The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 12381

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Centre for Marine Technology and Ocean Engineering (CENTEC), Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: marine environment; ship dynamics; marine structures; safety and reliability
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Institute of Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Hydraulic Engineering and Environment, School of Civil Engineering, Polytechnic University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Interests: climate change; water resources; watershed management; hydraulic engineering; renewable energies; coastal engineering; coastal management
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Geosciences Department, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267, USA
Interests: paleoecology; rocky-shore ecosystems; island dynamics; phanerozoic sea-level changes; storm deposits; carbonate dune systems; paleogeography of Baja California (Mexico) and the macaronesian islands of the NE atlantic
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Division of Biomedical Food Research, National Institute of Health Sciences, 3-25-26 Tonomachi, Kawasaki 210-9501, Kanagawa, Japan
Interests: analysis of marine biotoxins; chemistry and etiology of marine biotoxins; epidemiology of seafood poisoning; ciguatera poisoning
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Institute of Marine Sciences, National Research Council, Venice, Italy
Interests: ocean waves; extreme events; air–sea interaction; wave–current interaction; climate; data analysis
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce that in 2023 we will be celebrating the 10th anniversary of JMSE, which has undergone an important evolution towards international recognition as a result of the many excellent authors that decided to submit their papers to the journal.

In 2022, the journal reached the landmark achievement of being ranked as Q1 in the category of “Engineering, Marine”, and Q2 in the categories of “Engineering, Ocean and Oceanography”, as a result of reaching an impact factor of 2.744. These results are especially relevant for the Ocean Engineering section of the journal, which includes the topics of Marine Engineering and for the different Oceanography sections.

We thank the authors, anonymous peer reviewers, editors, and all the people working in any way for the journal, as well as the readers and authors that have cited the work in this journal and contributed to its development.

To celebrate this anniversary, we are launching a Special Issue, “The 10th Anniversary of JMSE Review Collection”, which aims to include only review papers in the field of Marine Science and Engineering. We hope to collect a set of high-quality review papers that highlight the most recent advances in the fields of Marine and Ocean Engineering, Coastal Engineering, Oceanography, and Marine Biology.

Dr. Carlos Guedes Soares
Dr. Rafael J. Bergillos
Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
Prof. Dr. Markes E. Johnson
Dr. Naomasa Oshiro
Dr. Alvise Benetazzo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Review

