Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Geological Oceanography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 15968

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Department of Historical Geology and Palaeontology, Faculty of Geology and Geo-Environment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, 15784 Athens, Greece
Interests: marine geology; climate changes; paleoceanography; geochemistry; petroleum geology; basin analysis; sapropels; coastal and open marine systems; environmental reconstruction; marine sediment dynamics
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Guest Editor
Department of Historical Geology and Palaeontology, Faculty of Geology and Geo-Environment, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis, 15784 Athens, Greece
Interests: paleoclimatology; paleoceanographic proxies; micropaleontology; integrated stratigraphy; marine geology; ocean dynamics; sea-level changes; marginal seas; astronomical frequencies in paleoclimates; extreme geological events
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Organization and Technologies of Service Activities, Institute of Tourism, Service and Creative Industries, Southern Federal University, 23-ja Linija Street 43, Rostov-on-Don 344019, Russia
Interests: stratigraphy; paleontology; tectonics; management of natural and mineral resources; geoconservation; geotourism; ecological law and climate change policy at local, national, and international levels
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geological oceanography has remained an important direction of international research, and the related investigations have significantly extended our understanding of the marginal seas and open oceans. On the one hand, these investigations add a geological time dimension to oceanography. On the other hand, they facilitate tracing the links between water objects and solid Earth, its dynamics, and life evolution. The scope of this Special issue includes (but is not limited to) the following topics: marine geology, palaeoceanographic reconstructions and modeling, living and ancient marine organisms of all groups and ages, tectonic evolution of marine settings, marine geophysics and geochemistry, deep sea sediments, coastal processes, ocean dynamics, and marine resources (ores, hydrocarbons, and geoheritage). Topics such as stratigraphical correlations, geological hazards, and human influence as a geological force (if linked to marine environments) also fit the scope of this Special Issue. The most methodologically innovative and internationally appealing contributions are welcome. These can be both global and regional in scope, and these can deal with all time periods—from the Archean to the Quaternary. It is expected that these research and review papers will mark the recent advances in geological oceanography and indicate new ideas, problems, and methods of investigation.

It is hoped that will be a dynamic Special Issue, and articles will be published as soon as the Reviewers and Editors are ready to accept them, without waiting for the final deadline for the Special Issue.

Dr. George Kontakiotis
Prof. Dr. Assimina Antonarakou
Dr. Dmitry A. Ruban
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine geology
  • paleoceanography
  • paleontology
  • marine sedimentary basins
  • oceanic floor
  • tectonics
  • seismic stratigraphy
  • marine geophysics
  • marine geochemistry
  • coastal zone
  • offshore hydrocarbons
  • marine geoheritage

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Published Papers (11 papers)

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Research

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24 pages, 9497 KiB  
Article
Net Transport Patterns of Surficial Marine Sediments in the North Aegean Sea, Greece
by Ioannis Vakalas and Irene Zananiri
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(3), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12030512 - 20 Mar 2024
Viewed by 592
Abstract
The spatial distribution of sediments on the seafloor reflects the various dynamic processes involved in the marine realm. To analyze sediment transport patterns in the North Aegean Sea, 323 surficial samples were obtained and studied. The granulometry data revealed a diverse range of [...] Read more.
