Managing Urban Green Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Contexts and Urban-Rural Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 1615

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: land management; property valuation; cadastre; land administration; GIS; SDI
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: cadastre; land administration; land governance; surveying; geoinformatics; land management; open data infrastructures; benchmarking
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture, Division of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, University of Zagreb, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: cultural landscape theory; inventory, analysis and evaluation of rural landscape; mediterranean dry stone wall landscape research; landscape typology and landscape character assessment approaches; landscape policies-legislation

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Land Surveying, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Krakow, Poland
Interests: land consolidation; land abandonment; land use change; remote sensing; geoinformation; land use modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce a Special Issue of Land on “Managing Urban Green Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services”.

Land, as a limited resource, demands effective integrated management. Achieving economic, social and environmental aspects in a balanced and integrated manner is a complex and challenging concept. Geoinformation-based decision making related to urban green infrastructure and ecosystem services (ESs) can be crucial to promote sustainable conservation and urban development. Integrated approaches to land management must efficiently assess and address various aspects to take advantage of the recent developments and trends in data science, and can be used together with widely available spatially enabled datasets within the framework of geoinformation infrastructure.

For this Special Issue, we are interested in contributions that link urban green infrastructure and/or ecosystem services and land management strategies with information-based decision making, good practices and different decision-making models at different levels. Although the roles and benefits of urban green infrastructure and ecosystem services are recognized and encouraged at the strategic level, for the purpose of efficient planning and monitoring, it is necessary to identify and model the indicators needed to efficiently monitor and evaluate the status of the establishment or improvement of urban green infrastructure and the connected ESs.

The focus of the papers submitted to this Special Issue may relate to—but are not limited to—the following themes:

ISO LADM: Land Administration Domain Model extensions concerning urban green Infrastructure and/or SE—exploring the integration and harmonizing with the principles of ISO LADM.

Urban Pre-parcellation (Consolidation) Strategies: investigating urban pre-parcellation techniques and strategies that enhance the implementation of urban green infrastructure.

Landscape Aspects in Urban Green Infrastructure: valuing economic, social and environmental aspects.

Assessments and Technical Aspects of Urban Green Infrastructure: exploring methodologies for valuing land and property within the context of urban green infrastructure.

Dr. Hrvoje Tomić
Prof. Dr. Miodrag Roić
Dr. Goran Andlar
Prof. Dr. Jaroslaw Janus
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • land management
  • urban green infrastructure
  • ecosystem services
  • geoinformation
  • decision making
  • sustainable urban development

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

28 pages, 6438 KiB  
Article
Your Favourite Park Is Not My Favourite Park: A Participatory Geographic Information System Approach to Improving Urban Green and Blue Spaces—A Case Study in Edinburgh, Scotland
by Charlotte Wendelboe-Nelson, Yiyun Wang, Simon Bell, Craig W. McDougall and Catharine Ward Thompson
Land 2024, 13(3), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13030395 - 20 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Access to urban green and blue spaces (UGBSs) has been associated with positive effects on health and wellbeing; however, the past decades have seen a decline in quality and user satisfaction with UGBSs. This reflects the mounting challenges that many UK cities face [...] Read more.
Access to urban green and blue spaces (UGBSs) has been associated with positive effects on health and wellbeing; however, the past decades have seen a decline in quality and user satisfaction with UGBSs. This reflects the mounting challenges that many UK cities face in providing appropriate public facilities, alongside issues such as health inequalities, an ageing population, climate change, and loss of biodiversity. At present, little is known about the preferences of different population subgroups and, specifically, the UGBSs they visit and the spaces they avoid. Using a public participatory geographic information system (PPGIS), the overall aim of the research presented here was to investigate the preferences of different population subgroups in urban areas, and the UGBSs they visit, using Edinburgh, Scotland as a case study. We created a baseline visitor demographic profile for UGBS use, and highlighted how visitors perceive, physically access, use, and engage with UGBSs. The results revealed considerable variation in UGBS preference: one person’s favourite UGBS may be one that someone else dislikes and avoids. It is clear that adapting UGBSs to suit local communities should not be a ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. The conflicting views and preferences of different groups of respondents point to the importance of developing policies and park management plans that can accommodate a variety of uses and experiential qualities within individual parks. PPGIS approaches, such as those utilised in this study, offer opportunities to address this issue and provide evidence to increase equitable UGBS usage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Managing Urban Green Infrastructure and Ecosystem Services)
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