellow River Delta (YRD) stands as a globally significant wetland, playing a pivotal role in sustaining regional ecosystem stability and offering crucial ecosystem services to humanity. However, anthropogenic activities, particularly resource development, unavoidably disrupt the ecosystem, leading to the degradation of these vital services. Utilizing satellite remote sensing data, the InVEST model, and energy analysis, this study introduces the concept of ‘emergy’ as an ‘intermediate variable’ to investigate the spatiotemporal changes in the ecosystem service value of the YRD. Five distinct types of ecosystem services are selected for quantitative assessment and analysis of the YRD’s spatiotemporal evolution from 1990 to 2020. Results indicate a 63.7% decline in the total value of ecosystem services from 1990 to 2010, followed by a 16.5% increase from 2010 to 2020. The study also unveils spatial shifts in high- and low-value areas of ecosystem services and attributes these changes to rapid urbanization and alterations in land use and cover. The assessment of ecosystem service values concretizes the intangible ecosystem service functions of natural resources. This lays the foundation for establishing a mechanism that combines positive incentives and reverse pressure to achieve the economic valuation of ecosystem service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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22 pages, 12036 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Land Cover Change in the Yellow River Basin over the Past Millennium
Land 2024, 13(2), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13020260 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 386
Abstract
Investigating the ecological and environmental impacts stemming from historical land use and land cover change (LUCC) holds paramount importance in systematically comprehending the fundamental human-land relationship, a pivotal focus within geographical research. The Yellow River Basin (YRB), often referred to as the cradle [...] Read more.
Investigating the ecological and environmental impacts stemming from historical land use and land cover change (LUCC) holds paramount importance in systematically comprehending the fundamental human-land relationship, a pivotal focus within geographical research. The Yellow River Basin (YRB), often referred to as the cradle of Chinese civilization, ranks as the fifth-largest river basin globally. Early inhabitants made significant alterations to the landscape, resulting in substantial damage to natural vegetation, giving rise to prominent regional ecological challenges. By now, the examination of historical LUCC in the YRB over the past millennium remains in the qualitative research stage, primarily due to the limited availability of high-confidence gridded historical LUCC data. This study aims to advance the current historical LUCC research in the YRB from primarily qualitative analysis to an exploration incorporating timing, positioning, and quantification. Based on reconstructed historical cropland, forest, and grassland grid data of 10 km × 10 km from 1000 AD to 2000 AD, the degree of cropland development and the depletion of forests and grasslands were calculated, respectively. Then, the kernel density method was employed for spatiotemporal analysis and interpretation of dynamic changes in land cover. Subsequently, a cartographic visualization depicting the migration trajectories of the land cover gravity centers was generated, allowing for an assessment of the distance and direction of the centroids’ movement of cropland, forest, and grassland. The results indicate that the cropland coverage in the YRB escalated from the initial 11.65% to 29.97%, while the forest and grassland coverage dropped from 63.36% to 44.49%. The distribution of cultivated land continually expanded outward from the southeast of the Loess Plateau and the southwest of the North China Plain. All three types of land cover experienced a westward shift in their gravity centers between 1000 and 2000 AD. Besides the population growth and technological advancements, the regime shifts induced by wars, along with land use policies in distinct periods, always served as the predominant factors influencing the conversion between different land covers. This research will present a paradigmatic regional case study contributing to the investigation of historical changes in land use and land cover. Additionally, it will offer historical perspectives beneficial for the advancement of China’s objectives in “Ecological Conservation and High-Quality Development of the Yellow River Basin”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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22 pages, 14024 KiB  
Article
Urban Land Carbon Emission and Carbon Emission Intensity Prediction Based on Patch-Generating Land Use Simulation Model and Grid with Multiple Scenarios in Tianjin
Land 2023, 12(12), 2160; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12122160 - 13 Dec 2023
Viewed by 817
Abstract
With regard to the aims of achieving the “Dual Carbon” goal and addressing the significant greenhouse gas emissions caused by urban expansion, there has been a growing emphasis on spatial research and the prediction of urban carbon emissions. This article examines land use [...] Read more.
