Resilient Communities and Sustainable Development in Deltas

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Contexts and Urban-Rural Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1752

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany
Interests: sustainable urban and regional planning and development; resilient communities; flood risk management; regional governance
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Guest Editor
College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092, China
Interests: urban and regional development; sustainability; smart cities and regions

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Guest Editor
School of Architecture and Design, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China
Interests: landscape planning and development; sustainability; urban and rural planning

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Technische Universität Dresden, 01062 Dresden, Germany
Interests: resilience; sustainable urban and regional planning and development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Delta regions play a decisive role in global demographic and socio-economic development. A large part of the world population lives in these areas, and they are both nodes of international transport corridors and major global economic powerhouses; as such, they are highly dynamic areas in social and economic terms. At the same time, delta regions are fertile, and they provide unique natural environmental conditions, which need to be protected and taken special care of.

However, delta regions and their specific features are under extreme stress and exposed to very high risks due to climate change and other global environmental and developmental challenges. They are focal areas of climate change with increased risks of natural hazards and increasing challenges (e.g., due to sea-level rise, flooding and drought), and they are areas where sustainable development is especially at stake and sustainability transformations play a special role in order to balance social, economic and environmental requirements.

These facts show that the management of land use in delta regions is not at all easy. Evidence-based decision-making requires inter- and transdisciplinary research, up-to-date information, well-justified forecasting, and case-specific decision-support tools. The highly conflicting interests and demands on land use in such areas require appropriate and well-functioning mechanisms of cooperation and multi-level governance as well as sound and effective urban and regional planning, including nature protection and urban design. Moreover, public participation is crucial to enhance risk awareness among the population, and to foster community engagement in processes of sustainability transformation.

In this context, this Special Issue looks into the actual state of delta regions worldwide. We aim to discuss future challenges and to provide good practice examples of how to enhance resilience and guarantee more sustainable development. More explicitly, in this Special Issue, we want to discuss the following questions: (1) How can communities in delta regions become more resilient? (2) How can this contribute to make delta regions more sustainable?

Papers may address topics including but not limited to:

  • Identifying and monitoring vulnerability and risk factors in delta regions;
  • Developing science-based forecasting models and scenarios as well as their usefulness for and actual use in decision-making in delta regions;
  • Analyzing the role of information technology, virtual reality and artificial intelligence in identifying and coping with vulnerability and risk factors in delta regions;
  • Developing resilience-oriented urban and regional planning and development strategies in delta regions, including urban design;
  • Fostering the protection of Nature and the environment, and developing effective environmental and landscape planning mechanisms;
  • Establishing appropriate cooperation mechanisms and (multi-level) governance models in delta regions;
  • Analyzing the role of public awareness and participation in developing resilient communities and enhancing sustainable development in delta regions;
  • Analyzing the role of resilience-oriented urban and regional development strategies in sustainable development and sustainability transformation in delta regions.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Müller
Prof. Dr. Zhiqiang Wu
Dr. Jiang Chang
Dr. Paulina Schiappacasse
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vulnerabilities and risk analysis IT, virtual reality, artificial intelligence
  • forecasts, scenarios and decision-support tools
  • environmental planning and landscape planning
  • urban and regional planning and development, urban design
  • cooperation and governance
  • public awareness and participation
  • community engagement

