Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2022) | Viewed by 13333

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Via Androne 81, 95124 Catania, Italy
Interests: marine biology; vertebrate and non-vertebrate species; models for toxicological testing; biomarkers; immunohistochemistry; electron microscopy; emerging contaminants; nanoparticles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: marine biology; vertebrate and invertebrate species; animal models for ecotoxicity testing; use of biomarkers; immunohistochemistry; electron microscopy; light microscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biological, Geological and Environmental Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: marine biology; vertebrate and invertebrate species; animal models for ecotoxicity testing; use of biomarkers; immunohistochemistry; electron microscopy; light microscopy; cytotoxicity; teratogenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Measuring the bioaccumulation of contaminants and biomarker responses in aquatic organisms offers a great aid for providing useful information to environmental monitoring programs and environmental risk assessment. The purpose of this Special Issue is to select and publish high quality and impactful research articles on bioaccumulation, biomagnification, behavior and exposure biomarkers in aquatic organisms. Original and high quality research related to the various aspects mentioned previously is encouraged.

Dr. Maria Violetta Brundo
Prof. Dr. Roberta Pecoraro
Dr. Elena Maria Scalisi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioaccumulation
  • Biomagnification
  • Biomarkers
  • Xenobiotics
  • Water quality
  • Environmental pollution and monitoring
  • Risk assessment
  • Sea and freshwater species

