A Livable City: Rational Land Use and Sustainable Urban Space

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Urban Contexts and Urban-Rural Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 8 August 2024 | Viewed by 1029

Special Issue Editors

School of Urban Design, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, China
Interests: regional sustainable development; spatial modeling; statistics; spatiotemporal analysis; land-use policy; sustainability in land management processes and urban planning; urban sprawl; coupled human-natural systems; environmental countermeasures
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Guest Editor
Department of Geoinformatics, Institute of Geography, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Stefanikova 49, 814 73 Bratislava, Slovakia
Interests: land-use/land-cover change; landscape fragmentation; urban dynamics; ecosystem services; remote sensing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept of livability in an urban context has increasingly become a central focus for researchers, policymakers, and urban planners. As the world’s population continues to urbanize at an unprecedented rate, the question of how to make cities more livable, sustainable, and equitable has risen as a key concern. Given this background, this Special Issue, “A Livable City: Rational Land Use and Sustainable Urban Space”, aims to contribute to this crucial discourse by advancing urban planning strategies and practices.

The notion of a “livable city” encompasses a wide array of components, including environmental sustainability, social equity, economic viability, and cultural vibrancy. Thus, it is highly related to the spatial organizations of an urban environment, society, and economy, which constitute the essential targets of urban planning. Therefore, the concepts of rational land use and sustainable urban spaces are critical when addressing the multifaceted challenges that cities face today. As such, this Special Issue invites contributions that shed light on innovative urban planning strategies, policy interventions, and practical initiatives demonstrating the potential to transform cities into more livable spaces. Additionally, through articles with various foci, including empirical studies, theoretical explorations, and methodology contributions, this Special Issue aims to comprehensively evaluate current trends, challenges, and opportunities related to the concept of creating livable cities. We seek to foster a multidisciplinary dialogue that can inform and inspire urban planners, policymakers, and geographers committed to the vision of sustainable and equitable urban development.

The scope of this call encompasses (but is not limited to) the following areas:

  • Strategies for sustainable land use;
  • The impact of land-use regulations;
  • Innovative approaches to urban planning, design, and architecture;
  • New methods in urban spatial planning;
  • Smart city technologies in urban infrastructure management;
  • Addressing equity and inclusivity in urban development;
  • Economic impacts of urban planning decisions;
  • Public participation and governance in urban planning processes;
  • Adapting urban spaces to climate change challenges;
  • Strategies for resilient urban infrastructure.

Dr. Yangyi Wu
Dr. Monika Kopecká
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • rational land use
  • sustainable urban space
  • urban planning and design
  • spatial optimization
  • public participation and governance
  • land-use policy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 10979 KiB  
Article
Environmental Inequality in Peri-Urban Areas: A Case Study of Huangpu District, Guangzhou City
by Jing Shen, Shaogu Wang and Yuyin Wang
Land 2024, 13(5), 703; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13050703 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 326
Abstract
This research investigates environmental inequalities within Guangzhou’s Huangpu District against the backdrop of rapid urbanisation and industrial expansion in Asia. This study identifies environmental hotspots, particularly in socially vulnerable areas characterised by high industrial density, using a vulnerability framework and analysing census and [...] Read more.
This research investigates environmental inequalities within Guangzhou’s Huangpu District against the backdrop of rapid urbanisation and industrial expansion in Asia. This study identifies environmental hotspots, particularly in socially vulnerable areas characterised by high industrial density, using a vulnerability framework and analysing census and pollution data. Utilising satellite imagery, urban planning documents, and field research, we delve into the internal environmental conflicts arising from industrial land use. Our findings reveal how diverse stakeholders, guided by their rationales and interests, collectively contribute to spatial inequalities within a market-driven context. Importantly, we emphasise that environmental inequality transcends mere conflicts of interest among stakeholders and is fundamentally shaped by the prevailing market-oriented spatial development model in peri-urban areas. This model results in urban segmentation, socio-economic stratification, and an uneven distribution of environmental risks and resources. Our study advocates for a paradigmatic shift in China’s peri-urban spatial development and the integration of environmental protection and social equity alongside economic growth. We recommend moving away from short-term speculative practices and promoting long-term, community-engaged urban renewal strategies that harmonise economic progress with improved living standards and environmental sustainability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Livable City: Rational Land Use and Sustainable Urban Space)
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17 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Effects of Affordable Housing Land Supply on Housing Prices: Evidence from 284 Cities in China
by Xue Han and Changchun Feng
Land 2024, 13(5), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/land13050580 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 415
Abstract
The policy objectives of affordable housing programs in China are two-fold: on the one hand, they are designed to assist low- and moderate-income families and reduce inequality; on the other hand, they are intended to lower commodity housing prices. However, the effects of [...] Read more.
The policy objectives of affordable housing programs in China are two-fold: on the one hand, they are designed to assist low- and moderate-income families and reduce inequality; on the other hand, they are intended to lower commodity housing prices. However, the effects of affordable housing land on housing prices, particularly the between-city variation and the mechanisms behind the market effects, have not been sufficiently examined, making it difficult to evaluate the housing policy and improve it accordingly. In this study, we address these gaps by using a prefecture-level panel dataset covering 2009–2020, obtained from national land and housing transaction information platforms. We use a threshold model to investigate the threshold effect of population size and a mediating model to uncover the channels through which the supply of affordable housing land affects housing prices. The results confirm that the affordable housing land supply can have a beneficial influence in terms of slowing down the increase in housing prices. The population size plays a significant role in explaining the between-city market effect variations. In cities with a population greater than 10.78 million, increasing the supply of affordable housing land would cause the housing prices to increase. Meanwhile, in cities with smaller populations, increasing the supply of affordable housing land could lower the housing prices. The underlying mechanisms of the market effects vary across cities with different population sizes. Although affordable housing land crowds out commodity housing land in all cities, housing demand diversion only exists in cities with a smaller population. At present, China is experimenting with city-specific housing policies; our findings imply that decision makers should explore additional policy options, besides building on incremental construction land, in order to make housing more affordable in supercities in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue A Livable City: Rational Land Use and Sustainable Urban Space)
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