Urban Planning and Housing Market II

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Contexts and Urban-Rural Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 September 2024 | Viewed by 2960

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Socio-Economic Geography, Institute of Spatial Management and Geography, Faculty of Geoengineering, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Prawocheńskiego 15, 10-724 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: decision-making process; perception of space; urban development; suburbanization; spatial analyses; real estate market
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Spatial Analysis and Real Estate Market, Institute of Spatial Management and Geography, Faculty of Geoengineering, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Prawocheńskiego 15, 10-724 Olsztyn, Poland
Interests: real estate market; urban development; spatial modeling; geostatistics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The interactions between urban planning and the housing market play a key role in the context of progressing urbanization, urban population growth and the rising demand for housing. The rational distribution of housing resources in cities (and functional urban areas) is one of the key priorities of urban planning. The relevant measures should be consistent with the principles of sustainable development, and the rational management of space and social justice. The existing problems and social needs should be identified and resolved in order to improve the quality of life.

The identification and evaluation of the processes in the housing market in the economic, social, and spatial dimensions are key elements of urban planning. The development of geographic information systems as well as quantitative and qualitative analytical methods promotes a new approach to evaluations of urban space, where housing resources that meet fundamental human needs play a special role.

This Special Issue will focus on the extent to which urban planning and management systems address complex and dynamic trends in the housing market. How can urban planning effectively cater to housing needs? Can urban planning improve housing affordability and housing supply? What remedial measures can be implemented to prevent spatial, social, and economic segregation in cities? How and where should new housing estates be planned? Can urban densification be reconciled with a high quality of life?

Prof. Dr. Agnieszka Szczepańska
Dr. Radosław Cellmer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • urban planning
  • spatial planning
  • housing market
  • housing needs
  • housing demand and supply
  • real-estate value
  • spatial analysis

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 2525 KiB  
Article
Spatial Disparity and Residential Assessment of Housing Cost-Burdened Renters
by Hyunjeong Lee
Land 2024, 13(3), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030394 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 750
Abstract
With the expanding rental sector and rising housing expenses, this research aims to compare the socio-demographic, economic, and housing statuses of renters burdened by housing costs in four regions, and also to explore predictors affecting their residential assessment. Using data from the 2020 [...] Read more.
With the expanding rental sector and rising housing expenses, this research aims to compare the socio-demographic, economic, and housing statuses of renters burdened by housing costs in four regions, and also to explore predictors affecting their residential assessment. Using data from the 2020 Korean Housing Survey, this cross-sectional study identified 245 cost-burdened households whose housing expenses accounted for more than 25% of their total gross income and living expenses. The results revealed that the majority of renters were single-person households residing in single-room occupancy units of multifamily housing, primarily comprising unemployed older adults aged 50 and over. While earning less than half of the minimum wage, the renters’ living expenses fell well below the minimum cost of living, and more than 40% of the expenditure was spent on housing costs, resulting in cost-overburdened households. With the correlation between income, deposit, and rent, the burden of housing costs and the quality of the residential environment varied among regions. Indeed, the residential assessment of the renters was significantly influenced by urban amenities, and both income deficits and excessive housing cost burdens required inclusive and prompt housing interventions including housing assistance, provision of affordable public housing, income transfer, and transitions from renting to Chonsei arrangements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Planning and Housing Market II)
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13 pages, 242 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Housing Rental Market Development on Household Consumption and Its Mechanism: Evidence from 69 Large- and Medium-Sized Cities in China
by Kong Yu and Sun Guo
Land 2023, 12(7), 1421; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071421 - 15 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1410
Abstract
In recent years, to address the sluggish domestic demand caused by the epidemic, consumption has declined. The General Office of the State Council has introduced a series of policy measures around the improvement and development of the housing rental market. The paper empirically [...] Read more.
In recent years, to address the sluggish domestic demand caused by the epidemic, consumption has declined. The General Office of the State Council has introduced a series of policy measures around the improvement and development of the housing rental market. The paper empirically investigates the influence mechanism of the development of the housing rental market on residents’ consumption using relevant data from the 2010–2019 City Statistical Yearbook and the Xi Tai database. It is found that the increase in the scale of housing rentals significantly raises the level of residents’ consumption. Specifically, the increase in the scale of housing rentals can increase government expenditure, firm up residents’ consumption confidence, and thus raise residents’ consumption level; urban labor inflow plays a negative moderating role in the development of the housing rental market to promote residents’ consumption level. The heterogeneity study shows that the improvement and development of the housing rental market in the eastern coastal region has a more significant role in promoting residents’ consumption level, while it is not significant for residents’ consumption level in the central and western regions. The study suggests that to release the vitality of residents’ consumption, government spending should be increased, the impact of inflowing labor on the labor market should be reduced, and the development of the housing rental market should be improved and nurtured. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Planning and Housing Market II)
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