Personalized Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy in Chronic Upper Aerodigestive Tract Disorders

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 1050

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Unità Operativa Complessa di Otorinolaringoiatria, Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, 00168 Roma, Italy
Interests: larynx; dysphonia; botulinum neurotoxin in head and neck; dysphagia; swallowing; voice; neurolaryngology; laryngeal dystonia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Upper aerodigestive tract (UADW) disorders are among the most frequent chronic diseases. The UADW is a single anatomic tract that performs three different functions, including phonation, swallowing, and breathing, of which the last two are life-sustaining functions. Laryngeal disorders such as chronic sinusitis and otitis are just a small part of the entire list of the UADW diseases that also includes laryngopharyngeal reflux. The crucial position of this anatomical tract makes its pathology the subject of interest of different specialists such as gastroenterologists, otorhinolaryngologists, phoniatricians, and pneumologists. It is known that UADW diseases have a clinical and socio-economic impact because of the high prevalence in paediatric and adult populations.

The rapid development of new techniques and methods in recent years has led to great advances in diagnostics and therapy of UADW diseases. Nevertheless, chronic UADW disorders affect millions of people worldwide, and the number is expected to rise considerably in future years. Chronic diseases are biologically complex and driven by multiple mechanisms. They are  heterogenous in symptoms and co-morbidities, as well as in the way they are diagnosed over the course of disease. Currently, the diagnosis relies on clinical symptoms, standard instrumental assessments, or patient parameters. However, tests are often limited, imprecise, and occur late in the disease’s progression (i.e., obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS)). It is of paramount importance to improve patient outcomes with therapy. The aim of this Special Issue is to collect research that provides new methods for diagnosis, particularly for early diagnosis, or new targeting treatments for specific and earlier disease conditions.

Dr. Maria Raffaella Marchese
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • upper aerodigestive tract
  • swallowing
  • voice
  • rhinitis
  • sinonasal diseases
  • dysphonia
  • tonsillitis
  • peritonsillar abscess
  • OSAS
  • laryngopharyngeal reflux

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 599 KiB  
Article
Late Prevalence of Typical and Atypical Symptoms of Frey’s Syndrome after Parotidectomy for Benign Tumor
by Maria Raffaella Marchese, Federica Rossi, Stefano Settimi and Jacopo Galli
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 96; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010096 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 870
Abstract
Background: The treatment of choice for tumors located in the parotid gland is surgery. Nevertheless, postoperative complications are not infrequent. Regardless of the type of surgical procedure, the most common complication is Frey’s syndrome (FS). Traditionally, FS includes unilateral gustatory sweating and flushing [...] Read more.
Background: The treatment of choice for tumors located in the parotid gland is surgery. Nevertheless, postoperative complications are not infrequent. Regardless of the type of surgical procedure, the most common complication is Frey’s syndrome (FS). Traditionally, FS includes unilateral gustatory sweating and flushing of the facial skin lining the parotid compartment. Recent research describes atypical discomfort associated with FS. The aim of this study was to assess the late prevalence and severity of both usual and atypical symptoms after parotidectomy for benign tumors. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study involving 86 subjects who underwent superficial parotidectomy at least one year before the study. The questionnaire included the sweating–flushing–itch–paresthesia–pain (SFIPP) Frey scale supplemented by specific questions about symptoms. Results: Sixty-seven out of eighty-six (77.9%) cases reported almost one symptom. The most frequent symptom was itch (36/67—53.7%), followed by pain (35/67—52.2%), while 28/67 (41.8%) subjects complained of atypical symptoms without flushing or sweating. A desire to treat the discomfort was reported by 50/67 (74.6%) subjects. Conclusions: Late postparotidectomy local discomfort is not infrequent and includes both usual and “unusual” symptoms almost equally. Our results suggest the importance of informing patients about the occurrence of the syndrome and the available treatment options during pre- and postoperative counseling. Full article
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