Selected Papers from the 2022 Annual Conference on Development Geography

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Land Systems and Global Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 April 2024 | Viewed by 10282

Special Issue Editors

School of Information Engineering, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: GIScience; LULC and climate; geographic knowledge graph; geographic simulation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China
Interests: ecosystem services; water management; land-use change; agriculture management; climate change
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Land Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: land use and management; resources policy and management
School of Public Administration and Policy, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872, China
Interests: big data for spatial governance; GIScience; spatial analysis and modeling; machine learning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will comprise selected papers from the 2022 Annual Conference on Development Geography. The event will be held during 18–20 November 2022 at China University of Geosciences in Beijing.

The theme of the 2022 Annual Conference on Development Geography is development geography and sustainable land systems. This conference will discuss issues related to sustainable land systems, agricultural land use, climate change, food security, spatial planning, and big data technology; it will analyze land management policies and their economic effects, condense and optimize innovation-driven development policies, and help to provide regulatory policies and scientific paths for the implementation of regional sustainable development strategy and the promotion of the construction of "Beautiful China".

The topics that this annual conference intends to discuss include but are not limited to:

  • Land system governance and sustainable management;
  • Big data and land degradation neutrality control;
  • Land competition and optimal utilization of territorial space;
  • Agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sink;
  • Simulation and prediction of coupled climate-land-water-food system;
  • Rehabilitation of ecosystems of mountains, rivers, forests, fields, lakes, grass, and sand;
  • Food security and protection and utilization of black land;
  • Ecological product value accounting and realization path;
  • Sustainable management optimization of strategic mineral resources industry chain;
  • Big data and evaluation of resource and environmental carrying capacity;
  • Geological heritage and geological culture.

Accepted papers will be published in open access format in Land and collected together in the Special Issue website. 

The Special Issue will be open to submissions by authors who did not present at the conference. We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Chunxiao Zhang
Dr. Zhihui Li
Dr. Yuping Bai
Dr. Le Yu
Dr. Minrui Zheng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sustainable land systems
  • development geography
  • land use
  • climate change
  • food security

