International Finance and Monetary Economics: Theory and Empirical Analysis for Asia-Pacific

A special issue of Journal of Risk and Financial Management (ISSN 1911-8074). This special issue belongs to the section "Economics and Finance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 329

Special Issue Editor

Research School of Economics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia
Interests: macroeconomics; international finance; applied econometrics; political economy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue aims to bring together new research in the field of international finance and monetary economics. Both theoretical and empirical papers are welcome. Theoretical papers should address real world questions. Theoretical models developed should deliver testable hypotheses. Empirical papers should test hypotheses delivered by theoretical models, and strive to provide estimates of causal relationships. Analyses for high, middle, or low income countries in Asia-Pacific are particularly welcome for this special issue. The special issue will supplement existing literature by using state-of-the-art methods and recent data. The rapid rise in interest rates over the past two years in advanced economies such as the US, provides an ideal laboratory for exploring some of the most important questions in international finance and monetary economies.

Prof. Dr. Markus Brueckner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Risk and Financial Management is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • international finance
  • monetary economics
  • Asia-Pacific

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 1275 KiB  
Article
How Australia Has Been Affected by US Monetary and Fiscal Policies: 1960 to 2022
J. Risk Financial Manag. 2024, 17(3), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/jrfm17030096 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 200
Abstract
This paper uses Reiterative Truncated Projected Least Squares to estimate the effects of US monetary and fiscal policy on Australia using quarterly data between 1960 and 2022. When Australia had a fixed exchange rate (1960–1983), both US fiscal and monetary policies were positively [...] Read more.
This paper uses Reiterative Truncated Projected Least Squares to estimate the effects of US monetary and fiscal policy on Australia using quarterly data between 1960 and 2022. When Australia had a fixed exchange rate (1960–1983), both US fiscal and monetary policies were positively correlated with Australia’s GDP, which fits the predictions of a small-country IS/LM/BP model with relatively immobile capital. When Australia had a flexible exchange rate (1984–2022), US fiscal policy was positively correlated with Australia’s GDP, but US monetary policy was negatively correlated with Australia’s GDP, which fits the predictions of a large-country IS/LM/BP model. Full article
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