European Independent Foundation in Angiology/Vascular Medicine (VAS) Collection on Vascular Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Vascular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 11924

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medicine, University of Galway, Galway, Ireland
Interests: angiology; vascular medicine; diabetes; internal medicine; frailty
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Guest Editor
Department of Angiology, Szent Imre University Teaching Hospital, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: cardiovascular epidemiology; large vessel arteritis; microcirculation; renovascular disease

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Guest Editor
Department for Vascular Diseases, Medical Faculty of Ljubljana, University Medical Center Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Interests: angiology; vascular medicine; peripheral vascular disease

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is a collection of selected papers from the European Independent Foundation in Angiology/Vascular Medicine (VAS) (https://www.vas-int.net/). VAS is the affiliated society of the Journal of Clinical Medicine (JCM).

The aim of the VAS collection is to stimulate updated knowledge and further International collaboration, offering reviews on selected aspects of Angiology/Vascular Medicine. This 2023 edition will focus on the impacts of ageing, vascular literacy, gender difference, and co-morbidities, including diabetes and cancer, on peripheral vascular disease. We also accept original papers on the current perspectives on relevant and emerging topics in Angiology/Vascular Medicine, including epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic intervention.

Dr. Aaron Liew
Dr. Endre Kolossvary
Prof. Dr. Matija Kozak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • angiology
  • vascular medicine
  • thrombosis/coagulation
  • vascular physiology
  • platelet
  • leukocyte
  • endothelium
  • inflammation
  • peripheral artery disease
  • venous thromboembolism
  • acute pulmonary embolism
  • aneurysm
  • microcirculation
  • chronic venous disease
  • lymphedema
  • ageing
  • awareness