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 4008 KiB  
Article
Study on the Trade-Offs of Land Functions in the Central Plain of China for Sustainable Development
Land 2023, 12(12), 2125; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12122125 - 30 Nov 2023
Viewed by 680
Abstract
Properly managing the relationship between food security, ecological protection, and urbanization, and coordinating the trade-offs among these three factors for land demand are extremely important for environmental management and sustainable development. In this study, we attempt to analyze the state of land use [...] Read more.
Properly managing the relationship between food security, ecological protection, and urbanization, and coordinating the trade-offs among these three factors for land demand are extremely important for environmental management and sustainable development. In this study, we attempt to analyze the state of land use trade-offs from a dynamic perspective in terms of both potential and efficiency. We have innovatively proposed a new land use trade-off analysis framework integrating the Estimation System for Land Productivity (ESLP) model, machine learning algorithms, ecosystem service value assessment, and spatial analysis method. By applying the framework, the potential and efficiency of the three land use functions of urban development, ecological protection, and agricultural production on the Huang-Huai-Hai (HHH) Plain were comprehensively estimated, and the trade-off relationship between the three land use functions was identified. The results showed a prominent conflict between urban development and agricultural production (around 8%) on the HHH Plain, especially in the Beijing–Tianjin–Hebei urban agglomeration and the southern Jiangsu urban agglomeration. In the mountainous areas, such as northern Hebei and central Shandong, there was an obvious trade-off between ecological land and agriculture land. Most cities had a trade-off between ecological land and urban land (approximately 6% of the study area), but it was relatively more relaxed in comparison. Finally, we found that on the HHH Plain, where land resources are fiercely competitive, spatial planning and land resource control depend not only on the suitability or potential of the land unit, but also on whether the efficiency of land use has reached an appropriate range. The smart way to use land resources is to scientifically trade-off different land use functions and improve the efficiency of land use to achieve maximum benefit. Full article
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23 pages, 5788 KiB  
Article
Spatial–Temporal Evolution and Driving Factors of the Low–Carbon Transition of Farmland Use in Coastal Areas of Guangdong Province
Land 2023, 12(5), 1007; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12051007 - 04 May 2023
Viewed by 1000
Abstract
The low–carbon transition of farmland use (LCTFU) is an effective measure to coordinate the development of farmland and the environment to meet China’s “dual carbon” and green agricultural transformation goals. We studied the spatial–temporal evolution of the LCTFU and further explored the driving [...] Read more.
The low–carbon transition of farmland use (LCTFU) is an effective measure to coordinate the development of farmland and the environment to meet China’s “dual carbon” and green agricultural transformation goals. We studied the spatial–temporal evolution of the LCTFU and further explored the driving factors of the LCTFU by applying a geographically weighted regression model (GWR) to the coastal cities of Guangdong Province from 2000 to 2020. The results show that (1) temporally, the comprehensive, spatial, functional, and mode transitions of farmland use in coastal areas of Guangdong Province generally declined. The LCTFU level in most counties was low, and the difference in the LCTFU level among counties was narrowing. (2) Spatially, the LCTFU generally followed a high–to–low spatial distribution pattern, with high LCTFU values in the east and west and low values in the center. (3) The hotspots of the comprehensive, spatial, functional, and mode transitions were mainly concentrated in the eastern part of the study area, while the cold spots were in the central region, which is generally consistent with the spatial distribution of high– and low–value areas of the LCTFU. (4) The spatial migration path of the LCTFU migrated from northeast to southwest, with the main body of the standard deviation ellipse in the middle of the study area, displaying a C–shaped spatial pattern with weak expansion. (5) Economic, social, and environmental factors jointly contributed to the spatial–temporal evolution of the LCTFU, with social factors being the strongest driver. Full article
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13 pages, 3839 KiB  
Article
Synergies and Trade-Offs among Different Ecosystem Services through the Analyses of Spatio-Temporal Changes in Beijing, China
Land 2023, 12(5), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12051000 - 03 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1326
Abstract
Increasing global urbanization has not only resulted in economic development but it has also caused a number of ecological issues, such as haze, global warming, and storm surges, which can end up hindering the development of human society in the long term. One [...] Read more.
Increasing global urbanization has not only resulted in economic development but it has also caused a number of ecological issues, such as haze, global warming, and storm surges, which can end up hindering the development of human society in the long term. One method of maintaining the long-term growth of human ecosystems is by considering ecosystem services (ES) when making decisions over land use. This study provides information to aid with decision making in the maintenance of Beijing’s ES provision in the long term. Firstly, three key ES, namely, carbon storage (CS), habitat quality (HQ), and water yield (WY), were evaluated by the InVEST model. Then, the spatial patterns of synergies and trade-offs among three ES at the city and grid scales were explored through the correlation coefficients analysis and geographically weighted regression (GWR). Finally, the strength of trade-offs among ES was calculated based on root mean squared error (RMSE), and the potential ecological risk areas are recognized. We discovered that (1) the total carbon storage decreases from 3.74 million tons in 2000 to 3.66 million tons in 2020, and HQ has the same trend, with its average value decreasing from 0.72 to 0.67; in contrast, water yield is more stable, increasing slightly from 8.22 × 1010 m3 in 2000 to 8.23 × 1010 m3 in 2020. (2) The synergies and trade-offs of ES are spatially heterogeneous. Among them, the correlation coefficients at the city-level indicated synergistic relationships among the three ES, but CS-WY and WY-HQ always have trade-off relationships at the grid level, where 37.88% of WY-HQ and 14.59% of CS-WY were trade-offs in 2020. (3) At the urban-rural interface, the trade-offs among ES are stronger than those in other regions. In rural-urban areas, the RMSE in CS-HQ, CS-WY and WY-HQ always had high values (>0.5), accounting for 16.72%, 9.33%, and 26.94% of the entire area, respectively; these areas are identified as potential ecological risk areas, which will be the focus area for future ES regulation. These findings provide opportunities for clear trade-offs among ES and promote positive synergies. In addition, land-use management may use the results to guide ecosystem service use, identify critical areas, and ensure regional sustainability in urban development. Full article
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24 pages, 4916 KiB  
Article
Diagnosis of Key Ecological Restoration Areas in Territorial Space under the Guidance of Resilience: A Case Study of the Chengdu–Chongqing Region
Land 2023, 12(5), 973; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12050973 - 27 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1258
Abstract
Territorial space ecological restoration is a significant way to map the development of “ecological priority, green, and low-carbon” and realize the goal of reducing carbon emissions. Based on the evaluation of the degree of urban ecological resilience restriction, this study aimed to diagnose [...] Read more.
