Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Functional Anatomy and Musculoskeletal System".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 14399

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity covers not just sports but also simple everyday movements, such as housework, walking, and playing. Regular exercise has a great importance in maintaining good health: “Mens sana in corpore sano”. Indeed, inactivity is a risk factor for different chronic diseases. Physical exercise can play a crucial role in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders, optimizing both physical and mental health, decreasing fatigue, and improving sleep. An exercise program for patients with musculoskeletal disorders aims to preserve or restore a range of motion of the affected joints, enhancing bone turnover, increase functional joint stability, increase muscle strength and endurance, improve balance, reduce pain, and decrease health risks associated with a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, physical activity is a good way to socialize and improve mood, and it is an excellent antistress agent. The benefits of exercise on physical limitations and fatigue in musculoskeletal disorders seem to have both short- and long-term effectiveness. This Special Issue will focus on the “Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders”. Original papers and review articles are all welcome.

Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Musumeci
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • musculoskeletal disorders
  • physical activity
  • exercises
  • sport medicine
  • rehabilitation
  • osteoarthritis fatigue, pain, and balance
  • muscle strength and endurance
  • joint stability
  • rheumatic diseases

Published Papers (11 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

11 pages, 798 KiB  
Article
Somatotype Analysis of International Football Players with Cerebral Palsy: A Comparison with Non-Disabled Football Players
by Carmen Doménech, Enrique Roche, Raul Reina and José Manuel Sarabia
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(4), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8040166 - 11 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1837
Abstract
Football for people with cerebral palsy is a para-sport involving ambulant athletes with impairments, such as hypertonia, ataxia, or athetosis. The objective of the present study was to describe the somatotype of a representative sample of international football players according to different functional [...] Read more.
Football for people with cerebral palsy is a para-sport involving ambulant athletes with impairments, such as hypertonia, ataxia, or athetosis. The objective of the present study was to describe the somatotype of a representative sample of international football players according to different functional profiles of cerebral palsy, including spastic diparesis, athetosis/ataxia, spastic hemiparesis, and minimum impairment criteria, and to compare it with non-disabled football players. A total of 144 international para-footballers and 39 non-disabled footballers participated in the study, and their somatotype was calculated using anthropometric measurements. A Kruskal–Wallis test was used to compare the groups to determine and assess the differences between the different functional profiles, and the analysis of anthropometric variables and body composition showed no differences. Regarding somatotype, a predominance of the mesomorphic component was observed in all subgroups, and differences in somatotype were also found between non-disabled footballers and para-footballers with spastic hemiparesis and minimum impairment criteria. This study suggests that there may be a degree of homogeneity in terms of somatotype among footballers with or without physical impairments, such as hypertonia, athetosis, or ataxia. Furthermore, it provides reference values of international-level para-football players for the different sport classes, which can help coaches and trainers monitor athletes’ physical conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1509 KiB  
Article
Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Visceral Adipose Tissue Thickness among Lean and Non-Lean People with and without Spinal Cord Injury
by Amy L. Kimball, Michael A. Petrie, Patrick M. McCue, Kristin A. Johnson and Richard K. Shields
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 123; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030123 - 21 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1015
Abstract
After spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple adaptations occur that influence metabolic health and life quality. Prolonged sitting and inactivity predispose people with SCI to body composition changes, such as increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) thickness, which is often associated with impaired glucose tolerance. [...] Read more.
After spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple adaptations occur that influence metabolic health and life quality. Prolonged sitting and inactivity predispose people with SCI to body composition changes, such as increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) thickness, which is often associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Our goal is to understand whether VAT is an index of leanness, and, secondarily, whether mobility methods influence glucose tolerance for people living with SCI. A total of 15 people with SCI and 20 people without SCI had fasting oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and VAT thickness (leanness) measured during a single session. Glucose was 51% and 67% greater for individuals with SCI relative to those without SCI after 60 and 120 min of an OGTT (p < 0.001). Glucose area under the curve (AUC) was 28%, 34%, and 60% higher for non-lean people with SCI than lean people with SCI and non-lean and lean people without SCI, respectively (p = 0.05, p = 0.009, p < 0.001). VAT was associated with glucose AUC (R2 = 0.23, p = 0.004). Taken together, these findings suggest that leanness, as estimated from VAT, may be an important consideration when developing rehabilitation programs to influence metabolism among people with SCI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 834 KiB  
Article
Tibiotarsal Arthrodesis with Retrograde Intramedullary Nail and RIA Graft: A Salvage Technique
by Giancarlo Salvo, Salvatore Bonfiglio, Marco Ganci, Salvo Milazzo, Rocco Ortuso, Giacomo Papotto and Gianfranco Longo
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030122 - 21 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1110
Abstract
Ankle arthrodesis is a commonly used salvage procedure in the management of post-traumatic ankle fractures, which often result in severe disability and may require the amputation of the distal third of the leg. Successful ankle arthrodesis relies on a thorough assessment of local [...] Read more.
