Personalized Medicine in Metabolic Syndrome—Challenges and Opportunities

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 September 2024 | Viewed by 1443

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Geriatric Medicine, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, UK
2. Department of Medicine and HIV Metabolic Clinic, Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Eaglestone, Milton Keynes, UK
Interests: diabetes; diabetes in elderly populations; metabolic syndrome; HIV metabolic medicine; endocrinology in elderly populations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit papers to this Special Issue entitled Personalized Medicine in Metabolic Syndrome—Challenges and Opportunities. This Special Issue aims to familiarize physicians and researchers with the latest advances, opportunities and challenges in the field of metabolic syndrome from the prospective of personalized medicine. In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Metabolic syndrome and cancer;
  • Prevalence and risk factors for diabetes and obesity in children: Cross sectional study;
  • The Effects of Ramadan Fasting on Children and Young Adults with Type 2 Diabetes during COVID-19 Pandemic in the UK: Prospective Study;
  • Intermittent fasting and non-alcoholic fatty liver;
  • Hyperbaric oxygen as treatment for diabetic foot;
  • Role of pharmacist in the management of diabetes;
  • Unveiling the Promise of Personalized Medicine for Diabetes, Obesity, and Metabolic Syndrome: A Comprehensive Review;
  • From One-Size-Fits-All to Tailored Approaches: A Systematic Review of Personalized Medicine Strategies in Diabetes;
  • Bariatric surgery;
  • Thiamine deficiency in diabetes, obesity, and bariatric surgery: Recipes for diabetic ketoacidosis;
  • Divertuclosis and diabetes;
  • Interventional studies by pharmacists in the management of diabetes.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Mohamed H. Ahmed
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • metabolic syndrome
  • fatty liver
  • cancer
  • COVID-19
  • diabetes, obesity and children
  • diverticulosis
  • fasting

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 254 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Clinical Pharmacist Diabetes Education on Medication Adherence in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Interventional Study from Khartoum, Sudan
by Safaa Badi, Sara Zainelabdein Suliman, Rayan Almahdi, Mohammed A. Aldomah, Mohamed ELsir Marzouq, Eiman Eltayeb M. Ibrahim, Musaab Ahmed, Mohamed H. Ahmed, Habab Khalid Elkheir and Mohamed Izham Mohamed Ibrahim
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010074 - 8 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1166
Abstract
Background: Continuous therapeutic care with good medication adherence is the cornerstone of management of all chronic diseases including diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of clinical pharmacist intervention on the medication adherence in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: This [...] Read more.
Background: Continuous therapeutic care with good medication adherence is the cornerstone of management of all chronic diseases including diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of clinical pharmacist intervention on the medication adherence in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Methods: This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial conducted at a diabetes clinic located at Omdurman Military Hospital, Sudan. Individuals with T2DM attending the diabetes clinic within 1 year were selected. The sample size was 364 participants (182 control and 182 interventional group). We used a pre-structured standardized questionnaire and checklist to collect the data. Data were analyzed by using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) (version 28). Results: Majority, 76.4% (n = 278) were females, and they consisted of 80.8% (n = 147) of the interventional group and 72% of the controls. The mean age of the interventional group was 54.5 (±10) years; 31.9% (n = 58) of the interventional group had diabetes for 6–10 years, compared with 26.4% (n = 48) of the control group. Among the control group, the mean adherence score was 6.8 (±1.7) at baseline and it was 6.7 (±1.6) at the end of the study (p < 0.001), while in the interventional group, the mean adherence score was 6.8 (±1.7) at baseline and it was 7.4 (±1.5) at the end of the study (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Adherence score among the intervention group was increased significantly from baseline to the end of the study when compared to the control group. Full article
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