Coastal Erosion and Beach Protection in a Changing World Climate

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2021) | Viewed by 4349

Special Issue Editor

Department of Earth Science, University of Pisa, Via Santa Maria 53, 5624 Pisa, Italy
Interests: coastal morphodynamics; sea level changes; source to sink sediment transport; deltas; estuaries; facies analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Around the world, nearly 2.4 billion people live along the coast, and the population is constantly increasing. Many of the most populated megacities are located in coastal areas. The coast is a sensitive territory, due to its value in terms of social- economic interest, natural environments, and the presence of archaeological sites. Unfortunately, on a worldwide scale, many coasts are exposed to high vulnerability due to erosion effects—even despite coastal protection. Moreover, the threat of climate change—the worst sea-level rise projections, that would bring about a shift from coastal erosion to coastal submersion, and the increasing occurrence of extreme events—will make the protection and preservation of coastal zones a major challenge in decades to come.

The aim of the Special Issue is to publish the most interesting research related to the above subjects, to provide a rapid turn-around time in terms of reviewing and publishing, and to disseminate the articles freely for research, teaching, and reference purposes. 

The following list of subjects are encouraged to be treated, for publication, in high-quality papers:

Integrated coastal zone management

Mitigation methods

Physical processes 

Protections technique 

Anthropic pressure 

Case study

Geological perspective

Socio-economics impact

Ecosystems impact

Prof. Giovanni Sarti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal morphodynamics
  • sea-level rise
  • coastal management
  • beach protection schemes
  • beach erosion
  • coastal vulnerability
  • coastal engineering
  • marine biology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3270 KiB  
Article
Determining the Mineral Admixture and Fiber on Mechanics and Fracture Properties of Concrete under Sulfate Attack
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(3), 251; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9030251 - 27 Feb 2021
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 1407
Abstract
The concrete structure in the coastal area suffers from the combined erosion of sulfate and dry–wet cycles. In this study, in order to modify ordinary concrete, fly ash, slag powder, silica fume and polyester fiber are added separately. The crack resistance of concrete [...] Read more.
The concrete structure in the coastal area suffers from the combined erosion of sulfate and dry–wet cycles. In this study, in order to modify ordinary concrete, fly ash, slag powder, silica fume and polyester fiber are added separately. The crack resistance of concrete was studied through mechanical performance test and three-point bending fracture test of notched beam under sulfate dry–wet cycles. The load-crack opening displacement (P-CMOD) curve characteristics, fracture toughness and fracture energy of modified concrete after corrosion are calculated and analyzed. Results reveal that the P-CMOD curve of modified concrete after corrosion has gone through four stages of damage: initial bending section, proportional elastic section, stable expansion section and softening section. With the increase of dry–wet cycles, the overall corrosion resistance and toughening coefficient of modified concrete increases first and then decreases. Adding 25% fly ash can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of concrete in the initial stage. The addition of polyester fiber and slag is beneficial to the improvement of the instability toughness and fracture energy of the concrete in the later stage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Erosion and Beach Protection in a Changing World Climate)
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22 pages, 21619 KiB  
Article
Anthropogenic Impact on Beach Heterogeneity within a Littoral Cell (Northern Tuscany, Italy)
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020151 - 02 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2103
Abstract
In this paper the evolution of the Northern Tuscany littoral cell is documented through a detailed analysis of the increasing anthropogenic pressure since the beginning of the 20th century. This sector of the Tuscany coast has been experiencing strong erosion effects that resulted [...] Read more.
In this paper the evolution of the Northern Tuscany littoral cell is documented through a detailed analysis of the increasing anthropogenic pressure since the beginning of the 20th century. This sector of the Tuscany coast has been experiencing strong erosion effects that resulted in the loss of large volumes of sandy beaches. The anthropogenic impact on natural processes have been intensified by the construction of two ports in the early decades of the 20th century. Competent authorities reacted by building hard protection structures that tried to fix the position of the shoreline but offset the erosion drive downdrift. Therefore, in the last 20 years a regional Plan was undertaken to gradually replace the hard defense schemes with a softer approach, which involved a massive use of sediment redistribution activities. Many nourishments have been done ever since, using both sand and gravel. All these hard and soft protection operations have been archived in a geodatabase, and visualized in maps that clearly show the progressive change from hard to soft defense. This database may improve the approach to any future analysis of the littoral cell both in terms of research and management, while providing a practical example that may be easily replicated elsewhere. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coastal Erosion and Beach Protection in a Changing World Climate)
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