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 258 KiB  
Article
A RAND/UCLA-Modified VAS Study on Telemedicine, Telehealth, and Virtual Care in Daily Clinical Practice of Vascular Medicine
by Sergio Pillon, Georgia Gomatou, Evangelos Dimakakos, Agata Stanek, Zsolt Pecsvarady, Matija Kozak, Jean-Claude Wautrecht, Katalin Farkas, Gerit-Holger Schernthaner, Mariella Catalano, Aleš Blinc, Grigorios Gerotziafas, Pavel Poredoš, Sergio De Marchi, Michael E. Gschwandtner, Endre Kolossváry, Muriel Sprynger, Bahar Fazeli, Aaron Liew, Peter Marschang, Andrzej Szuba, Dusan Suput, Michael Edmonds, Chris Manu, Christian Alexander Schaefer, George Marakomichelakis, Majda Vrkić Kirhmajer, Jonas Spaak, Elias Kotteas, Gianfranco Lessiani, Mary Paola Colgan, Marc Righini, Michael Lichtenberg, Oliver Schlager, Caitriona Canning, Antonella Marcoccia, Anastasios Kollias and Alberta Spreaficoadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(6), 1750; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13061750 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 901
Abstract
Background: Telemedicine is increasingly used in several fields of healthcare, including vascular medicine. This study aimed to investigate the views of experts and propose clinical practice recommendations on the possible applications of telemedicine in vascular medicine. Methods: A clinical guidance group proposed a [...] Read more.
Background: Telemedicine is increasingly used in several fields of healthcare, including vascular medicine. This study aimed to investigate the views of experts and propose clinical practice recommendations on the possible applications of telemedicine in vascular medicine. Methods: A clinical guidance group proposed a set of 67 clinical practice recommendations based on the synthesis of current evidence and expert opinion. The Telemedicine Vascular Medicine Working Group included 32 experts from Europe evaluating the appropriateness of each clinical practice recommendation based on published RAND/UCLA methodology in two rounds. Results: In the first round, 60.9% of clinical practice recommendations were rated as appropriate, 35.9% as uncertain, and 3.1% as inappropriate. The strongest agreement (a median value of 10) was reached on statements regarding the usefulness of telemedicine during the 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, its usefulness for geographical areas that are difficult to access, and the superiority of video calls compared to phone calls only. The lowest degree of agreement (a median value of 2) was reported on statements regarding the utility of telemedicine being limited to the COVID-19 pandemic and regarding the applicability of teleconsultation in the diagnosis and management of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the second round, 11 statements were re-evaluated to reduce variability. Conclusions: This study highlights the levels of agreement and the points that raise concern on the use of telemedicine in vascular medicine. It emphasizes the need for further clarification on various issues, including infrastructure, logistics, and legislation. Full article
18 pages, 2208 KiB  
Article
Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease Using an Automated Four-Limb Blood Pressure Monitor Equipped with Toe–Brachial Index Measurement
by Krisztina Fendrik, Katalin Biró, Dóra Endrei, Katalin Koltai, Barbara Sándor, Kálmán Tóth and Gábor Késmárky
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6539; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206539 - 15 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1302
Abstract
Toe–brachial index (TBI) measurement helps to detect peripheral artery disease (PAD) in patients with incompressible ankle arteries due to medial arterial calcification, which is most frequently associated with diabetes. We aimed to evaluate how an automated four-limb blood pressure monitor equipped with TBI [...] Read more.
Toe–brachial index (TBI) measurement helps to detect peripheral artery disease (PAD) in patients with incompressible ankle arteries due to medial arterial calcification, which is most frequently associated with diabetes. We aimed to evaluate how an automated four-limb blood pressure monitor equipped with TBI measurement could contribute to PAD screening. In 117 patients (mean age 63.2 ± 12.8 years), ankle–brachial index (ABI) measurement was performed using the Doppler-method and the MESI mTablet. TBI was obtained via photoplethysmography (MESI mTablet, SysToe) and a laser Doppler fluxmeter (PeriFlux 5000). Lower limb PAD lesions were evaluated based on vascular imaging. A significant correlation was found between Doppler and MESI ankle–brachial index values (r = 0.672), which was stronger in non-diabetic (r = 0.744) than in diabetic (r = 0.562) patients. At an ABI cut-off of 0.9, Doppler (AUC = 0.888) showed a sensitivity/specificity of 67.1%/97.4%, MESI (AUC 0.891) exhibited a sensitivity/specificity of 57.0%/100%; at a cut-off of 1.0, MESI demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 74.7%/94.8%. The TBI values measured using the three devices did not differ significantly (p = 0.33). At a TBI cut-off of 0.7, MESI (AUC = 0.909) revealed a sensitivity/specificity of 92.1%/67.5%. Combining MESI ABI and TBI measurements recognised 92.4% of PAD limbs. Using an ABI cut-off level of 1.0 and sequential TBI measurement increases the sensitivity of the device in detecting PAD. The precise interpretation of the obtained results requires some expertise. Full article
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12 pages, 1310 KiB  
Article
Increasing Soluble P-Selectin Levels Predict Higher Peripheral Atherosclerotic Plaque Progression
by Philip Sommer, Michael Schreinlechner, Maria Noflatscher, Daniela Lener, Fabian Mair, Markus Theurl, Rudolf Kirchmair and Peter Marschang
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(20), 6430; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12206430 - 10 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1314
Abstract
Background and aims: The adhesion molecule P-selectin is expressed by endothelial cells and platelets. It is involved in platelet activation and leukocyte adhesion, both important processes in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Our study was designed to assess the predictive value of soluble P-selectin [...] Read more.
Background and aims: The adhesion molecule P-selectin is expressed by endothelial cells and platelets. It is involved in platelet activation and leukocyte adhesion, both important processes in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Our study was designed to assess the predictive value of soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) on the progression of peripheral atherosclerosis. Methods: This is an observational, single-center, cohort study that included 443 patients with established cardiovascular disease (CVD) or at least one cardiovascular risk factor. Over a period of 4 years, each patient underwent three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound to assess the plaque volume of the carotid and femoral arteries once per year. In addition, plasma sP-selectin levels were measured at each visit. The association between changes in sP-selectin and peripheral atherosclerotic plaque progression was assessed using growth curve models. Results: 338 patients were available for statistical analysis. Each standard deviation increase in sP-selectin was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with a 46.09 mm3 higher plaque volume. In ROC-analysis, changes in sP-selectin over time showed an optimal cut-off value around Δ 0.0 µg/mL sP-selectin and significantly improved the predictive value of the ESC-SCORE (AUC for the combination of both parameters was 0.75 (95% CI 0.68–0.81, p < 0.001). Patients with increasing sP-selectin showed a significantly higher plaque progression compared to patients with decreasing or stable sP-selectin levels (202 mm3 vs. 110 mm3, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Increasing sP-selectin levels can predict higher atherosclerotic plaque progression as measured by 3D ultrasound. We suggest serial measurements of sP-selectin as an easily measurable biomarker for peripheral atherosclerotic plaque progression. Full article
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13 pages, 507 KiB  
Article
Prognostic Factors for Restenosis of Superficial Femoral Artery after Endovascular Treatment
by Vinko Boc, Matija Kozak, Barbara Eržen, Mojca Božič Mijovski, Anja Boc and Aleš Blinc
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(19), 6343; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12196343 - 3 Oct 2023
Viewed by 784
Abstract
High incidence of superficial femoral artery (SFA) restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) poses a persistent challenge in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) treatment. We studied how the patients‘ and lesions’ characteristics, thrombin generation, overall haemostatic potential (OHP), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of [...] Read more.
High incidence of superficial femoral artery (SFA) restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) poses a persistent challenge in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) treatment. We studied how the patients‘ and lesions’ characteristics, thrombin generation, overall haemostatic potential (OHP), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NR4A2 and PECAM1 genes affected the likelihood of restenosis. In total, 206 consecutive PAD patients with limiting intermittent claudication due to SFA stenosis who were treated with balloon angioplasty with bailout stenting when necessary were included. Patients’ clinical status and patency of the treated arterial segment on ultrasound examination were assessed 1, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Restenosis occurred in 45% of patients, with less than 20% of all patients experiencing symptoms. In the multivariate analysis, predictors of restenosis proved to be poor infrapopliteal runoff, higher lesion complexity, absence of treated arterial hypertension, delayed lag phase in thrombin generation, and higher contribution of plasma extracellular vesicles to thrombin concentration. Poor infrapopliteal runoff increased the risk of restenosis in the first 6 months, but not later. The negative effect of poor infrapopliteal runoff on SFA patency opens questions about the potential benefits of simultaneous revascularisation of below-knee arteries along with SFA revascularisation. Full article
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Review