The spatial distribution of sediments on the seafloor reflects the various dynamic processes involved in the marine realm. To analyze sediment transport patterns in the North Aegean Sea, 323 surficial samples were obtained and studied. The granulometry data revealed a diverse range of grain sizes of surficial sediments, ranging from purely sandy to clay. The predominant size classes were silt and muddy sand, followed by sandy silt and mud. However, there were very few samples that fell within the clay classes. The sorting coefficient ranged from 0.21 to 5.48, while skewness ranged from −1.09 to 1.29. The sediment transport patterns were analyzed based on the grain-size parameters (mean, sorting, and skewness). The results showed the variability of flow parameters involved in sediment distribution. River influx and longshore drift near the shoreline are the most significant factors affecting sediment transport. At the open sea, sediment distribution is mainly controlled by general water circulation patterns, especially by the outflow of low-salinity waters from the Black Sea through the Dardanelles and the Marmara Sea. The heterogeneity of sediment textural parameters across the study area suggests that seafloor sediments are further reworked in areas where water masses are highly energetic. It can be concluded that open sea water circulation controls sediment distribution patterns at the open shelf, while close to the coast, river discharge plays a key role. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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20 pages, 6463 KiB  
Article
Features of Seismological Observations in the Arctic Seas
by Artem A. Krylov, Mikhail A. Novikov, Sergey A. Kovachev, Konstantin A. Roginskiy, Dmitry A. Ilinsky, Oleg Yu. Ganzha, Vladimir N. Ivanov, Georgy K. Timashkevich, Olga S. Samylina, Leopold I. Lobkovsky and Igor P. Semiletov
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(12), 2221; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11122221 - 23 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 913
Abstract
This paper is devoted to the features of seismological observations in the Arctic seas, which are complicated by harsh climatic conditions, the presence of ice cover, stamukhi and icebergs, and limited navigation. Despite the high risk of losing expensive equipment, the deployment of [...] Read more.
This paper is devoted to the features of seismological observations in the Arctic seas, which are complicated by harsh climatic conditions, the presence of ice cover, stamukhi and icebergs, and limited navigation. Despite the high risk of losing expensive equipment, the deployment of local networks of bottom seismographs or stations installed on ice is still necessary for studying the seismotectonic characteristics and geodynamic processes of the region under consideration, the deep structure of the crust and upper mantle, seismic hazards, and other marine geohazards. Various types of seismic stations used for long-term and short-term deployments in the Russian sector of the Arctic Ocean, as well as various schemes and workflows for their deployment/recovery, are described. The characteristics of seafloor seismic noise and their features are also considered. The results of deployments demonstrate that the characteristics of the stations make it possible to reliably record earthquake signals and seismic noise. Based on the experience gained, it was concluded that the preferred schemes for deploying ocean-bottom seismographs are those in which their subsequent recovery does not depend on their power resources. Usually, such schemes allow for the possibility of dismantling stations via trawling and are suitable for the shelf depths of the sea. The advantages of such schemes include the possibility of installing additional hydrophysical and hydrobiological equipment. When using pop-up ocean-bottom seismographs, special attention should be paid to the careful planning of the recovery because its success depends on the possibility of a passage to the deployment site, which is not always possible due to changing meteorological and ice conditions. Seismic records obtained on the seafloor are characterized by a high noise level, especially during periods of time when there is no ice cover. Therefore, it is recommended to install bottom stations for periods of time when ice cover is present. The frequency range of the prevailing noise significantly overlaps with the frequency range of earthquake signals that must be taken into account when processing bottom seismic records. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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16 pages, 3524 KiB  
Article
The Biotoxic Effects of Ag Nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Skeletonema costatum, a Typical Bloom Alga Species in Coastal Areas
by Ke Shi, Yuehong Yao, Jianliang Xue, Dongle Cheng and Bo Wang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(10), 1941; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11101941 - 8 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1071
Abstract
With the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have been widely utilized in many industries and daily life applications due to their unique properties. However, their potential release and the human health/environmental consequences have raised public concern greatly. In this study, we compared the [...] Read more.
With the rapid development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials have been widely utilized in many industries and daily life applications due to their unique properties. However, their potential release and the human health/environmental consequences have raised public concern greatly. In this study, we compared the toxic effects of AgNPs and AgNO3 on Skeletonema costatum in 10, 100, and 500 μg·L−1 Ag treatments. In all the AgNP exposure experiments, cell membrane damage and growth inhibition occurred. However, the cellular damage only obviously appears on exposure to a high concentration of AgNO3. The antioxidant enzyme (SOD and CAT) activities and lipid peroxidation in Skeletonema costatum were also induced significantly in the AgNP treatments. In addition, the percentage of Ag release in seawater increased with the increase in AgNP concentrations (13%, 32% for 100 and 500 μg·L−1 AgNPs). Thus, the biotoxic effects of AgNPs were found to be due to a combination of the solubilization of particles into toxic metal ions and the nature of the nanoparticles. It was worth noting that the induction of oxidative stress and damage to the cell membrane comprised the dominant mechanism of toxicity for AgNPs. Therefore, the behavior of nanometals in seawater affects the biotoxic effect on the phytoplankton. These results shed light on the biological toxicity of nanometals and their possible toxicity mechanism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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14 pages, 1722 KiB  
Article
Ordovician Tsunamis: Summary of Hypotheses and Implications for Geoheritage Resources
by Dmitry A. Ruban and Natalia N. Yashalova
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(9), 1764; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11091764 - 9 Sep 2023
Viewed by 926
Abstract
Ordovician tsunamis have been hypothesized for more than 25 years, but the related knowledge is yet to be systematized. The published sources bearing the pieces of this knowledge were collected in the course of the specialized bibliographical survey, and these pieces of evidence [...] Read more.
Ordovician tsunamis have been hypothesized for more than 25 years, but the related knowledge is yet to be systematized. The published sources bearing the pieces of this knowledge were collected in the course of the specialized bibliographical survey, and these pieces of evidence were summarized and interpreted with special attention to the spatiotemporal distribution of Ordovician tsunamis. It is found that the latter were reported from many places of the world (24 localities are established), which represent the Gondwana periphery, some isolated continental blocks, and terranes. Tsunamis were hypothesized for all epochs of the considered period, but the evidence is especially numerous for the Middle Ordovician. The degree of certainty of the interpretations of these tsunamis is chiefly moderate. It appears that only a tiny portion of Ordovician tsunamis is known, but the amount of available information is expected, taking into account the possibility of finding very ancient tsunamis. The outcomes of this study contribute to a better awareness of the world’s geoheritage resources. The established localities representing Ordovician tsunamis can be considered potential geosites, two of which are promising start points for further, field-based research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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18 pages, 2950 KiB  
Article
Provenance of the Lower Jurassic Badaowan and Sangonghe Formations in Dongdaohaizi Depression, Junggar Basin, and Its Constraint on the Karamaili Ocean
by Yangjun Gao, Guanlong Zhang, Songtao Li, Ruichao Guo, Zhiping Zeng, Shiwei Cheng, Zelei Xue, Ling Li, Huilian Zhou, Shengqian Liu and Furong Li
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(7), 1375; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11071375 - 5 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1009
Abstract
The Paleo-Asian Ocean controlled the tectonic evolution of Northeast Asia and formed the Karamaili Orogenic Belt in the eastern Junggar basin. However, the chronological constrain of the evolution of the paleo-Karamaili Ocean remains unclear. In this study, we focused on the sandstones of [...] Read more.
