Special Issue "Fungal Infections in Animals"

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogenesis and Disease Control".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2023) | Viewed by 2187

Special Issue Editors

Department of Biological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Alfort National Veterinary School, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
Interests: unit of parasitology; mycology; parasite and fungal diseases
Department of Animal Production and Public Health, National Veterinary School of Alfort, 94700 Maisons-Alfort, France
Interests: husbandry; poultry avian; aspergillosis; wildlife; microbiology; mycology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In an era when the emergence of antifungal-resistant pathogens is challenging the understanding of fungal infections in animals, it has become increasingly urgent to uncover the mechanisms that enable opportunistic and pathogenic fungi to cause disease in domestic animals, wildlife, and, in some cases, humans. From yeasts to molds, this Special Issue on “Fungal infections in Animals” aims to collect leading research regarding the epidemiology, host–fungi interactions, fungal pathogenicity, and the development of therapeutic and preventive measures against fungal diseases in animals.

Studies related to the microbiota balance inside the animal host have confirmed the role of microorganism communities in the behavior, immunity, and genetics of the host. This Special Issue also welcomes information regarding the interaction between fungal agents and the animal host microbiota, the ability of microbial communities to behave as antifungal agents, but also the dynamics between fungal and bacterial microbiota on different body surfaces.

This Special Issue also aims to include studies pertaining to the population-level consequences of fungal infections threatening wildlife and food security, all of them being different aspects of “Fungal infections in Animals”.

Dr. Veronica Risco-Castillo
Dr. Pascal Arné
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mold
  • yeast
  • animal
  • pet
  • wildlife
  • bird
  • poultry
  • microbiota
  • antifungal
  • resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
First Isolation of Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Fungal Causative Agent of White-Nose Syndrome, in Korean Bats (Myotis petax)
J. Fungi 2022, 8(10), 1072; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof8101072 - 12 Oct 2022
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Abstract
White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), is a lethal fungal disease that affects hibernating bats in North America. Recently, the presence of Pd was reported in countries neighboring Korea. However, Pd has not been investigated in Korea. Therefore, [...] Read more.
White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), is a lethal fungal disease that affects hibernating bats in North America. Recently, the presence of Pd was reported in countries neighboring Korea. However, Pd has not been investigated in Korea. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the presence of Pd in Korean bats. Altogether, wings from 241 bats were collected from 13 cities and cultured. A total of 79 fungal colonies were isolated, and two isolates were identified as Pd using polymerase chain reaction. Of the nine bat species captured in 13 cities, Pd was isolated only from Myotis petax in Goryeong. Atypical, curved conidia were observed in two isolated fungal colonies. Although histological lesions were not observed by hematoxylin and eosin or periodic acid–Schiff staining, fungal invasion was observed in the tissue sections. Taken together, these results confirmed the presence of Pd in Korean bats and suggest the possibility of WNS outbreaks in Korean bats. This is the first report of the isolation and molecular analysis of Pd from Korean bats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections in Animals)
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Review

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Review
A Critical Review on the Dosing and Safety of Antifungals Used in Exotic Avian and Reptile Species
J. Fungi 2023, 9(8), 810; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9080810 - 31 Jul 2023
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Abstract
Antifungals are used in exotic avian and reptile species for the treatment of fungal diseases. Dose extrapolations across species are common due to lack of species-specific pharmacological data. This may not be ideal because interspecies physiological differences may result in subtherapeutic dosing or [...] Read more.
Antifungals are used in exotic avian and reptile species for the treatment of fungal diseases. Dose extrapolations across species are common due to lack of species-specific pharmacological data. This may not be ideal because interspecies physiological differences may result in subtherapeutic dosing or toxicity. This critical review aims to collate existing pharmacological data to identify antifungals with the most evidence to support their safe and effective use. In the process, significant trends and gaps are also identified and discussed. An extensive search was conducted on PubMed and JSTOR, and relevant data were critically appraised. Itraconazole or voriconazole showed promising results in Japanese quails, racing pigeons and inland bearded dragons for the treatment of aspergillosis and CANV-related infections. Voriconazole neurotoxicity manifested as seizures in multiple penguins, but as lethargy or torticollis in cottonmouths. Itraconazole toxicity was predominantly hepatotoxicity, observed as liver abnormalities in inland bearded dragons and a Parson’s chameleon. Differences in formulations of itraconazole affected various absorption parameters. Non-linearities in voriconazole due to saturable metabolism and autoinduction showed opposing effects on clearance, especially in multiple-dosing regimens. These differences in pharmacokinetic parameters across species resulted in varying elimination half-lives. Terbinafine has been used in dermatomycoses, especially in reptiles, due to its keratinophilic nature, and no significant adverse events were observed. The use of fluconazole has declined due to resistance or its narrow spectrum of activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections in Animals)
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