Special Issue "Global Impact of COVID-19 on Stroke Care and Parkinson’s Disease"

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 July 2023) | Viewed by 4141

Special Issue Editors

Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, The Maurice Wohl Clinical Neuroscience Institute, King's College London, Cutcombe Road, London SE5 9RT, UK
Interests: Parkinson's disease; movement disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
1. Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Transilvania University, Braşov, Romania
2. County Clinic Hospital, Braşov, Romania
Interests: movement disorders; Parkinson’s disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the whole world due to an increased risk of mortality and morbidity, especially in vulnerable and at-risk populations. The context of an exponentially increasing number of patients infected with this virus has changed the clinical care of patients with various neurological disorders.

Aim and scope: We aim to publish articles describing a personalized medicine approach to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with stroke and Parkinson’s disease (PD).

History: Huge efforts have been made worldwide in order to offer the best medical care for patients with acute and chronic disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Several factors are known to impact the outcome of motor and non-motor symptoms in PD, as well as the evolution of post-stroke patients. The access to acute stroke units is time-dependent and represents a constant challenge. Monitoring patients with Parkinson’s disease which need assistance for current treatment is also challenging.

Cutting-edge research: Current hot topics in clinical practice include risk factors for contracting COVID-19 or for developing PD or stroke after SARS-CoV-2 infection, specific clinical manifestations, the impact on clinical care, the spectrum of long-COVID symptoms, and the role of telemedicine.

We are soliciting submissions of research papers, reviews, and communications for this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. K. Ray Chaudhuri
Prof. Dr. Cristian Falup-Pecurariu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stroke
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • COVID-19
  • thrombolysis
  • motor symptoms
  • non-motor symptoms
  • telemedicine
  • wearable devices
  • long-COVID spectrum

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Nocturia and Sleep in Parkinson’s Disease
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(7), 1053; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13071053 - 27 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Background: Nocturia has a high prevalence in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and is known to be a bothersome symptom for people with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Objective: to characterize nocturia in a sample of PwPD, in relation to sleep, fatigue and other non-motor symptoms (NMS). [...] Read more.
Background: Nocturia has a high prevalence in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and is known to be a bothersome symptom for people with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Objective: to characterize nocturia in a sample of PwPD, in relation to sleep, fatigue and other non-motor symptoms (NMS). Methods: we assessed 130 PwPD using a comprehensive battery of scales, which includes the Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire (NMSQ), International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Non-Motor Rating Scale (MDS-NMS), Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale version 2 (PDSS-2), Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), The Overactive Bladder Questionnaire-Short form (OABq-SF), and the Parkinson’s Fatigue Scale (PFS-16). Results: according to the positive answers to the item of the NMSQ related to nocturia, patients were divided into PwPD + nocturia, and PwPD − nocturia. Nocturia was reported by 112 patients (86.15%). Quality of life in PwPD + nocturia was worse than in PwPD − nocturia, according to the PDQ-39 scores (13.32 ± 9.00 vs. 26.29 ± 14.55, p < 0.001). Sleep was significantly disturbed in PwPD + nocturia compared to PwPD − nocturia, according to the total scores of various scales, such as PDSS-2, PFS-16. PwPD who complained of nocturia presented higher scores of several NMS. Conclusions: nocturia has a high prevalence in PwPD and it is associated with impaired sleep, fatigue, and reduced quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Impact of COVID-19 on Stroke Care and Parkinson’s Disease)
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Article
Restless Legs Syndrome in Parkinson’s Disease
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(6), 915; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13060915 - 30 May 2023
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Abstract
Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) might worsen sleep quality and quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Objective: The main aim of the present study is to explore the associations between RLS and sleep, quality of life and other non-motor symptoms [...] Read more.
Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS) might worsen sleep quality and quality of life in people with Parkinson’s disease (PwPD). Objective: The main aim of the present study is to explore the associations between RLS and sleep, quality of life and other non-motor symptoms (NMS) in a sample of PwPD. Methods: We compared the clinical features of 131 PwPD with and without RLS, in a cross-sectional study. We used several validated scales for assessment: the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS), Parkinson’s Disease Sleep Scale version 2 (PDSS-2), Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39), Non-Motor Symptoms Questionnaire (NMSQ) and International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Non-Motor Rating Scale (MDS-NMS). Results: Thirty-five patients (26.71%) out of the total PwPD met the RLS diagnostic criteria, without significant differences between male (57.14%) and female (42.87%) (p = 0.431). Higher total scores of PDSS-2 were recorded among PwPD + RLS (p < 0.001), suggesting worse sleep quality. Significant correlations were observed between the diagnosis of RLS and some types of pain (especially nocturnal pain), physical fatigue and probable sleep-disordered breathing, according to the MDS-NMSS assessment. Conclusions: RLS has a high frequency in PwPD and it requires proper management, considering its consequences on sleep and quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Impact of COVID-19 on Stroke Care and Parkinson’s Disease)
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Review

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Review
Hiccups, Hypersalivation, Hallucinations in Parkinson’s Disease: New Insights, Mechanisms, Pathophysiology, and Management
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(5), 711; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13050711 - 23 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1869
Abstract
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disorder and the second most common neurodegenerative condition. We report three common but overlooked symptoms in PD—hiccups, hypersalivation, and hallucinations—in terms of their prevalence, pathophysiology, and up-to-date evidence-based treatment strategies. Whilst all these three symptoms [...] Read more.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disorder and the second most common neurodegenerative condition. We report three common but overlooked symptoms in PD—hiccups, hypersalivation, and hallucinations—in terms of their prevalence, pathophysiology, and up-to-date evidence-based treatment strategies. Whilst all these three symptoms do occur in many other neurological and non-neurological conditions, early recognition and treatment are paramount. Whilst hiccups affect 3% of healthy people, their rate of occurrence is higher (20%) in patients with PD. Hypersalivation (Sialorrhea) is another common neurological manifestation of many neurological and other neurodegenerative conditions such as motor neuron disease (MND), with a median prevalence rate of 56% (range: 32–74%). A 42% prevalence of sialorrhea is also reported in sub-optimally treated patients with PD. Hallucinations, especially visual hallucinations, are commonly reported, with a prevalence of 32–63% in PD, and a 55–78% prevalence is noted in patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), followed by tactile hallucinations, which are indicated by a sensation of crawling bugs or imaginary creatures across the skin surface. Whilst mainstay and primary management strategies for all these three symptoms are carried out through history taking, it is also essential to identify and treat possible potential triggers such as infection, minimise or avoid causative (such as drug-induced) factors, and especially carry out patient education before considering more definitive treatment strategies, such as botulinum toxin therapies for hypersalivation, to improve the quality of life of patients. This original review paper aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the disease mechanisms, pathophysiology, and management of hiccups, hypersalivation, and hallucinations in Parkinson’s disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Global Impact of COVID-19 on Stroke Care and Parkinson’s Disease)
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