Assessing and Predicting Coastal Waves in a Changing Climate

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 June 2024 | Viewed by 2636

Special Issue Editors

Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Via Vitaliano Brancati 48, 00144 Rome, Italy
Interests: coastal engineering; wave measurements; run up; wave energy; SWAN numerical model; physical modelling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Via Vitaliano Brancati 48, 00144 Rome, Italy
Interests: wave monitoring; ocean wave measurements; wave parametric statistics; wave climate; meteo-marine parameters; climate change; extreme wave analysis; sea state; essential ocean variables; wave integrated monitoring network; wave buoys; wave radar; wave satellite

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Italian Institute for Environmental Protection and Research (ISPRA), Via Vitaliano Brancati 48, 00144 Rome, Italy
Interests: wave measurements; operational oceanography; network monitoring; environmental engineering; costal engineering; wave climate; climate change; open data; latent class analysis; extreme events; environmental statistics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The understanding of wave climate has greatly improved in recent years. There are now many numerical models that can accurately predict wave motion both offshore and onshore, and coastal engineering makes extensive use of them. In addition to modelling, there are increasingly sophisticated instruments that can measure waves. These include coastal accelerometer buoys, HF radars, resistive probes, capacitive probes, satellite radar interferometry, etc. There is even research into using seismic noise to determine wave heights. Future studies and research will aim to optimize and integrate information. Both measurements (direct and indirect) and numerical models will be given importance. The verification of wave forecasts and the inter-comparison of wave models will require highly accurate measurements.

Therefore, it is important to disseminate the most recent scientific knowledge on the assessment and prediction of coastal waves in a changing climate. To this end, this Special Issue accepts research papers that observe and analyze the sea state, wave energy, extreme weather phenomena in oceans, climate change and its effects on waves, numerical wave models, and field and laboratory wave measurements. However, emphasis should be placed on the integration of measurements and models, particularly in relation to extreme events and climate change.

Dr. Carlo Lo Re
Dr. Arianna Orasi
Dr. Marco Picone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ocean wave measurements
  • coastal wave
  • wave numerical modelling
  • climate change
  • wave energy
  • Medicane
  • tropical storms
  • storm surge
  • wave monitoring
  • wave parameter statistics
  • wave physical modelling

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

21 pages, 3835 KiB  
Article
Modelling and Clustering Sea Conditions: Bivariate FiniteMixtures of Generalized Additive Models for Location, Shape, and Scale Applied to the Analysis of Meteorological Tides and Wave Heights
by Lorena Ricciotti , Marco Picone, Alessio Pollice and Antonello Maruotti
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(5), 740; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12050740 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 512
Abstract
Modelling sea conditions is a complex task that requires a comprehensive analysis, considering various influencing factors. Observed and unobserved factors jointly play a role in the definition of sea conditions. Here, we consider finite mixtures of generalized linear additive models for location scale, [...] Read more.
Modelling sea conditions is a complex task that requires a comprehensive analysis, considering various influencing factors. Observed and unobserved factors jointly play a role in the definition of sea conditions. Here, we consider finite mixtures of generalized linear additive models for location scale, and shape (GAMLSSs) to capture the effects of both environmental variables and omitted variables, whose effects are summarized using latent variables. The GAMLSS approach is flexible enough to allow for different data features such as non-normality, skewness, heavy tails, etc., and for the definition of a regression model not only for the expected values of the observed process but also for all the other distribution parameters, e.g., the variance. We collected data on multiple sea-related and environmental variables in Ancona (Italy) from two Italian networks: the Sea Level Measurement Network (Rete Mareografica Nazionale, RMN) and the Sea Waves Measurement Network (Rete Ondametrica Nazionale, RON). Our main outcomes were the meteorological tides (often also referred to as “residuals”) and the significant wave height. Atmospheric pressure and wind speed were considered as main drivers of the sea conditions, as well as the fetch associated with wind direction, linking these variables to the outcomes through the definition of multiple linear predictors in a regression framework. Our results confirm the importance of accounting for environmental variables and reveal that their effect is heterogeneous, where heterogeneity is modelled by three distinct mixture components, each capturing different sea conditions. These findings contribute to a deeper understanding of sea state dynamics and provide evidence of a clustering structure characterizing different sea conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessing and Predicting Coastal Waves in a Changing Climate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 18265 KiB  
Article
Projected Trends in Wave Energy Potentials along the European Coasts and Implications for Wave Energy Exploitation (1976–2100)
by Irene Simonetti and Lorenzo Cappietti
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020239 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 948
Abstract
In the context of the efforts toward the technological development of wave energy converters, reliable estimations of the annual energy production that can be attained with a given device are fundamental for a sound evaluation of the related levelized cost of energy, which [...] Read more.
In the context of the efforts toward the technological development of wave energy converters, reliable estimations of the annual energy production that can be attained with a given device are fundamental for a sound evaluation of the related levelized cost of energy, which is crucial in the investment decision-making process. The lack of reliability in estimates of devices productivity can, in turn, be exacerbated by uncertainty in the available wave energy resource. The Climate Data Store of the Copernicus Climate Change Service delivers hindcast data and projections of the wave climate along the 20 m bathymetric contours of the whole European coastline, covering the periods 1976–2017 and 2040–2100. This work addresses the presence of long-term trends in wave power and the effect of these trends on wave energy exploitability and on the energy production of different wave energy converters to be installed along the Mediterranean, North African, and European Atlantic coastlines. The results show that the monthly variation in the wave energy resource will generally increase for most of the considered areas, up to double the current values in some locations. Wave energy converters will have to face more severe wave conditions, with relevant implications in terms of survivability. At the same time, the future annual energy production of the analyzed devices is expected to increase in many areas in the Mediterranean Basin (particularly in the nearest future scenario), as well as in the Baltic Sea and along the coasts of the UK and France and the north coasts of Spain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessing and Predicting Coastal Waves in a Changing Climate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

25 pages, 7362 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Unidirectional Wave Spectral Characteristics in the Northeastern Waters of Taiwan
by Wei-Ting Chao, Ting-Chieh Lin, Kai-Cheng Hu and Tai-Wen Hsu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(12), 2285; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11122285 - 1 Dec 2023
Viewed by 826
Abstract
Marine energy development has been actively promoted in recent years. Analyzing wave data in the surrounding sea areas is crucial for improving wave power generator efficiency. This study collected unidirectional wave spectrum data from the northeast coastal area of Taiwan (e.g., Pengjia Islet, [...] Read more.
Marine energy development has been actively promoted in recent years. Analyzing wave data in the surrounding sea areas is crucial for improving wave power generator efficiency. This study collected unidirectional wave spectrum data from the northeast coastal area of Taiwan (e.g., Pengjia Islet, Fugui Cape, and NTOU). It aimed to analyze the main wave types (i.e., wind waves, swell, or mixed sea) and their proportions during the northeast and non-northeast monsoon periods. The results indicate that swell waves dominate at the NTOU buoy, while wind waves dominate at the other two stations. In addition, the analysis of wave spectra ratios revealed a low percentage of unimodal spectra (only about 0.5%), and bimodal and unformed spectra presented as predominant. Furthermore, this study also introduced a brand new JW-J wave spectrum, which combines the JW and JONSWAP spectra to describe low-frequency (swell) and high-frequency (wind wave) systems, showing superior performance compared to the Torsethaugen spectrum. Finally, this research analyzed the JW-J spectrum parameters from the Pengjia Islet and Fugui Cape stations and applied these results to the NTOU bouy for effectively describing wind/swell wave variations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Assessing and Predicting Coastal Waves in a Changing Climate)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop