How to Undertake Personalized Assessments and Cures for Pain

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2024 | Viewed by 1847

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Psychology, International Institute of Behavioral Medicine, 41018 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: behavioral therapy; cognitive therapy; pain; social neurosciences; outcome measures; education; psychological well-being; integrated sciences

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Guest Editor
Medical Oncology Unit, University Hospital, University of Cagliari, 09042 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: pancreatic cancer; gastrointestinal cancer; clinical trials; predictive biomarkers; translational research; precision medicine
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pain is a complex experience, influenced by biological, psychological, and social factors. It is necessary to implement the awareness and personalization of pain evaluations and treatments to maximize the effectiveness of treatments and improve people's quality of life.

This includes the involvement of physicians belonging to different fields, psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and nurses.

The personalization of care represents a promising paradigm, by providing assessments and therapies tailored to each person's needs, thus leading to more effective and long-lasting results.

As for medical sciences, the focus is on pain related to musculoskeletal, neurological, and oncological diseases, across multiple disciplines. Regarding psychological sciences, the emphasis is given to cognitive-behavioral therapy, also including acceptance and commitment therapy, and pain management education. They are all expected to promote overall well-being.

Studies on the topic in the form of original research and reviews from scholars are welcomed.

Dr. Barbara Rocca
Prof. Dr. Mario Scartozzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pain
  • suffering
  • personalization
  • evaluation
  • treatment
  • outcome
  • medicine
  • surgery
  • rehabilitation
  • psychology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 325 KiB  
Article
Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain and Differences by Sex: A Longitudinal Study
by Xavier Pericot-Mozo, Rosa Suñer-Soler, Glòria Reig-Garcia, Josefina Patiño-Masó, Miquel Sitjar-Suñer, Afra Masià-Plana and Carme Bertran-Noguer
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(5), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14050496 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 591
Abstract
Background: The experience of chronic low back pain has a significant impact on the quality of life of affected people, resulting in difficulties in performing basic activities of daily living. Aim: To study the perceived quality of life of people affected by chronic [...] Read more.
Background: The experience of chronic low back pain has a significant impact on the quality of life of affected people, resulting in difficulties in performing basic activities of daily living. Aim: To study the perceived quality of life of people affected by chronic low back pain and the associated factors by sex. Methods: A prospective, longitudinal and observational design was used. Results: A total of 129 people (58.1% women) with chronic low back pain were studied. The mean pain intensity scores were of moderate severity (6.42 points), with a modest improvement at follow-up (6.17 points). Epidural nerve blocks were the most effective therapeutic intervention in reducing the intensity of pain. Participants described a negative perception of their health with regard to quality of life, with low scores for the two constructs both at baseline (health index, 0.444; perception of health, 38.76 points) and at follow-up (health index, 0.447; perception of health, 40.43 points). Participants had severe functional limitation scores (50.79 points). The results were significantly better among men. There was an inverse relationship between the average pain intensity (β = −0.304; p < 0.001), functional limitation (β = −0.466; p < 0.001) and mental health (β = −0.565; p < 0.001) and quality of life. Conclusions: The chronification of low back pain complicates people’s biopsychosocial adaptation to life. There is a longitudinal inverse association between pain and functional limitation and health-related quality of life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How to Undertake Personalized Assessments and Cures for Pain)
13 pages, 642 KiB  
Article
Perceived Health Benefits in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients with Long-Term Postoperative Headache: Insights from Personality Traits and Pain Coping—A Cross-Sectional Study
by Mareike Thomas, Hannah Führes, Maximilian Scheer, Stefan Rampp, Christian Strauss, Robby Schönfeld and Bernd Leplow
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010075 - 8 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 968
Abstract
Postoperative headaches (POHs) following retrosigmoid microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma (VS) can significantly impact patients’ perceived health benefits (PHBs). In this cross-sectional observational study, 101 VS patients were investigated. For the assessment of pain, the Rostock Headache Compendium (RoKoKo) and the German pain processing [...] Read more.
Postoperative headaches (POHs) following retrosigmoid microsurgery for vestibular schwannoma (VS) can significantly impact patients’ perceived health benefits (PHBs). In this cross-sectional observational study, 101 VS patients were investigated. For the assessment of pain, the Rostock Headache Compendium (RoKoKo) and the German pain processing questionnaire (FESV) were used. The perceived health benefits (PHBs) were assessed by the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) and Big Five personality traits were measured using the Ten-Item Personality Inventory (TIPI-G). We showed that 55% of the participants experienced POHs, leading to a marked reduction in overall PHBs compared to those without POHs. The correlation analysis revealed an association between decreased PHBs and elevated levels of pain-related helplessness, depression, anxiety, and anger. Positive correlations were identified between PHBs and action-planning competence, cognitive restructuring, and the experience of competence. Low emotional stability and openness yielded associations with pain-related psychological impairment. Hearing loss and facial paresis did not exert a significant impact on PHBs. The study highlights the influence of pain-related coping strategies on PHBs in long-term POH patients. Thus, coping mechanisms and personality traits should be assessed even before surgery for post-surgery pain prevention. The limitations of this study include a relatively small sample size, potential biases introduced by the overrepresentation of female patients, and the use of an online survey methodology. In conclusion, this research highlights that the interplay between headaches, PHBs, and psychological factors is also relevant in VS patients undergoing microsurgery. Short-term psychological interventions should therefore be taken into account to improve post-surgery adaptive coping strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue How to Undertake Personalized Assessments and Cures for Pain)
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