Ankle arthrodesis is a commonly used salvage procedure in the management of post-traumatic ankle fractures, which often result in severe disability and may require the amputation of the distal third of the leg. Successful ankle arthrodesis relies on a thorough assessment of local and systemic risk factors to ensure optimal results. Failure to accurately assess these factors may lead to unsatisfactory results. High-energy trauma causing bone defects and soft tissue necrosis often results in osteomyelitis, a condition that poses a significant threat to the success of the arthrodesis procedure. It is important to apply a standardised surgical protocol to minimise the possibility of superficial and deep infection and limit damage to the neighbouring soft tissues. Therefore, it is critical to undertake surgical lavage and debridement and administer systemic and local antibiotic therapy, along with the use of a spacer, to eradicate infection prior to performing arthrodesis. In this study, we present our experience in the recovery of limbs with post-traumatic complications via tibio-astragalic or tibio-calcaneal arthrodesis using a retrograde intramedullary nail technique. The approach involves a multi-step procedure using a previous antibiotic spacer implant and an autologous bone graft (RIA). This study spanned a period from January 2014 to December 2021 and included 35 patients (12 women and 23 men) with a mean age of 47.8 ± 20.08 years (range: 22–85 years). Among the patients, 18 had osteomyelitis following AO 43 C3 fractures, and 9 of them had previous exposure and bone loss at the time of injury. The remaining cases included 10 patients with AO 44 C fracture outcomes and 7 patients with AO 44 B fracture outcomes. Our results emphasise the importance of the meticulous management of local and systemic risk factors in ankle arthrodesis procedures. The successful eradication of infection and subsequent arthrodesis can be achieved via the implementation of surgical lavage, debridement, and systemic and local antibiotic therapy using spacers. This surgical protocol implemented by us has yielded excellent results, saving affected limbs from post-traumatic complications and avoiding the need for amputation. Our study contributes to the existing knowledge supporting the use of retrograde arthrodesis with intramedullary nails in severe cases where limb salvage is the primary goal. However, further research and long-term follow-up studies are needed to validate these results and evaluate the effectiveness of this technique in a larger patient population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2648 KiB  
Article
Fatiguing Joint Angle Does Not Influence Torque and Neuromuscular Responses Following Sustained, Isometric Forearm Flexion Tasks Anchored to Perceptual Intensity in Men
by Dolores G. Ortega, Terry J. Housh, Robert W. Smith, Jocelyn E. Arnett, Tyler J. Neltner, John Paul V. Anders, Richard J. Schmidt and Glen O. Johnson
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030114 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 814
Abstract
This study examined the effects of joint angle (JA) on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and neuromuscular responses following fatiguing tasks anchored to RPE. Nine men (mean ± SD: age = 20.7 ± 1.2 yrs) performed forearm flexion MVICs at elbow JAs of [...] Read more.
This study examined the effects of joint angle (JA) on maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) and neuromuscular responses following fatiguing tasks anchored to RPE. Nine men (mean ± SD: age = 20.7 ± 1.2 yrs) performed forearm flexion MVICs at elbow JAs of 75° and 125° before and after sustained, isometric forearm flexion tasks to failure at fatiguing joint angles (FJA) of 75° and 125° anchored to RPE = 8. The amplitude and frequency of the electromyographic and mechanomyographic signals were recorded. Neuromuscular efficiency was calculated by dividing normalized torque by normalized electromyographic amplitude. A dependent t-test was used to assess the mean difference for time to task failure (TTF) between FJA. Repeated measure ANOVAs were used to assess mean differences for pre-test to post-test MVIC and neuromuscular responses. There was no significant difference between FJA for TTF (p = 0.223). The MVIC (collapsed across FJA and MVIC JA) decreased from pre-test to post-test (51.1 ± 5.0 vs. 45.3 ± 5.6 Nm, p < 0.001). Normalized neuromuscular parameters remained unchanged (p > 0.05). The FJA resulted in similar torque and neuromuscular responses, and the decreases in MVIC were not tracked by changes in the neuromuscular parameters. Thus, the neuromuscular parameters were not sensitive to fatigue, and pre-test to post-test measures may be compared between different FJA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 2743 KiB  
Article
Effect of the Law Enforcement Duty Belt on Muscle Activation during Hip Hinging Movements in Young, Healthy Adults
by James W. Kearney, Megan N. Sax van der Weyden, Nelson Cortes, Orlando Fernandes and Joel R. Martin
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030099 - 17 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1054
Abstract
Sixty percent of all law enforcement officers (LEOs) experience low back pain (LBP), with the LEO duty belt (LEODB) commonly reported to be a contributing factor. The primary purpose of the study was to investigate the LEODB’s effect on muscular activity [...] Read more.
