Personalized Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 5373

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, University of Padova, Via Giustiniani, 2, 35128 Padova, Italy
Interests: ENT; computed tomography; imaging; diagnostic imaging; audiology; PET imaging

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Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, Section of Otolaryngology, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy
Interests: tumors; metastasis; cancer biology; cancer biomarkers; clinical oncology; tumor biology

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Guest Editor
Department of Neuroscience DNS, University of Padova, Otolaryngology Unit, Treviso Hospital, Treviso, Italy
Interests: head and neck surgery; tumors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Treatment of the neck in head and neck carcinomas has been debated since years. The most recent guidelines suggest selective treatment of specific levels of lymph nodes. Moreover, some authors suggest to follow the so-called "T-N tract", in order to precisely identify the lymph nodes that have been or may potentially be involved by metastases. On the other hand, in some cases, selective treatment is not the best option, since PET imaging may enlight involvement of some lymph nodes that have previously resulted negative on CT imaging.

International guidelines suggest some standard treatment of the neck, but they are rapidly evolving, thus suggesting that that treatment is differently apprpached by clinicians.

This Special Issue aims to provide both an overview of the current practice regarding neck treatment and to open suggestions to possible future treatment, as both considered as more selective or demolitive.

We welcome the submission of reviews, and original research papers targeting any of these topics.

Dr. Fabbris Cristoforo
Dr. Paolo Boscolo-Rizzo
Dr. Giacomo Spinato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • head and neck cancers
  • lymph nodes
  • PET imaging
  • CT imaging
  • neck treatment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 874 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Supportive Care for Radiodermatitis in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Supplementary Analysis of an Exploratory Phase II Trial
by Tsuyoshi Katsuta, Ikuno Nishibuchi, Megumi Nomura, Miho Kondo, Takao Hamamoto, Tsutomu Ueda, Bilegsaikhan Batsuuri, Takashi Sadatoki, Nobuki Imano, Junichi Hirokawa and Yuji Murakami
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(9), 1387; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091387 - 16 Sep 2023
Viewed by 861
Abstract
Self-care demonstrated efficacy in preventing severe acute radiation dermatitis among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This prospective trial aimed to confirm the feasibility and safety of transcutaneous electrical sensory stimulation while examining the relationship between changes in [...] Read more.
Self-care demonstrated efficacy in preventing severe acute radiation dermatitis among patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma undergoing chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This prospective trial aimed to confirm the feasibility and safety of transcutaneous electrical sensory stimulation while examining the relationship between changes in self-care behavior through supportive care interventions and the severity of acute radiation dermatitis during CRT. Patients underwent assessments for dermatitis grading (Grades 1 to ≥3) and were interviewed regarding self-care practices. The self-care questionnaires comprised six items, and a point was deducted for each task that the patient could not perform independently. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the association between G3 radiation dermatitis and the lowest self-care behavior scores. Of the 10 patients enrolled, three experienced G3 dermatitis. During CRT, six patients maintained their initial scores and did not develop ≥G3 dermatitis. Meanwhile, three of four patients with decreased scores exhibited ≥G3 dermatitis. The group with ≥G3 dermatitis had significantly lower scores than those with ≤G2 dermatitis, suggesting that the inability of patients to perform self-care routinely may lead to severe acute radiation dermatitis. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the potential of self-care interventions in preventing severe dermatitis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer)
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10 pages, 488 KiB  
Article
Differences between Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Base of the Tongue and the Tonsils in Prevalence of HPV16 Infection, Its Type, and Clinical Features
by Beata Biesaga, Anna Mucha-Małecka, Anna Janecka-Widla and Krzysztof Małecki
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020361 - 18 Feb 2023
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Abstract
Regarding attempts to find de-escalation methods of treatment for patients with HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (OPSCC), there is an urgent need to identify new prognostic factors which allow physicians to differentiate the prognosis of these patients. The aim of the [...] Read more.
Regarding attempts to find de-escalation methods of treatment for patients with HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx (OPSCC), there is an urgent need to identify new prognostic factors which allow physicians to differentiate the prognosis of these patients. The aim of the study is to compare the incidence of transcriptionally active HPV16 infection and its type as well as other epidemiological, clinical, and histopathological features between SCC of the base of the tongue (BOTSCC) and tonsils (TSSCC). The analysis was performed in a group of 63 patients with OPSCC, for which, in our earlier studies, we assessed transcriptionally active HPV16 infection and its type (viral load and viral genome status). Transcriptionally active HPV16 infection was significantly more common in TSSCC (96.3%) than in BOTSCC (3.7%). Patients with TSSCC had significantly higher disease-free survival rates (84.1%) than those with BTSCC (47.4%); the same was true in the subgroup with HPV16 positivity. The obtained results are an important indication for further research on the development of new prognostic and/or predictive factors for patients with HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer)
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14 pages, 3044 KiB  
Article
Metallic Artifact Reduction in Midfacial CT Scans Using Patient-Specific Polymer Implants Enhances Image Quality
by Julian Lommen, Lara Schorn, Christoph Sproll, Valentin Kerkfeld, Adem Aksu, Frank Reinauer, Norbert R. Kübler, Wilfried Budach, Majeed Rana and Bálint Tamaskovics
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(2), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13020236 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1380
Abstract
Midfacial reconstruction after tumor resection surgery is commonly conducted by using autologous bone grafts or alloplastic implants. Titanium is the most frequently used osteosynthesis material in these cases but causes disturbing metallic artifacts in CT imaging. The purpose of this experimental study was [...] Read more.
Midfacial reconstruction after tumor resection surgery is commonly conducted by using autologous bone grafts or alloplastic implants. Titanium is the most frequently used osteosynthesis material in these cases but causes disturbing metallic artifacts in CT imaging. The purpose of this experimental study was to evaluate whether the use of midfacial polymer implants reduces metallic artifacts in CT imaging to improve image quality. Zygomatic titanium (n = 1) and polymer (n = 12) implants were successively implanted in a human skull specimen. Implants were analyzed for their effect on Hounsfield Unit values (streak artifacts) and virtual growth in CT images (blooming artifacts) as well as image quality. Multi-factorial ANOVA and Bonferroni’s post hoc test were used. Titanium (173.7 HU; SD ± 5.1) and hydroxyapatite containing polymers (155.3 HU; SD ± 5.9) were associated with significantly more streak artifacts compared to all other polymer materials. There was no significant difference in blooming artifacts between materials. The metallic artifact reduction algorithm showed no significant difference. Image quality was slightly better for polymer implants compared to titanium. Personalized polymer implants for midfacial reconstruction significantly reduce metallic artifacts in CT imaging which improves image quality. Hence, postoperative radiation therapy planning and radiological tumor aftercare around the implants are facilitated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer)
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Review