30 pages, 3003 KiB  
Review
Coastal Management: A Review of Key Elements for Vulnerability Assessment
by Cesia J. Cruz-Ramírez, Valeria Chávez, Rodolfo Silva, Juan J. Muñoz-Perez and Evelia Rivera-Arriaga
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 386; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030386 - 23 Feb 2024
Viewed by 976
Abstract
Damaging and accelerated anthropization in coastal areas, as well as the need to adapt to climate change, means we must concentrate on improving management plans based on the diagnoses provided by coastal studies. Among these studies is the vulnerability assessment, obtained from evaluating [...] Read more.
Damaging and accelerated anthropization in coastal areas, as well as the need to adapt to climate change, means we must concentrate on improving management plans based on the diagnoses provided by coastal studies. Among these studies is the vulnerability assessment, obtained from evaluating a set of variables or indicators, which contribute to sustainable development. Since there is no single list of variables to consider in determining coastal vulnerability, 60 vulnerability studies from a period of 29 years (1994–2023), from across the globe, were consulted, and through a statistical mode method, the variables most used by multidisciplinary authors were identified. These studies were organized into groups: ecological, geomorphological, maritime climate, socioeconomic and legislative; creating sets categorized as the minimum indispensable, acceptable, and ideal variables. The results showed that most studies use between six and seven variables from only the maritime climate and geomorphological information groups. The number of variables used by individual studies, on the other hand, was not directly related to the scales (global, national, regional, local), but to the risks, such as flooding and erosion, it resolved. Only two studies included the minimum essential information for the legislative group, which is the presence of protected natural areas. Coastline displacements was the variable most used (43 studies), followed by the geoform type and the rate of sea level change (36), the wave regime (35) and the tidal range (33). The DSSs (Decision Support Systems) for coastal management were also reviewed, showing that these systems focus on a topic with a greater number of variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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17 pages, 1646 KiB  
Review
An Overview on Structural Health Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis of Offshore Wind Turbine Support Structures
by Yang Yang, Fayun Liang, Qingxin Zhu and Hao Zhang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 377; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030377 - 22 Feb 2024
Viewed by 759
Abstract
The service environment of offshore wind turbine (OWT) support structures is harsh, and it is extremely difficult to replace these structures during their operational lifespan, making their failure a catastrophic event. The structural health monitoring (SHM) of OWT support structures is a crucial [...] Read more.
The service environment of offshore wind turbine (OWT) support structures is harsh, and it is extremely difficult to replace these structures during their operational lifespan, making their failure a catastrophic event. The structural health monitoring (SHM) of OWT support structures is a crucial aspect of operational maintenance for OWT support structures, aiming to mitigate significant financial losses. This paper systematically summarizes the current monitoring methods and technologies for OWT support structures, including towers and foundations. Through the review of monitoring content and the evolution of monitoring techniques for supporting structures, it delves deeper into the challenges faced by wind turbine monitoring and highlights potential avenues for future development. Then, the current damage identification techniques for OWT towers and foundations are analyzed, exploring various methods including model-based, vibration-based, artificial intelligence and hybrid fault diagnosis methods. The article also examines the advantages and disadvantages of each approach and outlines potential future directions for research and development in this field. Furthermore, it delves into the current damage identification techniques for OWT towers and foundations, discussing prevalent challenges and future directions in this domain. This status review can provide reference and guidance for the monitoring design of OWT support structures, and provide support for the fault diagnosis of OWT support structures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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22 pages, 7827 KiB  
Review
Wave Energy Conversion through Oscillating Water Columns: A Review
by R. Gayathri, Jen-Yi Chang, Chia-Cheng Tsai and Tai-Wen Hsu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 342; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020342 - 17 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1258
Abstract
An oscillating water column (OWC) is designed for the extraction and conversion of wave energy into usable electrical power, rather than being a standalone renewable energy source. This review paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the mathematical modeling approaches employed in OWC systems, [...] Read more.
An oscillating water column (OWC) is designed for the extraction and conversion of wave energy into usable electrical power, rather than being a standalone renewable energy source. This review paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the mathematical modeling approaches employed in OWC systems, aiming to provide an in-depth understanding of the underlying principles and challenges associated with this innovative technology. A prominent classification within the realm of wave energy devices comprises OWC systems, which exhibit either fixed or floating configurations. OWC devices constitute a significant proportion of the wave energy converter prototypes currently operational offshore. Within an OWC system, a hollow structure, either permanently fixed or floating, extends below the water’s surface, creating an enclosed chamber where air is captured over the submerged inner free surface. This comprehensive study offers a thorough assessment of OWC technology in conjunction with air turbines. Additionally, the investigation delves into theoretical, computational, and experimental modeling techniques employed for analyzing OWC converters. Moreover, this review scrutinizes theoretical, computational, and experimental modeling methodologies, providing a holistic understanding of OWC converters. Ultimately, this work contributes a thorough assessment of OWC technology’s current state, accentuating its potential for efficient wave energy extraction and suggesting future research avenues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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13 pages, 2412 KiB  