Sixty percent of all law enforcement officers (LEOs) experience low back pain (LBP), with the LEO duty belt (LEODB) commonly reported to be a contributing factor. The primary purpose of the study was to investigate the LEODB’s effect on muscular activity and compare it to a tactical vest, which is a commonly used alternative to an LEODB. In total, 24 participants (13 male, 11 female; mass, 73.0 ± 11.1 kg; height, 169.0 ± 10.0 cm; age, 24.0 ± 5.8 years) completed a progressive series of hip hinge tasks in a single testing session. All participants completed four conditions (no belt, leather belt, nylon belt, and weight VEST) in a randomized order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors were placed bilaterally on the rectus abdominus, multifidus, biceps femoris, and rectus femoris. Across all tasks, no significant effects of load on muscle activity were found for any of the muscles. Participants rated the VEST condition as more comfortable (p < 0.05) and less restrictive (p < 0.05) than either LEODB. The findings suggest an LEODB does not alter muscle activity during bodyweight hip hinging or lifting objects from the ground. Future research should examine whether changes in muscle activity occur with durations of LEODB wear more similar to an actual work shift duration for LEOs (≥8 h). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 3641 KiB  
Article
The Onset of Musculoskeletal Pain in the COVID-19 Era: A Survey of Physiotherapy Students in Sicily
by Rosario Ferlito, Pierpaolo Panebianco, Valentina Rizzo, Ignazio Prestianni, Marco Sapienza, Martina Ilardo, Maria Musumeci, Vito Pavone and Gianluca Testa
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030091 - 28 Jun 2023
Viewed by 851
Abstract
Online teaching has resulted in university students adopting a sedentary lifestyle. Prolonged sitting and reduced physical activity due to pandemic restrictions have led to musculoskeletal pain in various body areas, significantly impacting students’ quality of life. This study aims to investigate the effects [...] Read more.
Online teaching has resulted in university students adopting a sedentary lifestyle. Prolonged sitting and reduced physical activity due to pandemic restrictions have led to musculoskeletal pain in various body areas, significantly impacting students’ quality of life. This study aims to investigate the effects of remote learning on Sicilian physiotherapy students during the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically focusing on the occurrence of musculoskeletal pain. An observational study was conducted using an online survey administered through Google Forms. The survey consisted of 26 multiple-choice questions and was distributed to students enrolled in physiotherapy programs at the universities of Catania, Messina, and Palermo. Participants were contacted via social channels or email, and data collection spanned 5 weeks. The collected data were analyzed using R software. A total of 128 questionnaires were collected. At the time of compilation, most respondents (n = 103/201, 51.2%) were enrolled in the third year of the course of study in physiotherapy at the universities of Catania, Messina, and Palermo. Their ages ranged between 22 and 25 years (43.3%), and most were female (n = 104/201, 51.7%). More than half of the students (51.6%) reported dedicating 15–22 h per week to distance learning for a duration of 6–12 months (50%). Regarding study location, most students preferred studying at a desk (82.8%), and slightly over half (57.8%) adopted a backrest while studying remotely. Analysis of the students’ posture during study hours revealed common positions, including tilting the head forward by more than 20 degrees (47.8%), leaning the trunk forward by more than 20 degrees (71.9%), hunching both shoulders forward (57.0%), wrists positioned above the level of the elbows (46.1%), thighs pointing upwards (41.4%), and one or both feet in a downward or dorsiflexed position (69.5%). In conclusion the questionnaire responses indicate that the lifestyle of university students, influenced by online teaching, has deteriorated, leading to musculoskeletal pain, including myofascial pain. These results are primarily influenced by the adopted posture and the duration of time spent in these positions. Additionally, research is needed to identify the most effective therapeutic approaches for managing musculoskeletal pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 744 KiB  
Article
Low Correlation between Gait and Quality of Life in Advanced Knee Osteoarthritis
by Valentín Freijo, Claudia Navarro, Begoña Molina and Jordi Villalba
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(2), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8020077 - 08 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1007
Abstract
Advanced knee osteoarthritis patients’ gait usually undergoes alterations leading to decreased mobility and lower functional performance, which can result in a worsening of their quality of life (QoL). While several authors have reported a moderate correlation between gait parameters and QoL assessed by [...] Read more.
