Personalized Therapy for Blood Disorders

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 July 2024 | Viewed by 2433

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Granada, Granada, Spain
Interests: mass spectrometry; proteomics; PTMs; metabolomics; leukemia; rare diseases; precision medicine; personalized medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Both adults and children can be affected by blood disorders such as anemia, hemophilia, blood clots and cancers. Among the latter, leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma are known to produce abnormal white blood cells, lymphocytes and plasma cells, respectively. Although an increasing number of treatments are being used to fight blood cancers (e.g., chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplant, immunotherapy and CAR-T cell therapy), disease heterogeneity can hinder the choice of treatment and its efficiency. Therefore, blood cancer patients might require more individualized disease management through the use of personalized medicine approaches.

This Special Issue aims to publish articles describing blood cancer heterogeneity and personalized care strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment response.

Personalized care can provide more accurate prognosis and therapy response predictions than standard procedures. Molecular descriptions by different omics technologies are powerful approaches to individual-based treatments.

I invite the submission of manuscripts describing personalized care based on the use of omics technologies to better describe diagnosis and prognosis as well as reviews on the latest uses of personalized medicine approaches. Debate on the implementation of personalized molecular approaches in the clinical setting and how patients could be integrated in the decision-making process is especially welcome.

Dr. Maria Hernandez-Valladares
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • blood cancers
  • omics technologies
  • personalized care
  • prognosis
  • therapy
  • patient-based decisions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 186 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue “Personal Therapy for Blood Disorders”
by Maria Hernandez-Valladares
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 339; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020339 - 15 Feb 2023
Viewed by 942
Abstract
This editorial of the Special Issue “Personal Therapy for Blood disorders” aims to draw more attention to blood cancer heterogeneity and personalized strategies for diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic treatment [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Therapy for Blood Disorders)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

18 pages, 1005 KiB  
Article
Effective Prognostic Model for Therapy Response Prediction in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients
by Maria A. Kolesnikova, Aleksandra V. Sen’kova, Tatiana I. Pospelova and Marina A. Zenkova
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(8), 1234; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13081234 - 7 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1044
Abstract
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder characterized by the malignant transformation of bone marrow-derived myeloid progenitor cells with extremely short survival. To select the optimal treatment options and predict the response to therapy, the stratification of AML patients into risk groups [...] Read more.
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder characterized by the malignant transformation of bone marrow-derived myeloid progenitor cells with extremely short survival. To select the optimal treatment options and predict the response to therapy, the stratification of AML patients into risk groups based on genetic factors along with clinical characteristics is carried out. Despite this thorough approach, the therapy response and disease outcome for a particular patient with AML depends on several patient- and tumor-associated factors. Among these, tumor cell resistance to chemotherapeutic agents represents one of the main obstacles for improving survival outcomes in AML patients. In our study, a new prognostic scale for the risk stratification of AML patients based on the detection of the sensitivity or resistance of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro as well as MDR1 mRNA/P-glycoprotein expression, tumor origin (primary or secondary), cytogenetic abnormalities, and aberrant immunophenotype was developed. This study included 53 patients diagnosed with AML. Patients who received intensive or non-intensive induction therapy were analyzed separately. Using correlation, ROC, and Cox regression analyses, we show that the risk stratification of AML patients in accordance with the developed prognostic scale correlates well with the response to therapy and represents an independent predictive factor for the overall survival of patients with newly diagnosed AML. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Therapy for Blood Disorders)
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