The Paleo-Asian Ocean controlled the tectonic evolution of Northeast Asia and formed the Karamaili Orogenic Belt in the eastern Junggar basin. However, the chronological constrain of the evolution of the paleo-Karamaili Ocean remains unclear. In this study, we focused on the sandstones of the Lower Jurassic Badaowan and Sangonghe Formations in the Dongdaohaizi Depression, Junggar basin near the Karamaili orogenic belt. After detailed observations and descriptions of the macroscopic features of the sandstone, we obtained information on petrology and geochronology. The Dickinson diagrams indicate that the provenance area had the characteristics of a transitional and recycling provenance, which is a collisional orogenic belt with a background of oceanic-continental subduction. The detrital zircon ages of the Lower Jurassic sediments in the Dongdaohaizi Depression can be divided into three peaks: ~300 Ma, ~420 Ma, and ~510 Ma for Badaowan Formation and ~310 Ma, ~410 Ma, and ~500 Ma for Sangonghe Formation. The youngest detrital zircon age is 241 ± 2 Ma, representing an Early Permian depositional age. Combined with previous studies, the sediments in the study area represent a provenance from the Karamaili Ocean. During the Early Jurassic, the consistent subduction of the residual East Junggar Ocean induced continuous uplift in the Karamaili region, resulting in an increasing exposure of deep-seated rocks to provide sedimentary material. According to the tectonic background of the Junggar region, the results indicate that the Karamaili Ocean, as part of the Paleo-Asian Ocean, experienced three evolutionary stages: Cambrian-Early Silurian (460–540 Ma), Late Silurian-Early Carboniferous (360–440 Ma), and Late Carboniferous–Triassic (240–340 Ma). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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28 pages, 59211 KiB  
Article
Sedimentological, Diagenetic, and Sequence Stratigraphic Controls on the Shallow to Marginal Marine Carbonates of the Middle Jurassic Samana Suk Formation, North Pakistan
by Shazia Qamar, Mumtaz Muhammad Shah, Hammad Tariq Janjuhah, George Kontakiotis, Amir Shahzad and Evangelia Besiou
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(6), 1230; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11061230 - 15 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1875
Abstract
This study presents a thorough analysis of the sedimentology, diagenesis, and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic Samana Suk Formation in the Hazara Basin of northern Pakistan. Focusing on two sections, namely Mera Rehmat and Por Miana, the research aims to unravel the [...] Read more.
This study presents a thorough analysis of the sedimentology, diagenesis, and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic Samana Suk Formation in the Hazara Basin of northern Pakistan. Focusing on two sections, namely Mera Rehmat and Por Miana, the research aims to unravel the complex geological processes within the formation. The examination of microfacies reveals nine distinct depositional textures, ranging from mudstone to wackestone, packstone, and grainstone, indicating various inner ramp environments such as open marine, lagoon, and coastal settings. Petrographic investigations shed light on diagenetic processes, including micritization, cementation, dissolution, compaction, neomorphism, and dolomitization. Six cementation types are identified, and the dolomitization patterns vary, providing insights into lagoonal environments and mudstone replacement. Sequence stratigraphic analysis uncovers intriguing patterns within the Samana Suk Formation. The high-stand system tract is characterized by mudstones, pelloidal grainstones, and dolomitized mudstones, indicating periods of high sea level. In contrast, the transgressive system tract displays ooidal grainstones, pelloidal packstones, and pel-bioclastic grainstones, representing transgression and inundation of previously exposed areas. A significant finding is the impact of diagenesis on reservoir quality parameters, specifically porosity, and permeability. Diagenetic processes, cementation types, and dolomitization patterns have significantly altered the pore network, highlighting the importance of considering diagenesis in assessing the Samana Suk Formation as a hydrocarbon reservoir. This research provides a comprehensive understanding of the sedimentology, diagenesis, and sequence stratigraphy of the Middle Jurassic Samana Suk Formation. The findings contribute to our knowledge of similar carbonate reservoirs globally, enhancing the exploration and development of hydrocarbon resources in comparable depositional environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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13 pages, 5712 KiB  
Article
Numerical Simulation-Based Analysis of Seafloor Hydrothermal Plumes: A Case Study of the Wocan-1 Hydrothermal Field, Carlsberg Ridge, Northwest Indian Ocean
by Kanghao Wang, Xiqiu Han, Yejian Wang, Yiyang Cai, Zhongyan Qiu and Xiaoquan Zheng
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(5), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11051070 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1367
Abstract
Understanding the dynamics of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes and the depositional pattern of hydrothermal particles is essential for tracking the submarine hydrothermal venting site, prospecting polymetallic sulfide resources, as well as deciphering biogeochemistry cycling of marine elements. In this paper, a numerical model of [...] Read more.
