Advances in the Study of Coastal Processes and Wave Hydrodynamics across Multiple Scales

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1313

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Civil Engineering Department, Porto University Center (CUP)—Lusofona University & University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: coastal management; coastal phenomena; forecasting capacity; cost-benefit analysis of coastal erosion mitigation solutions, and the development of coastal numerical tools

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Laboratory for Civil Engineering (LNEC), Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: coastal hydrodynamics; sediment transport and morphological modelling; shoreline evolution; data acquisition and coastal monitoring; coastal hazards; coastal vulnerability and risk assessment and mapping; remote sensing of coastal parameters and bathymetry; nature-based solutions.
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratorio de Ingeniería y Procesos Costeros, Instituto de Ingeniería, Unidad Académica Sisal, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Sisal 97356, Mexico
Interests: surf and swash zone hydrodynamics; wave-structure interaction; coastal resilience; wave runup

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coasts are shaped by natural processes and anthropogenic interventions. They are exposed to subsidence and long-term processes (such as sea level rise, wave climate variability, and coastal sediment balance changes), some of which are linked to climate changes. Other natural processes act over short timescales (e.g., coastal storms, tectonic events), seasonal to annual timescales (e.g., summer/winter beach profile changes, beach accretion/erosion), over decades (e.g., El Niño Southern Oscillation), or even with unpredictable occurrences (e.g., hurricanes and tsunamis). Human actions generally affect the coast at multiple time and space scales. The accurate understanding of coastal processes at all these scales allows us to better inform coastal managers and reverse the negative impacts on the coast.

Wave hydrodynamics range from short-wave propagation, wave run-up and swash, short–long wave interaction, non-linear wave dynamics, and wave–current interactions, amongst others. The effect of these actions on sedimentary bottoms (mud, sand, and gravel), or at soft-rock coastal formations, govern sediment transport and coastal morphological changes.

This Special Issue is aimed at collecting and publishing the most recent advances in coastal processes and wave hydrodynamics. We welcome contributions from novel observational and experimental technologies, single and across-scale numerical modeling, theoretical developments, cross-shore and alongshore wave–current–sediment–morphology interactions and new datasets on wave hydrodynamics and coastal process experiments.

Dr. Márcia Lima
Dr. Francisco Sancho
Dr. Alec Torres-Freyermuth
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • numerical modeling
  • run-up
  • swash
  • non-linear wave dynamics
  • wave–current interactions
  • cross-shore and alongshore transport
  • wave–current–sediment–morphology interactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

27 pages, 16706 KiB  
Article
Cross-Shore Modeling Features: Calibration and Impacts of Wave Climate Uncertainties
by Frederico Romão, Carlos Coelho, Márcia Lima, Hrólfur Ásmundsson and Eric M. Myer
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(5), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12050760 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 443
Abstract
Numerical models can be powerful tools for evaluating the best scenarios for the construction of artificial nourishments to mitigate coastal erosion. Until recent decades, when looking at medium- to long-term simulations, cross-shore and alongshore processes have been studied separately. Accounting for both processes [...] Read more.
Numerical models can be powerful tools for evaluating the best scenarios for the construction of artificial nourishments to mitigate coastal erosion. Until recent decades, when looking at medium- to long-term simulations, cross-shore and alongshore processes have been studied separately. Accounting for both processes in a shoreline evolution numerical model would improve the understanding and predictive capacity of future changes in coastline evolution. The AX-COAST project aims to develop new capacities in modeling cross-shore sediment transport processes by adding the CS-Model, a cross-shore numerical model, into the existing LTC (Long-Term Configuration) model. The LTC model is a shoreline evolution numerical model which is a module of the cost–benefit assessment tool COAST. This work presents the first steps of the CS-Model implementation, which involve evaluating its performance by calibrating the model with extensive measured datasets of wave climate, beach profiles, tide levels, etc., from coastal areas in IJmuiden and Sand Motor in the Netherlands. The results show good agreement between modeled and observed values. Additionally, wave climate datasets derived from global and regional wave models were considered to evaluate modeling performance at IJmuiden. Using derived timeseries from the wave models did not significantly lead to different results compared to using measured data. The obtained mean absolute and relative errors for each profile were low for both types of datasets. Calibration processes with consistent data are important in modeling simulations to accurately represent the study area and ensure the credibility of future simulations. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

22 pages, 3721 KiB  
Review
Review of the Quantification of Aeolian Sediment Transport in Coastal Areas
by Paul Husemann, Frederico Romão, Márcia Lima, Susana Costas and Carlos Coelho
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(5), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12050755 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 624
Abstract
Coastal dunes, formed and shaped by aeolian sediment transport, play a crucial role in ecosystem services and act as natural flood and coastal erosion defenses. This paper delves into theoretical equations and numerical models predicting sediment transport. Numerical models like cellular automata, XBeach-DUNA, [...] Read more.
Coastal dunes, formed and shaped by aeolian sediment transport, play a crucial role in ecosystem services and act as natural flood and coastal erosion defenses. This paper delves into theoretical equations and numerical models predicting sediment transport. Numerical models like cellular automata, XBeach-DUNA, the coastal dune model, and others are analyzed for their ability to simulate dune morphology, erosion processes, and vegetation impacts accurately. Evaluated are field observation and measurement techniques, such as sand traps, impact sensors, and optical sensors, for their precision in quantifying aeolian dynamics. Further examined is the effectiveness of vegetation and fencing in dune stabilization, noting species-specific responses and the influence of fence design on sediment accumulation. These tools offer insights into optimizing aeolian sediment management for coastal protection. By conducting a systematic review and connecting theoretical, empirical, and modeling findings, this study highlights the complex challenge of measuring and managing aeolian sediment transport and proposes integrated strategies for enhancing coastal dune resilience against the backdrop of climate change and erosion. This study’s objectives to bridge gaps in current understanding are met, highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary approach to coastal dune management and conservation, especially combining wind- and wave-driven processes. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop