Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Neck Pain

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 February 2023) | Viewed by 2911

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan
Interests: neck pain; cervical spine disorders; diagnosis; management; spine surgery; total disc replacement (TDR); novel rehabilitation strategy
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neck pain is one of common symptoms between general population. Its annual prevalence has been reported as 12.1~71.5 % in general population and it has been reported that 11~14.1 % of laborer annually experience restriction of activity by neck pain. Thus, neck pain can be one of significant social and economical burden. In spine surgery field, postoperative neck pain is one of the well known factors having negative impact on patient satisfaction after surgery. Therefore, advance in diagnosis and management of neck pain can have significant impact on medical and social aspects.

This Special Issue invites researchers in the field to contribute to the state of the art in the diagnosis and management of neck pain.

Dr. Masao Koda
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • neck pain
  • cervical spine disorders
  • diagnosis
  • management
  • spine surgery
  • total disc replacement (TDR)
  • novel rehabilitation strategy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 2324 KiB  
Article
A Novel Device for Assessment and Treatment of Upper Cervical Spine: Test–Retest Reliability Study
by Andoni Carrasco-Uribarren, Xavier Marimon, Alejandro Portela, Sara Cabanillas-Barea, Pere Ramón Rodríguez-Rubio and Román A. Pérez
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(5), 1954; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12051954 - 01 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
Introduction: Neck pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in primary care. Clinicians evaluate different variables, including movement and cervical strength, to determine the prognosis of patients. Usually, the tools employed for this purpose are expensive and bulky, or more [...] Read more.
Introduction: Neck pain is one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in primary care. Clinicians evaluate different variables, including movement and cervical strength, to determine the prognosis of patients. Usually, the tools employed for this purpose are expensive and bulky, or more than one is needed. This study aims to describe a novel device designed to assess the cervical spine and describe its test–retest reliability. Methods: The Spinetrack device was designed to measure the strength of deep cervical flexor muscles and the chin-in and chin-out movement of the upper cervical spine. A test–retest reliability study was developed. The flexion, extension and strength needed to move the Spinetrack device were registered. Two measurements were developed, with one week between each assessment. Results: Twenty healthy subjects were evaluated. The strength of the deep cervical flexor muscles in the first measurement was 21.18 ± 3.15 Newtons, the displacement movement during chin-in movement was 12.79 mm ± 3.46 and the displacement during chin-out movement was 35.99 mm ± 4.44. The test–retest reliability of strength was ICC 0.97 (95% CI (0.91–0.99)). Conclusion: The Spinetrack device has shown excellent test–retest reliability values for the measurement of the strength of the cervical flexor muscles and for the chin-in and chin-out movements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Neck Pain)
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16 pages, 2016 KiB  
Article
Controversial Outcomes in Neck Rehabilitation between Surgically and Conservatively Treated Patients—Results of an Observational Study
by Martin Missmann, Vincent Grote, David Riedl, Jean-Pascal Grenier and Michael J. Fischer
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(3), 1004; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12031004 - 28 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1051
Abstract
The present study aimed to compare changes during inpatient rehabilitation between conservatively and surgically treated patients. A total of n = 162 patients with cervical spine complaints were included in the study (n = 107 conservatively treated, n = 55 after surgery). [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to compare changes during inpatient rehabilitation between conservatively and surgically treated patients. A total of n = 162 patients with cervical spine complaints were included in the study (n = 107 conservatively treated, n = 55 after surgery). Patients completed disease-specific (NDI) and generic (NPRS, EQ-5D-5L, HAQ) patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) before and after rehabilitation. In addition, the range of motion (ROM) in the transversal plane of the cervical spine was measured. Changes and correlations between PROMs and ROM values during rehabilitation were assessed. The influence of moderating factors on NDI outcomes was examined. Significant improvements with large effect sizes were found in PROMs and ROM (all p < 0.001). The conservatively treated patients showed significantly greater NDI improvements than operated patients (p = 0.050), but a greater proportion of poor performance in ROM (p = 0.035). Baseline NDI (β = 0.66), HAQ (β = 0.14), and ROM scores (β = −0.17) explained 63.7% of the variance in NDI after rehabilitation. Both patient groups showed different outcomes. The findings of this study indicate that the unique needs of patients may require different therapeutic interventions and highlight the importance of using multidimensional outcome measures when implementing a multimodal rehabilitation approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management of Neck Pain)
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