Understanding the dynamics of deep-sea hydrothermal plumes and the depositional pattern of hydrothermal particles is essential for tracking the submarine hydrothermal venting site, prospecting polymetallic sulfide resources, as well as deciphering biogeochemistry cycling of marine elements. In this paper, a numerical model of the deep-sea hydrothermal plume is established based on the topography and long-term current monitoring data of the Wocan-1 hydrothermal field (WHF-1), Carlsberg Ridge, Northwest Indian Ocean. The model allows for a reconstruction of the hydrothermal plume in terms of its structure, velocity field, and temperature field. The relationships between the maximum height of the rising plume and the background current velocity, and between the height of the neutral-buoyancy layer and the background current velocity are established, respectively. The transport patterns of the hydrothermal particles and their controlling factors are revealed. Using hydrothermal particles with a density of ~5000 kg/m3 (i.e., pyrite grains) as an example, it is found that pyrite larger than 1 mm can only be found near the venting site. Those in the size 0.3–0.5 mm can only be found within 137–240 m from the venting site, while those smaller than 0.2 mm can be transported over long distances of more than 1 km. Using the vertical temperature profiling data of WHF-1 obtained during the Jiaolong submersible diving cruise in March 2017, we reconstruct the past current velocity of 10 cm/s, similar to the current data retrieved from the observational mooring system. Our model and the findings contribute to a better understanding of the hydrothermal system of WHF-1, and provide useful information for tracing the hydrothermal vents, prospecting the submarine polymetallic sulfide resources, designing the long-term observation networks, and relevant studies on element cycling and energy budget. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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21 pages, 20239 KiB  
Article
New Insights into the Seamount Structure of the Northern Part of the Ninetyeast Ridge (Indian Ocean) through the Integrated Analysis of Geophysical Data
by Vsevolod Yutsis, Oleg Levchenko, Alexander Ivanenko, Ilya Veklich, Nataliya Turko and Yulia Marinova
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(5), 924; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11050924 - 26 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1721
Abstract
The linear Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) is the longest oceanic intraplate volcanic edifice and main feature in the Eastern Indian Ocean. Many seamounts are located on the ridge, whose origin and age remain unclear due to the lack of samples of the bedrock of [...] Read more.
The linear Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) is the longest oceanic intraplate volcanic edifice and main feature in the Eastern Indian Ocean. Many seamounts are located on the ridge, whose origin and age remain unclear due to the lack of samples of the bedrock of which they are composed. Carbonate sedimentary caps on these seamounts prevent their direct geological sampling by dredging, therefore indirect geophysical methods are an alternative. Such integrated geophysical studies (the main methods are multibeam bathymetry and magnetic surveys) were carried out in cruise #42 of the R/V Akademik Boris Petrov in 2017 on a large seamount at the base of the NER’s western slope near 0.5° S. The collected data also includes seismic reflection data that reveal morphology, fault tectonics, depth structure, and an assumed origin of this volcanic feature. The Ninetyeast Ridge was formed by the Kerguelen plume magmatism at 50° S in the giant N-S fault. The seamount studied in cruise #42 of the R/V Akademik Boris Petrov was formed mainly to the north as a result of two-stage magmatism in a transverse strike-slip fault. The first stage (47 Ma) formed the main western part of the seamount at 20° S. The second stage (23 Ma) formed its eastern part at 8° S. The time intervals between the formation of the main massif of the Ninetyeast Ridge and the stages of subsequent magmatism that formed the western and eastern parts of the seamount are approximately 31 and 55 Ma, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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19 pages, 15171 KiB  
Article
Punctiform Breakup and Initial Oceanization in the Central Red Sea Rift
by Ya-Di Sang, Bakhit M. T. Adam, Chun-Feng Li, Liang Huang, Yong-Lin Wen, Jia-Ling Zhang and Yu-Tao Liu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040808 - 10 Apr 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1930
Abstract
The Central Red Sea Rift is a natural laboratory to study the transition from rifting to spreading. Based on new reflection seismic profiles and gravity modeling, we examined the crustal structure, tectonic evolution, breakup mechanism, and future evolution of the Central Red Sea [...] Read more.
The Central Red Sea Rift is a natural laboratory to study the transition from rifting to spreading. Based on new reflection seismic profiles and gravity modeling, we examined the crustal structure, tectonic evolution, breakup mechanism, and future evolution of the Central Red Sea Rift. Along this rift axis, the breakup of continental lithosphere is discontinuous and the oceanic crust is limited to the axial deeps. The punctiform breakup and formation of deeps is assisted by mantle upwelling and topographic uplift, but the nucleation is directly controlled by the normal-fault system. The discontinuities spaced between axial deeps within the relatively continuous central troughs are presently axial domes or highs and will evolve into new deeps with tectonic subsidence. Isolated deeps will grow and connect with each other to become a continuous central trough, before transitioning into a unified spreading center. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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18 pages, 8258 KiB  
Article
Depositional Environment and Organic Matter Enrichment in the Lower Paleozoic Shale from the Northeastern Margin of the Yangtze Platform, South China
by Peng Liu, Changjie Liu and Ruiliang Guo
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(3), 501; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030501 - 25 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1250
Abstract
In this study, twenty-six core shale samples were collected from the marine Lower Paleozoic shale in a well in the northeastern margin of the Yangtze Platform. Analyses of TOC content, mineral composition, major elements, along with trace and rare earth elements were conducted [...] Read more.
In this study, twenty-six core shale samples were collected from the marine Lower Paleozoic shale in a well in the northeastern margin of the Yangtze Platform. Analyses of TOC content, mineral composition, major elements, along with trace and rare earth elements were conducted on the samples. The results were used to investigate the depositional conditions and their effects on organic matter accumulation and preservation. Generally, the sedimentation period of Niutitang Formation shale was in a cold and arid climate with anoxic marine environments, while the shale from Wufeng-Longmaxi Formation was formed in a warm and humid climate with oxic marine environments. In addition, the Wufeng-Longmaxi and Niutitang formations are characterized by low paleo-productivity. The organic matter enrichment for shale in this study could be simultaneously controlled by paleo-redox state and paleo-productivity. Organic matter enrichment of the Niutitang shale is mainly driven by preservation rather than productivity, while the dominant driving factor is the opposite for the Wufeng-Longmaxi shale. Additionally, palaeoclimate and terrestrial influx intensity were found to significantly impact the organic matter enrichment in the Wufeng-Longmaxi shale. The findings have implications for the understanding of the sedimentary processes, organic matter enrichment and preservation and shale gas potential of the study area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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Review

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18 pages, 1616 KiB  
Review
Plastics and Five Heavy Metals from Sea Beaches: A Geographical Synthesis of the Literary Information
by Anna V. Mikhailenko and Dmitry A. Ruban
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(3), 626; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11030626 - 16 Mar 2023
Viewed by 2077
Abstract
Pollution of the oceans and seas, as well as their coastal zones, with plastics has become serious challenge, which is also related to the Anthropocene marine geology and geochemistry. Notably, plastics can bear heavy metals. The related knowledge is scattered through scientific publications, [...] Read more.
Pollution of the oceans and seas, as well as their coastal zones, with plastics has become serious challenge, which is also related to the Anthropocene marine geology and geochemistry. Notably, plastics can bear heavy metals. The related knowledge is scattered through scientific publications, and, thus, it needs generalization. The present study synthesizes the published information about the geographical distribution of cadmium, chromium, mercury, nickel, and zinc associated with plastics on sea beaches. A bibliographical survey is undertaken, and the collected literary information is organized so as to document the principal localities of beached plastics bearing these metals. About twenty localities are established in many parts of the world, and the majority of them correspond to the coasts of the Atlantic and Indian oceans and their seas. Significant attention has been paid by the previous researchers to Northwest Europe and South and East Asia. The available information is enough to postulate the global extent of the problem of heavy metals association with plastics on beaches. Real or potential risks to the environment were reported in many cases. This review also shows that the industry of tourism, hospitality, and recreation contributes to the accumulation of such plastics. The analyzed literary information demonstrates several biases: for instance, Hg-bearing plastics on beaches were reported from the smaller number of localities relatively to the other metals, and the beaches and coastal recreational areas of many regions are yet to be studied in regard to heavy metals associated with plastics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Geological Oceanography II)
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