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 8213 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Dynamics and Influencing Factors of Vegetation Net Primary Productivity in the Yangtze River Delta Region, China
by Tinghui Wang, Mengfan Gao, Qi Fu and Jinhua Chen
Land 2024, 13(4), 440; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13040440 - 30 Mar 2024
Viewed by 566
Abstract
Vegetation Net Primary Productivity (NPP) plays a crucial role in terrestrial carbon sinks and the global carbon cycle. Investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics and influencing factors in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region can furnish a solid scientific foundation for green, low-carbon, and sustainable [...] Read more.
Vegetation Net Primary Productivity (NPP) plays a crucial role in terrestrial carbon sinks and the global carbon cycle. Investigating the spatiotemporal dynamics and influencing factors in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region can furnish a solid scientific foundation for green, low-carbon, and sustainable development in China, as well as a reference for other rapidly urbanizing regions. This study focuses on the YRD region as an illustration and utilizes the Carnegie–Ames–Stanford Approach (CASA model) to quantify NPP in this region from 2000 to 2018. Investigation into the spatiotemporal dynamics and influencing factors was conducted using Theil–Sen median trend analysis and scenario analysis. The results indicate that the NPP in the YRD region from 2000 to 2018 exhibited pronounced spatial differentiation characteristics, typically exhibiting a spatial distribution pattern of being high in the south and low in the north, high in the west and low in the east. Additionally, the expansion of built-up areas and the reduction in cultivated land have the potential to reduce NPP in the YRD region. Moreover, the influence of land-use and land-cover change (LULCC) is anticipated to be relatively limited compared to that of climate change. Furthermore, changes in precipitation were found to be positively correlated with changes in NPP, with the effect being relatively more pronounced. The correlation between temperature and NPP demonstrated spatial differentiation, with a mainly positive correlation in the central and southern parts of the YRD and a mainly negative correlation in the northern part. Changes in solar radiation had a negative correlation with changes in NPP. Based on these results, it is recommended that local governments strictly enforce urban development boundaries and manage the disorderly expansion of built-up areas, enhance the regional irrigation infrastructure, and address air pollution, so as to ensure the necessary conditions for the growth of vegetation, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and control regional temperature rises. This study can provide stronger evidence for revealing the influencing mechanisms of NPP through the control of impact conditions and the exclusion of confounding factors via scenario analysis. The policy implications can offer insights into NPP enhancement and environmental management for the YRD and other rapidly urbanizing regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Communities and Sustainable Development in Deltas)
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20 pages, 11923 KiB  
Article
Water-Town Settlement Landscape Atlas in the East River Delta, China
by Jingyi Zhang, Xiaoxiang Tang, Zhao Yu, Suwen Xiong and Fan Yang
Land 2024, 13(2), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13020149 - 27 Jan 2024
Viewed by 722
Abstract
The water-town settlements in the East River Delta of China engage with the aquatic environment, establishing a comprehensive cultural–ecological system. However, rapid urbanization challenges the structural integrity of water-town settlements. Focusing on the East River Delta as the study area, we utilized the [...] Read more.
The water-town settlements in the East River Delta of China engage with the aquatic environment, establishing a comprehensive cultural–ecological system. However, rapid urbanization challenges the structural integrity of water-town settlements. Focusing on the East River Delta as the study area, we utilized the Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI), settlement morphology indicators, systematic clustering, and graph classification methods. We conducted a quantitative analysis of the spatial characteristics of water-town settlements at various scales, followed by formulating a sequence encoding based on landscape factors and constructing a settlement landscape spatial map. We characterized the landscape spatial structure of water-town settlements formed through the gradual evolution of morphological water network structures, retracing a prototype of water-town settlement landscape spatial structures. Results: ① Water-town settlements exhibit distinct uniformity in the landscape spatial features. The settlement landscapes conform to water network patterns, with streets and alleys aligning with water bodies. Crucial elements, including docks, bridges, and waterside farmland, are integral to this landscape. ② Water-town settlements undergo three progressive differentiation phases based on their location. The spatial distribution of settlements reveals three distinct landscape features influenced by the delta’s dynamic interplay between water and land. ③ Various regions exhibit three typical settlement layouts: upstream settlements are mainly clustered and linear, while midstream and downstream settlements, characterized by linear and strip-like features, align with the river’s course. These research findings offer preliminary insights into landscape spatial prototypes, contributing valuable perspectives to the conservation and design of water-town settlements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Resilient Communities and Sustainable Development in Deltas)
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