With regard to the aims of achieving the “Dual Carbon” goal and addressing the significant greenhouse gas emissions caused by urban expansion, there has been a growing emphasis on spatial research and the prediction of urban carbon emissions. This article examines land use data from 2000 to 2020 and combines Grid and the PLUS model to predict carbon emissions in 2030 through a multi-scenario simulation. The research findings indicate the following: (1) Between 2000 and 2020, construction land increased by 95.83%, with carbon emissions also increasing. (2) By 2030, for the NDS (natural development scenario), carbon emissions are expected to peak at 6012.87 × 104 t. Regarding the ratio obtained through the EDS (economic development scenario), construction land is projected to grow to 3990.72 km2, with expected emissions of 6863.29 × 104 t. For the LCS (low-carbon scenario), the “carbon peak” is expected to be reached before 2030. (3) The intensity of carbon emissions decreases as the city size increases. (4) The shift of the center of carbon emission intensity and the center of construction land all indicate movement towards the southeast. Studying the trends of regional land use change and the patterns of land use carbon emissions is beneficial for optimizing the land use structure, thereby enabling us to achieve low-carbon emission reductions and sustainable urban development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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16 pages, 13551 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Patterning and Matching of Ecosystem Services’ Supply and Demand in Changchun, China
Land 2023, 12(12), 2101; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12122101 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 629
Abstract
The process of urbanization has deepened the contradiction between ecosystem services’ supply and demand, resulting in a significant risk to ecological security. Thus, it is imperative to conduct an analysis of the correlation between ecosystem services’ supply and demand to achieve sustainable urban [...] Read more.
The process of urbanization has deepened the contradiction between ecosystem services’ supply and demand, resulting in a significant risk to ecological security. Thus, it is imperative to conduct an analysis of the correlation between ecosystem services’ supply and demand to achieve sustainable urban growth. This study evaluated the supply, demand, coordination index, and matching types of ecosystem services’ supply and demand in 2000, 2010, and 2020 based on multisource data in Changchun City. The results showed that ecosystem services’ supply decreased overall, while their demand continued to increase from 2000 to 2020, together with their spatial heterogeneity. The regions characterized by a low supply of and high demand for ecosystem services mostly encompassed central urban regions that have undergone a substantial level of socioeconomic advancement. Conversely, the regions characterized by a high supply and low demand were primarily hilly regions with a sparse population that were situated at higher altitudes. There has been slight incoordination between ecosystem services’ supply and demand in Changchun. In the future, it is imperative for sustainable urban development strategies to protect cultivated and ecological lands, extensively enhance the benefits of the lands, and facilitate the coordinated development of cities, agriculture, and ecology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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18 pages, 1385 KiB  
Article
Why Have China’s Poverty Eradication Policy Resulted in the Decline of Arable Land in Poverty-Stricken Areas?
Land 2023, 12(10), 1856; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12101856 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 781
Abstract
Arable land resources are the basic livelihood security for people in poverty-stricken areas, and poor people are prone to uncontrolled expansion of arable land and exogenous ecological damage to secure their livelihoods. To avoid this vicious cycle, China’s poverty eradication policy requires greater [...] Read more.
Arable land resources are the basic livelihood security for people in poverty-stricken areas, and poor people are prone to uncontrolled expansion of arable land and exogenous ecological damage to secure their livelihoods. To avoid this vicious cycle, China’s poverty eradication policy requires greater management and restoration of arable land in poverty-stricken areas, but it is unknown what impacts it may bring. Therefore, this study examines the impact of policy implementation on arable land by the Difference-in-Differences (DID) model and uses the mediating and moderating models to test the policy’s mechanism on arable land. The results reveal that the policy significantly reduces the arable land, and the results remain robust, controlling for potential endogeneity variables and robustness tests. What’s more, the results of the mediating and moderating effect models indicate that the reduction of arable land is mainly due to the increase of unit yield, guiding the local people to abandon degraded land and to carry out ecological restoration, thus reducing the arable land area and achieving sustainable development. Finally, recommendations are proposed from the perspective of human-land coordination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deciphering Land-System Dynamics in China)
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