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25 pages, 1145 KiB  
Review
In Vitro Models of Head and Neck Cancer: From Primitive to Most Advanced
by Irina Arutyunyan, Enar Jumaniyazova, Andrey Makarov and Timur Fatkhudinov
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(11), 1575; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13111575 - 3 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1417
Abstract
For several decades now, researchers have been trying to answer the demand of clinical oncologists to create an ideal preclinical model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that is accessible, reproducible, and relevant. Over the past years, the development of cellular [...] Read more.
For several decades now, researchers have been trying to answer the demand of clinical oncologists to create an ideal preclinical model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that is accessible, reproducible, and relevant. Over the past years, the development of cellular technologies has naturally allowed us to move from primitive short-lived primary 2D cell cultures to complex patient-derived 3D models that reproduce the cellular composition, architecture, mutational, or viral load of native tumor tissue. Depending on the tasks and capabilities, a scientific laboratory can choose from several types of models: primary cell cultures, immortalized cell lines, spheroids or heterospheroids, tissue engineering models, bioprinted models, organoids, tumor explants, and histocultures. HNSCC in vitro models make it possible to screen agents with potential antitumor activity, study the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to its progression and metastasis, determine the prognostic significance of individual biomarkers (including using genetic engineering methods), study the effect of viral infection on the pathogenesis of the disease, and adjust treatment tactics for a specific patient or groups of patients. Promising experimental results have created a scientific basis for the registration of several clinical studies using HNSCC in vitro models. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Medicine in Head and Neck Cancer)
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