Territorial space ecological restoration is a significant way to map the development of “ecological priority, green, and low-carbon” and realize the goal of reducing carbon emissions. Based on the evaluation of the degree of urban ecological resilience restriction, this study aimed to diagnose the key areas of surface–line–point ecological restoration under the guidance of the resilience target by constructing a patch–corridor–matrix ecological network; then, the corresponding repair strategy was proposed. The results showed that (1) there was an obvious core–periphery structure in the resilience restriction intensity of the Chengdu–Chongqing region, showing a gradual decreasing trend from Chengdu and Chongqing to the surrounding cities; (2) the regional ecological network, including 17 ecological source patches and 33 potential ecological corridors, was identified; and (3) the diagnosed key areas of ecological restoration were composed of surface–line–point multiscale spatial morphology, including 7793.81 km2 of key areas of ecological source restoration, 380.39 km of key areas of ecological corridor restoration, and 29 key areas of ecological pinch point restoration. The construction of ecological restoration strategies with carbon neutralization as the core idea at different scales was realized. The research can provide a reference for scientifically identifying key areas of ecological restoration in territorial space, coordinating and planning major projects of ecological restoration, and optimizing the allocation of natural resources. Full article
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20 pages, 2432 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Spatial Agricultural Land Use Transition in Thiès Region, Senegal, and Its Potential Driving Factors
Land 2023, 12(4), 779; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12040779 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1389
Abstract
The agricultural land use transition (ALUT) assessment can be a prominent tool for comprehensively implementing suitable agricultural land use and agricultural development in Senegal. Based on remote sensing and survey data, this investigation aimed to simultaneously assess the geographical dispersion of ALUT and [...] Read more.
The agricultural land use transition (ALUT) assessment can be a prominent tool for comprehensively implementing suitable agricultural land use and agricultural development in Senegal. Based on remote sensing and survey data, this investigation aimed to simultaneously assess the geographical dispersion of ALUT and its probable mechanisms and determine the agricultural land functions in the Thiès region. Through ArcGIS and ENVI software, the remote sensing data of 2000, 2010, and 2020, the transfer matrix method and a spatial index calculation were used to characterize the ALUT. Then, the mixed linear regression model was constructed to determine the relationship between ALUT and its potential driving factors. The main results show that ALUT was about −588.66 km2. Regarding spatial distribution, a positive net ALUT was experienced in the north-west department of Tivaouane; conversely, a negative transition was noted in the southern Mbour department. The agricultural land per capita (0.37 ha/per) and the per capita agricultural income (USD $167.18) were unsatisfactory, and only 59.49% of the respondents frequently used fertilizers for production. The linear regression model showed that rainfall variability, research and development, soil salinization, and land tenure were significant at 1% (p < 0.01) with agricultural land change, living security, and ecological functions. Parallelly, transportation facilities (p < 0.01) and agricultural investment (p < 0.01) were also significant with agricultural land morphology change, while population growth (p < 0.1) was only correlated with agricultural land morphology change. These factors reflect the farmer’s income and often induce land abandonment and degradation of agricultural land. Consequentially, the ALUT in the Thiès region revealed several insights, such as the need to strengthen land use reforms and research and development. Therefore, agricultural land use is impacted by many fields that require an inter-discipline research method for practical and balanced use. Such endeavors could start with reconciling agricultural development and land conservation. Full article
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15 pages, 1353 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Agricultural Labor Migration on the Urban–Rural Dual Economic Structure: The Case of Liaoning Province, China
Land 2023, 12(3), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12030622 - 06 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
Based on the practical requirements of China’s urban–rural integrated development, it is of great theoretical and practical significance to analyze the impact of agricultural labor migration on the urban–rural dual economic structure. This paper empirically examined the impact of agricultural labor migration on [...] Read more.
Based on the practical requirements of China’s urban–rural integrated development, it is of great theoretical and practical significance to analyze the impact of agricultural labor migration on the urban–rural dual economic structure. This paper empirically examined the impact of agricultural labor migration on the urban–rural dual economic structure by using the spatial Durbin model and the geographically and temporally weighted regression model on the basis of the panel data of 14 regions in Liaoning Province from 2005 to 2020. The results show that agricultural labor migration has an obvious optimization effect and spatial spillover effect on the urban–rural dual economic structure; in terms of space, agricultural labor migration has a stronger impact on the central and western regions and a weaker impact on the southeastern regions; in terms of time, agricultural labor migration can stably promote the integration of urban and rural economies before the second Lewis turning point. Therefore, this paper provides references with regard to increasing investment in rural education and training; improving the structure of government spending; and protecting the rights and interests of rural migrants. Full article
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13 pages, 1318 KiB  
Article
Urban Green Innovation Efficiency in China: Spatiotemporal Evolution and Influencing Factors
Land 2023, 12(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12010075 - 26 Dec 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1467
Abstract
Investigating urban green innovation efficiency (UGIE) is imperative because it is correlated with the development of an ecological civilization and an innovative country. Spatiotemporal evolution and influencing factors of UGIE are two important scientific problems that are worth exploring. This study presents an [...] Read more.
Investigating urban green innovation efficiency (UGIE) is imperative because it is correlated with the development of an ecological civilization and an innovative country. Spatiotemporal evolution and influencing factors of UGIE are two important scientific problems that are worth exploring. This study presents an indicator system for UGIE that includes input, expected output, and unexpected output, and employs a super-efficiency slacks-based measure (super-SBM) to calculate UGIE in 284 cities at or above the prefecture level in China from 2005 to 2020. Then, we adopted spatial auto-correlation to identify its spatial differences among these cities and Geodetector to evaluate its influencing factors. The results are as follows: (1) The overall UGIE tended to rise, except in northeastern China, megacities, and super large-sized cities. (2) The UGIE of Chinese cities exhibited remarkable spatial differences and auto-correlation, and the “low-low” type enjoyed the most local spatial auto-correlations. (3) Sociocultural factors represented by the number of collections in public libraries became the most important factors affecting the UGIE in China. Full article
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