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 3367 KiB  
Article
Multimarker Approach to Evaluate the Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields at 27 GHz on Danio rerio Larvae
by Roberta Pecoraro, Santi Concetto Pavone, Elena Maria Scalisi, Sara Ignoto, Carmen Sica, Stefania Indelicato, Fabiano Capparucci, Carmelo Iaria, Antonio Salvaggio, Gino Sorbello, Loreto Di Donato and Maria Violetta Brundo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 693; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040693 - 24 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1304
Abstract
5G technology aims to satisfy several service requirements, leading to high data-rate connections and lower latency times than current ones. 5G systems use different frequency bands of the radio wave spectrum, taking advantage of higher frequencies than previous mobile radio generations. To guarantee [...] Read more.
5G technology aims to satisfy several service requirements, leading to high data-rate connections and lower latency times than current ones. 5G systems use different frequency bands of the radio wave spectrum, taking advantage of higher frequencies than previous mobile radio generations. To guarantee capillary radio coverage, it will be necessary to install a huge number of repeaters since electromagnetic waves at higher frequencies, and especially microwaves at higher bands, exhibit lower capacity to propagate in free space. Since the introduction of this new technology, there has been growing concern about possible harmful effects on human health. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible short-term effects induced by 5G-millimeter waves on the embryonic development of zebrafish (Danio rerio). Fertilized eggs were exposed to 27 GHz using a non-commercial high-gain pyramidal horn antenna, and several endpoints were monitored every 24 h. As a result, exposure to electromagnetic fields at 27 GHz caused no significant impacts on mortality or on morphology since the exposed larvae showed normal detachment of the tail, the presence of a heartbeat, and well-organized somites. Exposure to 27 GHz caused an increase in the heart rate in exposed embryos compared to that in the control group at 48 h. However, this increase was not observed at 72 and 96 h. Finally, very weak positivity regarding exposed larvae was highlighted by immunohistochemical analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms)
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14 pages, 869 KiB  
Article
The Dietary Effects of Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) Extract on Growth, Hematological Parameters, Immunity, Antioxidant Status, and Disease Resistance of Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) against Aeromonas hydrophila
by Ghasem Rashidian, Khalid Shahin, Gehad E. Elshopakey, Heba H. Mahboub, Azin Fahim, Hiam Elabd, Marko D. Prokić and Caterina Faggio
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(3), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10030325 - 25 Feb 2022
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 3369
Abstract
Medicinal plants are increasingly used in aquaculture owing to their beneficial impacts on the health status of farmed fish. The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) extract on growth, immunity, antioxidant parameters, and resistance of [...] Read more.
Medicinal plants are increasingly used in aquaculture owing to their beneficial impacts on the health status of farmed fish. The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) extract on growth, immunity, antioxidant parameters, and resistance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) against Aeromonas hydrophila. In addition, in vitro antibacterial activity of the skin mucus of fish fed on nutmeg extract was evaluated against three major fish pathogenic bacteria through the standard disk diffusion method. Fish (17.27 ± 0.11 g) were divided into four groups and fed on experimental diets containing different levels of nutmeg extract, including zero (control), 0.5% (M1), 1% (M2), and 2% (M3) per kg diet. Results showed that nutmeg significantly enhanced growth parameters after a four-week feeding trial. Feed conversion ratio was remarkably reduced with the lowest value reported for the M3 group, whereas weight gain was notably increased in M2 and M3. No significant effect was found on the hematological profile, including mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and hematocrit, while the highest levels of red blood cells and white blood cells were found in the M3 group. Stress biomarkers, including glucose and cortisol, were the lowest in the M3 group. Serum and skin mucus immunological and antioxidant parameters were significantly higher in M3, followed by M2, where the highest resistance was also observed. In addition, skin mucus samples effectively inhibited Streptococcus iniae, Yersinia ruckeri, and Aeromonas hydrophila. Overall, the present results suggest that dietary nutmeg (20 g/kg diet) could be used as a growth promotor and immunostimulant in common carp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms)
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15 pages, 2492 KiB  
Article
Effects of the Fragrance Galaxolide on the Biomarker Responses of the Clam Ruditapes philippinarum
by Graziano Rilievo, Jacopo Fabrello, Marco Roverso, Sara Bogialli and Valerio Matozzo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(5), 509; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9050509 - 9 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2398
Abstract
The musk fragrance Galaxolide® (HHCB) is widely used in personal care and household products. Its large use leads to a continuous release of the compound into aquatic environments. Although some studies on the presence of HHCB in ecosystems and biota have been [...] Read more.
The musk fragrance Galaxolide® (HHCB) is widely used in personal care and household products. Its large use leads to a continuous release of the compound into aquatic environments. Although some studies on the presence of HHCB in ecosystems and biota have been conducted, limited data about its effects on organism biomarkers are available. This study aimed at investigating both cellular and biochemical effects of HHCB in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum. Mussels were exposed for 7, 14 and 21 days to 100 ng/L and 500 ng/L of HHCB in seawater, and the effects on haemocyte parameters and antioxidant enzyme activities in the gills and digestive gland were evaluated. In addition, the neurotoxic potential of HHCB and its capacity to cause oxidative damage to proteins were assessed. Overall, our results demonstrated that exposure to HHCB was able to induce changes in biomarker responses of mussels, mainly at the cellular level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms)
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19 pages, 2985 KiB  
Article
Response of Benthic Diatom Assemblages to Contamination by Metals in a Marine Environment
by Yuriko Jocselin Martínez, David Alfaro Siqueiros-Beltrones and Ana Judith Marmolejo-Rodríguez
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(4), 443; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9040443 - 19 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2306
Abstract
Studies on marine benthic diatoms in environments contaminated by metals are scarce. The typical structure of benthic diatom assemblages (species richness, diversity, dominance, dominant taxa) from undisturbed environments may be used as reference for contrasting with contaminated environments in order to observe how [...] Read more.
Studies on marine benthic diatoms in environments contaminated by metals are scarce. The typical structure of benthic diatom assemblages (species richness, diversity, dominance, dominant taxa) from undisturbed environments may be used as reference for contrasting with contaminated environments in order to observe how said assemblages respond to such disturbance. Thus, the Ho that the structure of benthic diatom associations and morphology of their frustules under contamination by metals would be normal, as in unpolluted environments was tested. To do this, concentrations of 24 metals were surveyed in a coastal zone impacted by mining residues, and the structure of benthic local diatom assemblages was described. Metal concentrations measurements for 15 metals surpassed the normal values of the upper earth cortex, seven were under the low range effect, and three (Cd, Cu, Zn) surpassed the medium range effect values. At a control site no element concentration was above the reference values for low range effect (LRE) or medium range effect (MRE) standards. There, diatom species richness (S) was high, particularly on seaweeds; where, 397 diatom taxa were recorded. In contrast, at the contaminated area 217 diatom taxa were recorded, but diversity (H’) ranged from 2.4 to 4.3. Relative high frequencies of deformed diatom valves mainly of Achnanthes spp. were recorded in contaminated sediments. In general, diatom taxocenoses presented a typical structure for non-contaminated environments. However, scarceness of specimens, lower S, and frequency of deformed valves suggest responses to metal contamination. For marine environments, the latter values corresponding to A. longipes may be considered a reliable reference to the response of benthic diatoms to metal contamination. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms)
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9 pages, 4910 KiB  
Article
Significant Differences in Intestinal Microbial Communities in Aquatic Animals from an Aquaculture Area
by Fulin Sun and Zhantang Xu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(2), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9020104 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3070
Abstract
While much attention has been given to the role of animal intestinal microbes, few studies have focused on microbial communities and associated functions in cultured aquatic animals. In this study, high–throughput sequencing was used to analyze intestinal microbial communities and functions in fish, [...] Read more.
While much attention has been given to the role of animal intestinal microbes, few studies have focused on microbial communities and associated functions in cultured aquatic animals. In this study, high–throughput sequencing was used to analyze intestinal microbial communities and functions in fish, shrimp, crab and razor clams. Alpha diversity analyses showed significant differences in intestinal microbial diversity amongst these aquatic animals, and that shrimp intestines harbored the highest diversity and species numbers. T–test analyses (p < 0.05) showed significant differences in dominant microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between all aquatic animals. Predominant intestinal bacteria included; Gammaproteobacteria, Fusobacteria, Mollicutes, Spirochaetia, Cyanobacteria, Bacteroidia and Bacilli. Similarly, anaerobic bacteria were highly diverse in animal intestines and included; Vibrio, Photobacterium, Cetobacterium, Propionigenium, Candidatus Hepatoplasma, Paraclostridium, and Lactobacillus. Principal co–ordinate analysis indicated that the distribution characteristics of intestinal microbes varied with animal species; in particular, we observed a high variability among shrimp intestinal samples. This variability indicated these genera had suitability for the different intestinal environment. Function prediction analysis indicated significant differences amongst different animals in the major functional groups, and that microbial functional profiles were strongly shaped by the intestinal environment. Thus, this study provides an important reference for future studies investigating crosstalk between aquatic animal hosts and their intestinal microbiota. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioaccumulation and Biomarkers Responses in Aquatic Organisms)
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