Review
A Protein Phosphatase 2A-Based Assay to Detect Okadaic Acids and Microcystins
by Tsuyoshi Ikehara and Naomasa Oshiro
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020244 - 30 Jan 2024
Viewed by 772
Abstract
Okadaic acids (OAs) are causative agents of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. and Prorocentrum spp. Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins produced by some cyanobacteria genera, including Microcystis spp. Traditionally, toxicity detection and quantification of these natural toxins were [...] Read more.
Okadaic acids (OAs) are causative agents of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning, produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. and Prorocentrum spp. Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins produced by some cyanobacteria genera, including Microcystis spp. Traditionally, toxicity detection and quantification of these natural toxins were performed using a mouse bioassay (MBA); however, this is no longer widely employed owing to its lack of accuracy, sensitivity, and with regard to animal welfare. Therefore, alternative toxicity analyses have been developed based on MCs’ and OAs’ specific inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), using p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP) as a substrate. The assay is simple, inexpensive, ready for use on site, and can be applied to several samples at once. For OA detection, this assay method is appropriate for widespread application as a substitute for MBA, as evidenced by its alignment with the oral toxicity of MBA. In this review, we summarize the structure and function of PP2A, the inhibitory activities of OAs and MCs against PP2A, and the practical applications of the PP2A assay, with the aim of improving understanding of the PP2A assay as an OAs and MCs detection and quantification method, as well as its suitability for screening before confirmatory chemical analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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24 pages, 15955 KiB  
Review
Living on the Coast in Harmony with Natural Processes
by José Simão Antunes Do Carmo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(11), 2113; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11112113 - 05 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1447
Abstract
The coastal zone is a fascinating place that comprises the interface between sea and land. This interface, which is both very dynamic and sensitive, has been affected by strong urban and industrial pressures, and an increase in both traffic and recreational uses, leading [...] Read more.
The coastal zone is a fascinating place that comprises the interface between sea and land. This interface, which is both very dynamic and sensitive, has been affected by strong urban and industrial pressures, and an increase in both traffic and recreational uses, leading to the deterioration of natural habitats and the growing instability of residential areas. Added to this disruption is ongoing climate change, which will lead to rising sea levels and increased wave action. Another problem we are increasingly concerned about is ocean pollution, which has been one of the main causes of threats to deep-water coral reef areas. The main sources of pollution include oil spills and offshore oil drilling. The effects of pollution caused by oil spills can not only seriously affect the global environmental balance of our planet but can also, on a different scale, seriously affect the economy of countries whose main resources depend heavily on the sea. Wave energy has the potential to alleviate the world's dependence on depleting fossil energy resources. With regard to coastal protection, the development of ecological solutions to preserve ecosystems and address coastal processes as an alternative to traditional coastal protection structures (seawalls, groins and breakwaters) is becoming increasingly important. These structures, generally referred to as passive measures, are usually built to alter the effects of sea waves, currents and the movement of sand along the coastline, with the aim of protecting beaches, ports and harbors. The concerns outlined are critically addressed throughout this review article. All of them are highly relevant today and, as demonstrated throughout this article, are expected to grow even more and with much more pronounced consequences starting from the middle of the current century. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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18 pages, 4121 KiB  
Review
Progress on the Impact of Persistent Pollutants on Marine Turtles: A Review
by Michele Arienzo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(2), 266; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11020266 - 24 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5949
Abstract
The review examines the most recent advances on the effect of persistent pollutants on sea turtles. Research on this topic is still limited, especially that related to toxicity, since they are protected species and in vivo toxicity studies are difficult, with most studies [...] Read more.
The review examines the most recent advances on the effect of persistent pollutants on sea turtles. Research on this topic is still limited, especially that related to toxicity, since they are protected species and in vivo toxicity studies are difficult, with most studies carried out on deceased individuals. Besides toxicology, the review considers direct links to pollution sources, reproduction impact, health effects and biomarkers of pollution exposure. Little attempts have been made so far to gather data that would provide insight into the causes of the observed health trends. Considering this, studies correlating PPs accumulation with health parameters were also discussed. The review synthesizes the recent progress of the research on these topics and indicates the main urgent need of investigation to limit threats from anthropic pressure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The 10th Anniversary of JMSE - Review Collection)
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