Clinical Management of Chronic Pain: Personalized Approaches

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2023) | Viewed by 3193

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Universidad de Jaén, Jaén, Spain
Interests: chronic pain; musculoskeletal pain; conditioned pain modulation; fibromyalgia syndrome; postural balance; manual therapy; virtual-reality-based therapy
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaén, Jaén, Spain
Interests: physiotherapy; virtual reality; augmented reality; mixed reality; neurorehabilitation; musculoskeletal disorders; postural balance; vestibular system; pain; cardiorespiratory rehabilitation; traumatic injuries; cancer; physiotherapy learning and teaching
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic pain, experienced by approximately 20% of the world's population, is a major public health problem with enormous social and economic impact. Since chronic pain is conceptualized in a biopsychosocial framework, it is best addressed by integrating different treatment approaches. In the context of the complex and not always well-known pathophysiological and psychological mechanisms behind clinical management of chronic pain, we would like to emphasize that patient preferences are important for treatment effectiveness and adherence. Multidisciplinary pain management programs often include multidisciplinary therapeutic strategies such as pharmacological therapy and technology-based approaches, which could be delivered through disease bespoke apps or combined devices. Therefore, innovate interventions that aim to achieve healthy levels of activity and self-management for people with chronic pain. We invite investigators to contribute original research, such as observational, experimental or systematic review and meta-analysis as well as case series that focus on innovative clinical treatment strategies that may aid in the management of chronic pain.

Dr. María Catalina Osuna-Pérez
Dr. Irene Cortés Pérez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic pain
  • musculoskeletal pain
  • fibromyalgia syndrome
  • conditioned pain modulation
  • virtual reality
  • wearable technology/device development
  • disease bespoke apps or combined devices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

23 pages, 851 KiB  
Article
Patient Experiences and Clinical Outcomes in a Multidisciplinary Perioperative Transitional Pain Service
by Divya Manoharan, Anping Xie, Yea-Jen Hsu, Hannah K. Flynn, Zodina Beiene, Alexandros Giagtzis, Ronen Shechter, Eileen McDonald, Jill Marsteller, Marie Hanna and Traci J. Speed
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010031 - 26 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 758
Abstract
Siloed pain management across the perioperative period increases the risk of chronic opioid use and impedes postoperative recovery. Transitional perioperative pain services (TPSs) are innovative care models that coordinate multidisciplinary perioperative pain management to mitigate risks of chronic postoperative pain and opioid use. [...] Read more.
Siloed pain management across the perioperative period increases the risk of chronic opioid use and impedes postoperative recovery. Transitional perioperative pain services (TPSs) are innovative care models that coordinate multidisciplinary perioperative pain management to mitigate risks of chronic postoperative pain and opioid use. The objective of this study was to examine patients’ experiences with and quality of recovery after participation in a TPS. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 26 patients from The Johns Hopkins Personalized Pain Program (PPP) an average of 33 months after their first PPP visit. A qualitative content analysis of the interview data showed that participants (1) valued pain expectation setting, individualized care, a trusting patient–physician relationship, and shared decision-making; (2) perceived psychiatric treatment of co-occurring depression, anxiety, and maladaptive behaviors as critical to recovery; and (3) successfully sustained opioid tapers and experienced improved functioning after PPP discharge. Areas for improved patient-centered care included increased patient education, specifically about the program, continuity of care with pain specialists while tapering opioids, and addressing the health determinants that impede access to pain care. The positive patient experiences and sustained clinical benefits for high-risk complex surgical patient support further efforts to implement and adapt similar models of perioperative pain care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Management of Chronic Pain: Personalized Approaches)
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14 pages, 1591 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness of Dry Needling versus Manual Therapy in Myofascial Temporomandibular Disorders: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial
by Rocío García-de la-Banda-García, Irene Cortés-Pérez, María del Rocío Ibancos-Losada, María del Carmen López-Ruiz, Esteban Obrero-Gaitán and María Catalina Osuna-Pérez
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(9), 1415; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091415 - 21 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1373
Abstract
Dry needling (DN) is an invasive physiotherapy technique employed for reducing myofascial pain. To compare the effectiveness of dry needling (DN) versus manual therapy (MT) in improving pain, active maximal mouth opening (AMMO) and cervical disability in patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular [...] Read more.
Dry needling (DN) is an invasive physiotherapy technique employed for reducing myofascial pain. To compare the effectiveness of dry needling (DN) versus manual therapy (MT) in improving pain, active maximal mouth opening (AMMO) and cervical disability in patients with myofascial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) were investigated against these treatments. A single-blind, randomized controlled trial was carried out. Individuals (n = 50) with TMDs were randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to the DN (n = 25) or MT group (n = 25). Each group received three sessions, separated by 4 days, of either DN or MT. Outcomes were assessed according to pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale), AMMO (cm), disability (Neck Disability Index), and pressure–pain threshold (PPT) (digital algometry) from the active myofascial trigger points. In both groups, pain and neck disability were significantly lower at the end of treatment compared with those measured at baseline (pain: −2.52 with 95% CI: −3.43 to −1.60 for DN group; pain: −2.92 with 95% CI: −3.77 to −2.07 for MT group; disability: −3.2 with 95% CI: −4.31 to −2.09 for DN group; disability: −2.68 with 95% CI: −3.56 to −1.79 for MT group), but not were not lower after the first session, without differences between the groups. AMMO was significantly higher after the first session (0.16 with 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.29 for DN group; 0.30 with 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.41 for MT group) and at the end of treatment in both groups (0.27 with 95% CI: 0.14 to 0.41 for DN group; 0.37 with 95% CI: 0.22 to 0.52 for MT group) compared with the baseline measurements. Finally, PPT results for the masseter and pterygoid muscles were significantly higher at the end of treatment in both groups (without statistically significant differences between groups), but not after the first session. The assessed therapies, DN and MT, are equally effective in improving pain, AMMO, cervical disability, and PPT in the muscles directly involved in the temporomandibular joint biomechanics of patients with myofascial TMDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Management of Chronic Pain: Personalized Approaches)
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13 pages, 1133 KiB  
Article
Comparison of the Severity of Zoster-Associated Pain and Incidence of Postherpetic Neuralgia in Patients with and without Pre-Existing Spinal Disorders at the Same Spinal Nerve Level: A Retrospective Multicenter Study
by Ji Seon Chae, Jiwoong Im, Yong Ju Choi, Hyun Jung Lee and Won-Joong Kim
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(9), 1286; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091286 - 22 Aug 2023
Viewed by 810
Abstract
The incidences of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) are significantly influenced by age. As individuals age, the occurrence of spinal disorders increases, thereby raising the likelihood of HZ and PHN coexistence. Considering this, our study aimed to explore the potential impact [...] Read more.
The incidences of herpes zoster (HZ) and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) are significantly influenced by age. As individuals age, the occurrence of spinal disorders increases, thereby raising the likelihood of HZ and PHN coexistence. Considering this, our study aimed to explore the potential impact of pre-existing spinal disorders at the nerve level where HZ developed, on the severity of zoster-associated pain (ZAP) and the incidence of PHN. For our investigation, we retrospectively analyzed a total of 237 patients who presented with HZ and ZAP at various sensory levels (cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral) with or without pre-existing spinal disorders. The presence or absence of spinal disorders at the sensory level affected by HZ was determined using computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Our study results revealed that the group with spinal disorders at the sensory level where HZ developed did not exhibit an increased incidence of PHN. However, 3–6 months after HZ onset, this same group showed significantly higher ZAP scores compared to the group without spinal disorders. It implies a need for heightened pain management, as the coexistence of these conditions can increase pain severity. This study furnishes an initial standpoint to delve into intricate interactions between two diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Management of Chronic Pain: Personalized Approaches)
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