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31 pages, 3141 KiB  
Review
Vascular Diseases in Women: Do Women Suffer from Them Differently?
by Katalin Farkas, Agata Stanek, Stephanie Zbinden, Barbara Borea, Simina Ciurica, Vanessa Moore, Peggy Maguire, Maria Teresa B. Abola, Elaine B. Alajar, Antonella Marcoccia, Dilek Erer, Ana I. Casanegra, Hiva Sharebiani, Muriel Sprynger, Maryam Kavousi and Mariella Catalano
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(4), 1108; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13041108 - 15 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1078
Abstract
According to the World Health Organization, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among women worldwide, yet its magnitude is often underestimated. Biological and gender differences affect health, diagnosis, and healthcare in numerous ways. The lack of sex and gender awareness [...] Read more.
According to the World Health Organization, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among women worldwide, yet its magnitude is often underestimated. Biological and gender differences affect health, diagnosis, and healthcare in numerous ways. The lack of sex and gender awareness in health research and healthcare is an ongoing issue that affects not only research but also treatment and outcomes. The importance of recognizing the impacts of both sex and gender on health and of knowing the differences between the two in healthcare is beginning to gain ground. There is more appreciation of the roles that biological differences (sex) and sociocultural power structures (gender) have, and both sex and gender affect health behavior, the development of diseases, their diagnosis, management, and the long-term effects of an illness. An important issue is the knowledge and awareness of women about vascular diseases. The risk of cardiovascular events is drastically underestimated by women themselves, as well as by those around them. The purpose of this review is to draw attention to improving the medical care and treatment of women with vascular diseases. Full article
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30 pages, 3486 KiB  
Review
No More Venous Ulcers—What More Can We Do?
by Agata Stanek, Giovanni Mosti, Temirov Surat Nematillaevich, Eva Maria Valesky, Tanja Planinšek Ručigaj, Malika Boucelma, George Marakomichelakis, Aaron Liew, Bahar Fazeli, Mariella Catalano and Malay Patel
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(19), 6153; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12196153 - 23 Sep 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3065
Abstract
Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are the most severe complication caused by the progression of chronic venous insufficiency. They account for approximately 70–90% of all chronic leg ulcers (CLUs). A total of 1% of the Western population will suffer at some time in their [...] Read more.
Venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are the most severe complication caused by the progression of chronic venous insufficiency. They account for approximately 70–90% of all chronic leg ulcers (CLUs). A total of 1% of the Western population will suffer at some time in their lives from a VLU. Furthermore, most CLUs are VLUs, defined as chronic leg wounds that show no tendency to heal after three months of appropriate treatment or are still not fully healed at 12 months. The essential feature of VLUs is their recurrence. VLUs also significantly impact quality of life and could cause social isolation and depression. They also have a significant avoidable economic burden. It is estimated that the treatment of venous ulceration accounts for around 3% of the total expenditure on healthcare. A VLU-free world is a highly desirable aim but could be challenging to achieve with the current knowledge of the pathophysiology and diagnostic and therapeutical protocols. To decrease the incidence of VLUs, the long-term goal must be to identify high-risk patients at an early stage of chronic venous disease and initiate appropriate preventive measures. This review discusses the epidemiology, socioeconomic burden, pathophysiology, diagnosis, modes of conservative and invasive treatment, and prevention of VLUs. Full article
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14 pages, 1425 KiB  
Review
Aging and Vascular Disease: A Multidisciplinary Overview
by Jeanette A. Maier, Vicente Andrés, Sara Castiglioni, Alessandro Giudici, Emily S. Lau, János Nemcsik, Francesca Seta, Paola Zaninotto, Mariella Catalano and Naomi M. Hamburg
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(17), 5512; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12175512 - 25 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2189
Abstract
Vascular aging, i.e., the deterioration of the structure and function of the arteries over the life course, predicts cardiovascular events and mortality. Vascular degeneration can be recognized before becoming clinically symptomatic; therefore, its assessment allows the early identification of individuals at risk. This [...] Read more.
Vascular aging, i.e., the deterioration of the structure and function of the arteries over the life course, predicts cardiovascular events and mortality. Vascular degeneration can be recognized before becoming clinically symptomatic; therefore, its assessment allows the early identification of individuals at risk. This opens the possibility of minimizing disease progression. To review these issues, a search was completed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google Scholar from 2000 to date. As a network of clinicians and scientists involved in vascular medicine, we here describe the structural and functional age-dependent alterations of the arteries, the clinical tools for an early diagnosis of vascular aging, and the cellular and molecular events implicated. It emerges that more studies are necessary to identify the best strategy to quantify vascular aging, and to design proper physical activity programs, nutritional and pharmacological strategies, as well as social interventions to prevent, delay, and eventually revert the disease. Full article
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