Advances in Coastal Hydrodynamic and Morphodynamic Processes under a Changing Climate

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Coastal Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 2332

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of the Environment, Marine Sciences Department, University of the Aegean, University Hill, 81100 Mytilene, Lesvos, Greece
Interests: beach morphodynamics; coastal hydrodynamics; coastal engineering

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Guest Editor
Institute for the Study for Anthropic Impact and Sustainability in the Marine Environment, National Council of Research—CNR IAS, Rome, Italy
Interests: beach morphology; coastal morphodynamics; coastal processes; climate change; coastal hydrodynamics; constrained beaches; mixed carbonatics and clastic beaches; sea level rise; coastal adaptation; wave hydrodynamics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, approximately 40% of the world’s population is located within 100 kilometers of the coast, making a significant contribution to the global economy (an estimated USD 1.5 trillion per year, which is expected to double by 2030). Beaches are one of the most dynamic environments on earth. Changes in beach morphology (morphodynamics) are based on complex process–response mechanisms operating at various spatio-temporal scales, which are not yet comprehensively understood. Simultaneously, beaches form the first line of defense against marine inundation and flooding, providing effective protection to the coastal populations, infrastructure assets, and the other coastal environments they front. Beach erosion is already threatening the livelihood and the economic activities of many coastal communities; this is a phenomenon that is expected to proliferate in the future under the anticipated changes in hydrodynamic forcing (mean and extreme sea levels). Thus, understanding beach morphodynamics and providing effective solutions for appropriate coastal protection schemes has now become an urgent issue.

This Special Issue aims to compile the latest, most fascinating research and innovative approaches in the field of beach morphodynamics, focusing on coastal resilience and sustainability. The submission of high-quality papers for publication is encouraged in order to disseminate the articles freely for research, teaching, and reference purposes.

Dr. Chatzipavlis Antonis
Dr. Simone Simeone
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • coastal morphodynamics
  • beach morphology
  • coastal hydrodynamics
  • climate change
  • extreme sea levels
  • mean sea level rise
  • coastal processes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 34475 KiB  
Article
Hydrodynamic Modeling of Water Renewal Time and Potential Dissolved Matter Using TELEMAC: Applications to Shediac Bay (New Brunswick, Canada)
by Chinh Lieou, Serge Jolicoeur, Thomas Guyondet, Stéphane O’Carroll and Tri Nguyen-Quang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030461 - 7 Mar 2024
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Abstract
This study examines the hydrodynamic regimes in Shediac Bay, located in New Brunswick, Canada, with a focus on the breach in the Grande-Digue sand spit. The breach, which was developed in the mid-1980s, has raised concerns about its potential impacts on water renewal [...] Read more.
This study examines the hydrodynamic regimes in Shediac Bay, located in New Brunswick, Canada, with a focus on the breach in the Grande-Digue sand spit. The breach, which was developed in the mid-1980s, has raised concerns about its potential impacts on water renewal time and water quality in the inner bay. The aims of this study, using mathematical modeling approaches, were to evaluate the flow regimes passing through the breach and influences on the distribution of dissolved matter, providing insights into whether the breach should be allowed to naturally evolve or be artificially infilled to prevent contaminant stagnancy in the bay. The study considered three simulation scenarios to comprehend the water renewal time and the role of the breach in the environmental management of Shediac Bay. Results indicated that completely closing the breach would significantly increase the water renewal time in the inner bay, although the spatial extent of this increase is limited. However, the study identified some limitations, including the need to better define the concentration limit for considering water as renewed and the lack of consideration of dynamic factors such as wind and wave effects. Full article
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21 pages, 58703 KiB  
Article
A Four-Year Video Monitoring Analysis of the Posidonia oceanica Banquette Dynamic: A Case Study from an Urban Microtidal Mediterranean Beach (Poetto Beach, Southern Sardinia, Italy)
by Daniele Trogu, Simone Simeone, Andrea Ruju, Marco Porta, Angelo Ibba and Sandro DeMuro
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(12), 2376; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11122376 (registering DOI) - 16 Dec 2023
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Abstract
This paper investigates the dynamics of the cross-shore extensions of banquettes, a sedimentary structure mostly made by rests of Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile, in a sandy urban beach located in the Gulf of Cagliari, Italy, western Mediterranean. A video monitoring station was installed [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the dynamics of the cross-shore extensions of banquettes, a sedimentary structure mostly made by rests of Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile, in a sandy urban beach located in the Gulf of Cagliari, Italy, western Mediterranean. A video monitoring station was installed above the promontory south of the beach. We analysed a four-year image database and related these dynamics to wave and wind parameters (obtained from the Copernicus and ERA5 databases) from September 2016 to September 2020. Our results showed that banquette deposition occurred in concomitance with the presence of leaf litter in the surf zone associated with mild storm events. Erosion of the banquettes occurred during more intense storms. When leaf litter was not present in the surf zone, banquettes were not deposited even with mild storms. Wind can influence the banquette dynamics: under certain conditions of speed intensity, the banquettes may be removed offshore, supplying litter in the surf zone, or they may be covered by sediment. The permanence of the banquettes on the beaches also depended on their composition: when the banquettes were intertwined with reeds, their removal by the waves did not occur even during intense storms, and this sedimentary structure can protect the beach from flooding. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Monitoring of bar migration and its impact on swash dynamics on a dissipative beach with video imagery and field measurements
Abstract: In this contribution, the hydro-morphological behavior during energetic storm events of a microtidal dissipative beach that experiences erosional phenomena and is of high economic importance (Marmari beach, Kos island, Greece) is presented. The study focuses on the deposition and formation of the longshore sandbar under different recorded wind and wave conditions, while the evolution of the shoreline and the wave run-up maxima line is also investigated. To achieve that, a beach optical monitoring system (comprising of a video camera and a meteorological station) and a high frequency wave logger were deployed at the study area during the energetic winter-spring period. Pre and post-storm positions of the longshore sandbar and the shoreline are compared to investigate the storm impact on beach morphology, while swash maxima is examined in conjunction with the recorded waves approaching from offshore. Results suggest that the beach system showed significant spatio-temporal variability during the monitoring period. The position of the sandbar and the shoreline is controlled by the coastal hydrodynamic action (littoral drift), while a strong correlation is found when checking the distance between the shoreline and the sandbar.

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