Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 4717

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 13400 East Shea Boulevard, Scottsdale, AZ 85259, USA
Interests: congenital heart disease; cardiac imaging and echocardiography; pregnancy and heart disease; Marfan syndrome and aortopathies

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Guest Editor
1. Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
2. Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA
Interests: congenital heart disease; pediatric cardiology; percutaneous catheter device closure; echocardiography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Patients with congenital heart disease are surviving into adulthood thanks to advances in diagnosis as well as therapy at an early age. In fact, there are more adults with congenital heart disease than children, with an ever-growing population. Educating and empowering patients as well as their primary care providers and general cardiologists are important for optimizing the patients’ longitudinal care. Moreover, recognizing that the interventions patients have undergone, whether surgical or percutaneous, are palliative means that, in most cases, these patients would require lifelong follow-up at a center with adult congenital heart disease expertise. Common long-term issues, depending on the cardiac abnormalities, can  include a need for re-intervention,  heart failure, arrhythmias, pulmonary hypertension, endocarditis, risk of thromboembolism,  and risk with pregnancy/risk to offspring. The guidelines for care of this specialized population are continuously being updated as the research in this realm is increasing. However, although the guidelines provide general principles of care, each patient may demonstrate unique features of their cardiac abnormalities and their care must be individualized.

Dr. David S. Majdalany
Dr. Donald J. Hagler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • congenital heart disease
  • adult congenital heart disease
  • cardiac abnormalities
  • personalized diagnosis and treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 171 KiB  
Editorial
Congenital Heart Disease: A Growing Population with Challenges to Patients and Providers
by David S. Majdalany
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(10), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13101442 - 28 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 710
Abstract
Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent disorder encountered in the newborn period and the most frequent cause of infant mortality [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease)

Review

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10 pages, 810 KiB  
Review
Personalized Approach in Transcatheter Palliation of Congenital Heart Disease with Duct-Dependent Pulmonary Circulation: Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Stenting vs. Arterial Duct Stenting
by Silvia Teresa Scalera, Alessandra Pizzuto, Pietro Marchese, Massimiliano Cantinotti, Eliana Franchi, Chiara Marrone, Nadia Assanta and Giuseppe Santoro
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(3), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14030302 - 12 Mar 2024
Viewed by 790
Abstract
Despite significant improvements in techniques, the treatment of neonates and infants with congenital heart disease resulting in duct-dependent pulmonary circulation is still significantly challenging. Despite current trends toward early primary surgical repair, temporary palliation is still necessary in those patients who are at [...] Read more.
Despite significant improvements in techniques, the treatment of neonates and infants with congenital heart disease resulting in duct-dependent pulmonary circulation is still significantly challenging. Despite current trends toward early primary surgical repair, temporary palliation is still necessary in those patients who are at high surgical risk for complete correction due to unfavorable clinical or anatomic characteristics. Recent advances in interventional cardiology have led to the emergence of right ventricular outflow tract and arterial duct stenting as cost-effective alternatives to surgical palliation in high-risk surgical candidates or whenever short-term pulmonary blood flow support is anticipated. This review aims to explore the evolving landscape of these transcatheter approaches, highlighting their role, efficacy and potential complications in the context of duct-dependent pulmonary circulation anatomies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease)
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17 pages, 956 KiB  
Review
Evaluation and Management of Sudden Death Risk in Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot
by Eiad Habib, Komandoor Srivasthan and Hicham El Masry
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(12), 1715; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13121715 - 15 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
Although substantial progress has been made to prevent sudden cardiac death in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients, ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Greater survival in contemporary cohorts has been attributed to [...] Read more.
Although substantial progress has been made to prevent sudden cardiac death in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients, ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Greater survival in contemporary cohorts has been attributed to enhanced surgical techniques, more effective management of heart failure, and increased efforts in risk stratification and management of ventricular arrhythmias. More recently, our understanding of predictive risk factors has evolved into personalized risk prediction tools that rely on comprehensive demographic, imaging, functional, and electrophysiological data. However, the universal applicability of these different scoring systems is limited due to differences between study cohorts, types of anatomic repair, imaging modalities, and disease complexity. Noninvasive risk stratification is critical to identify those who may derive benefit from catheter ablation or cardioverter defibrillator implantation for primary prevention. Ultimately, assessment and risk stratification by a multidisciplinary team is crucial to analyze the various complex factors for every individual patient and discuss further options with patients and their families. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease)
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12 pages, 2888 KiB  
Review
Anomalous Left Coronary Artery from the Pulmonary Artery: How to Diagnose and Treat
by Elaina A. Blickenstaff, Sean D. Smith, Frank Cetta, Heidi M. Connolly and David S. Majdalany
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(11), 1561; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13111561 - 31 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1711
Abstract
Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare coronary anomaly that can present in childhood or adulthood with a multitude of symptoms depending on the age of presentation. It should be suspected in infants presenting with [...] Read more.
Anomalous origin of the left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) is a rare coronary anomaly that can present in childhood or adulthood with a multitude of symptoms depending on the age of presentation. It should be suspected in infants presenting with heart failure in the setting of left ventricular systolic dysfunction and associated mitral regurgitation from papillary muscle ischemia. Adults with ALCAPA may present with cardiac ischemic symptoms. Prompt diagnosis with echocardiography and cross-sectional chest imaging is important to guide surgical intervention and improve the patients’ survival and prognosis. The goal of surgery is to establish a dual-coronary system with mid-term results revealing progressive recovery of left ventricular function and improvement in mitral regurgitation. Patients with ALCAPA should maintain life-long follow-up with a cardiologist with congenital heart disease expertise for surveillance of post-operative complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Diagnosis and Treatment for Congenital Heart Disease)
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