Advanced knee osteoarthritis patients’ gait usually undergoes alterations leading to decreased mobility and lower functional performance, which can result in a worsening of their quality of life (QoL). While several authors have reported a moderate correlation between gait parameters and QoL assessed by generic questionnaires, the literature is scarce. This study aimed to explore the relationship between gait and QoL parameters assessed by a generic and a disease-specific questionnaire in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis. In this single-centre, prospective, observational study, 129 patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis scheduled for elective total knee replacement were selected. The patients’ gait was evaluated by means of a validated wireless device while they walked 30 m at a comfortable speed. Patient function was also analysed using the Knee Society Score (KSS). QoL was measured with the EQ-5D and the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) questionnaires. Patients showed a mean walking speed of 0.95 ± 0.19 m/s, a mean cadence of 105.6 ± 9.9 steps/min, and a mean stride length of 1.25 ± 0.17 m on both legs. They presented poor knee status (KSS < 60) and poor QoL, with an EQ-5D of 0.44 ± 0.24 and a total KOOS of 29.77 ± 13.99. Positive low correlations (r <0.5, p <0.5) were found only between the speed, propulsion and stride length of both legs, and the overall and ADLs subscale scores of the total KOOS questionnaire. In conclusion, several gait parameters have a significant low correlation with the QoL of patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis, as assessed by an osteoarthritis-specific questionnaire. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1004 KiB  
Article
Muscle Strength and Hamstrings to Quadriceps Ratio in Young Soccer Players: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Athanasios Mandroukas, Yiannis Michailidis and Thomas Metaxas
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8020070 - 23 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1926
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine and compare the concentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee flexors and extensors muscles, as well as their ratio, in young soccer players. Two hundred and sixty-five (n = 265) young soccer players were [...] Read more.
The aim of the present study was to examine and compare the concentric isokinetic peak torque of the knee flexors and extensors muscles, as well as their ratio, in young soccer players. Two hundred and sixty-five (n = 265) young soccer players were divided into five groups: U-12 (n = 43, mean age 11.5 ± 0.4 yrs), U-14 (n = 63, mean age 13.6 ± 0.3 yrs), U-16 (n = 64, mean age 15.4 ± 0.5 yrs), U-18 (n = 53, mean age 17.5 ± 0.4 yrs) and U-20 (n = 42, mean age 19.3 ± 0.6 yrs). Three maximal voluntary isokinetic leg extensions and flexions at angular velocities of 60, 180, and 300°·s−1, and H:Q strength ratio was determined. The largest H:Q strength ratio for all ages, with the exception of age group U-12, appears at a slow angular velocity of 60°·s−1, and the smallest H:Q ratio at a fast angular velocity of 300°·s−1. In age group U-12, at an angular velocity of 60°·s−1, the strength of the quadriceps muscle was almost twice the strength of the hamstrings. The H:Q strength ratio was smaller in age group U-12 and greater in group U-20. In age group U-12, the greatest H:Q strength ratio appeared at an angular velocity of 180°·s−1, while in the other age groups, it appeared at 60°·s−1. Strength training of hamstring muscles remains inadequate across ages. The small H:Q strength ratio in younger ages and the large H:Q ratio in older ages suggest that high-intensity training may increase the H:Q strength ratio, which, in turn, may protect the knee joint from excessive and burdensome loads. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

11 pages, 458 KiB  
Review
The Anterolateral Ligament of the Knee in Pediatric Patients: What Do We Know? A Scoping Review
by Ludovico Lucenti, Gianluca Testa, Marco Montemagno, Marco Sapienza, Arcangelo Russo, Fabrizio Di Maria, Claudia de Cristo and Vito Pavone
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030126 - 04 Sep 2023
Viewed by 787
Abstract
The knowledge on the anatomy, function and biomechanics and the role of surgical procedures on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee is still controversial. Only a few papers have examined the ALL in children. The aim of this review is to analyze [...] Read more.
The knowledge on the anatomy, function and biomechanics and the role of surgical procedures on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee is still controversial. Only a few papers have examined the ALL in children. The aim of this review is to analyze all the available literature about ALL in the pediatric population. Following the PRISMA criteria, the literature was systematically reviewed, examining all the articles about ALL in pediatric patients. Eight articles were involved in this study. Five cadaveric studies, two diagnostic studies, and one cross-sectional study were found. The identification of the ALL is not always possible in diagnostic studies using magnetic resonance (MRI) or in dissecting specimens. A high variability in the presence of the ligament and in its origin and insertion were found among the studies. It is more difficult to identify the ligament in younger patients than in older children, suggesting that its presence may develop at some point during the growth. Further studies are needed for a detailed knowledge of the ALL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 616 KiB  
Review
Effectiveness of Focal Muscle Vibration in the Recovery of Neuromotor Hypofunction: A Systematic Review
by Luigi Fattorini, Angelo Rodio, Guido Maria Filippi and Vito Enrico Pettorossi
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030103 - 25 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1705
Abstract
Adequate physical recovery after trauma, injury, disease, a long period of hypomobility, or simply ageing is a difficult goal because rehabilitation protocols are long-lasting and often cannot ensure complete motor recovery. Therefore, the optimisation of rehabilitation procedures is an important target to be [...] Read more.
Adequate physical recovery after trauma, injury, disease, a long period of hypomobility, or simply ageing is a difficult goal because rehabilitation protocols are long-lasting and often cannot ensure complete motor recovery. Therefore, the optimisation of rehabilitation procedures is an important target to be achieved. The possibility of restoring motor functions by acting on proprioceptive signals by unspecific repetitive muscle vibration, focally applied on single muscles (RFV), instead of only training muscle function, is a new perspective, as suggested by the effects on the motor performance evidenced by healthy persons. The focal muscle vibration consists of micro-stretching-shortening sequences applied to individual muscles. By repeating such stimulation, an immediate and persistent increase in motility can be attained. This review aims to show whether this proprioceptive stimulation is useful for optimising the rehabilitative process in the presence of poor motor function. Papers reporting RFV effects have evidenced that the motor deficits can be counteracted by focal vibration leading to an early and quick complete recovery. The RFV efficacy has been observed in various clinical conditions. The motor improvements were immediate and obtained without loading the joints. The review suggests that these protocols can be considered a powerful new advantage to enhance traditional rehabilitation and achieve a more complete motor recovery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 5866 KiB  
Review
A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Exercise Beneficial for Locomotion in Community-Dwelling Elderly People with Sarcopenia
by Seunghyeok Song, Gushik Kim and Hyunjoong Kim
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2023, 8(3), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk8030092 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1702
Abstract
Sarcopenia, in addition to aging and reduced physical activity, is a progressive skeletal muscle disorder that causes the loss of muscle mass and strength. The most prominent functional change is mobility, which contributes to a decrease in the quality of life. Therefore, we [...] Read more.
Sarcopenia, in addition to aging and reduced physical activity, is a progressive skeletal muscle disorder that causes the loss of muscle mass and strength. The most prominent functional change is mobility, which contributes to a decrease in the quality of life. Therefore, we aimed to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses by synthesizing randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated exercises that affected locomotion in patients with sarcopenia. The RCTs were retrieved in April 2023 from three international electronic databases (Embase, MEDLINE, and PubMed). RCTs published after 2013 were compared with a control group that did not include exercise. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed on the identified studies using RevMan 5.4 and risk of bias assessment provided by Cochrane. RCTs involving 594 patients with sarcopenia were included in this study. The analysis model was synthesized as a random effects model, and the standard mean difference (SMD) was used as the effect measure. Exercise interventions were found to not change muscle mass in individuals with sarcopenia (SMD = 0.04; 95% CI: −0.15 to 0.22). However, they had positive effects on lower extremity muscle strength (SMD = 0.34; 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.66) and walking speed (SMD = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.11 to 0.72). For community-dwelling elderly people with sarcopenia, exercise intervention did not lead to an increase in reduced muscle mass, but it brought positive improvements in lower extremity strength and gait speed to improve locomotion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Exercises in Musculoskeletal Disorders—6th Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop