Clinical Aspects of Return to Sport after Injuries

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 2448

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Clinical Rehabilitation, University of Physical Education in Kraków, 31-571 Kraków, Poland
Interests: rehabilitation medicine; sports medicine; exercise science; biomechanics; bioengineering
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Guest Editor
1. Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Medical College Krakow, Jagiellonian University, Krakow, Poland
2. Oleksy Medical & Sports Sciences, Łańcut, Poland
Interests: rehabilitation medicine; sports medicine; exercise science; return to sport; injury risk; biomechanics; bioengineering
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optimal athletic training should lead to a high level of performance, but, usually, a high volume of repetition and a lack of variety in movement patterns can result in muscle imbalance, altering tissue stress, which leads to injury. Returning to sport after injury is often a difficult and time-consuming process. However, it is crucial to understand the underlying mechanisms of sports injury, which allow for successive treatment, rehabilitation or sport training individualization. There is a need to define the key performance indicators in the return-to-sport monitoring process and to develop guidelines for effective therapeutic intervention after injuries. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide a comprehensive overview of the advances in the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries, with a particular emphasis on all clinical and functional aspects that influence the safe and effective return to sport after an injury. Therefore, this Special Issue aims to highlight the explanations for alterations in the musculoskeletal system, particularly emphasizing mechanisms of tissue overload and injury from the biomechanical, rehabilitation and sport perspectives. Research papers as well as review papers are encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Anna Mika
Dr. Łukasz Oleksy
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • musculoskeletal system
  • tissue overload
  • diagnostic methods
  • rehabilitation
  • treatment
  • injury prevention
  • return to sport
  • rehabilitation medicine
  • sports medicine

Published Papers (3 papers)

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9 pages, 697 KiB  
Article
Bucket-Handle Meniscal Tears Might Not Be an Urgency: The Time to Meniscus Repair Does Not Seem to Affect the Mid-Term Outcome—A Retrospective Study of Sixty Tears with a Mean Follow-Up of 6 Years
by Philipp Schippers, Victoria Buschmann, Felix Wunderlich, Yama Afghanyar, Sebastian Fischer, Erik Wegner, Philipp Drees, Erol Gercek and Lukas Eckhard
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(11), 3048; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13113048 - 22 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Bucket-handle meniscal tears are mostly treated arthroscopically. However, there is no clear evidence as to whether the time to surgery impacts the outcome and whether or not lesions should be treated urgently. Methods: Sixty patients were interviewed about the current [...] Read more.
Background: Bucket-handle meniscal tears are mostly treated arthroscopically. However, there is no clear evidence as to whether the time to surgery impacts the outcome and whether or not lesions should be treated urgently. Methods: Sixty patients were interviewed about the current status of their knee with a mean follow-up of 6.1 years (SD = 3.5). Forty-one patients underwent meniscus repair, and fifteen patients received partial resections. The primary outcome was the rate of reoperation after meniscus repair. Secondary outcomes were pain at rest and during exercise, return to sports, and Tegner and Lysholm scores. Results: The average time to surgery was 14.4 days, with no significant impact of surgical timing on the rate of reoperation. Furthermore, no significant differences were found in pain levels, return to sports, or Tegner and Lysholm scores based on the timing of surgery. Conclusions: In our cohort, the time to surgery was not a prognostic factor for the reoperation rate or postoperative outcome in repairing bucket-handle meniscal tears. Therefore, arthroscopic repair should not be performed in an emergency setting but conducted after careful planning by experienced arthroscopy surgeons. Regarding the return to sports, postoperative factors such as rehabilitation protocols or surgical techniques could be more important than the time to surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Aspects of Return to Sport after Injuries)
15 pages, 1063 KiB  
Article
Immediate Effect of Cryo-Compression Therapy on Biomechanical Properties and Perfusion of Forearm Muscles in Mixed Martial Arts Fighters
by Robert Trybulski, Adrian Kużdżał, Marta Bichowska-Pawęska, Andriy Vovkanych, Adam Kawczyński, Grzegorz Biolik and Jarosław Muracki
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(4), 1177; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13041177 - 19 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1129
Abstract
Mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters use their arms and hands for striking with the fists, grappling, and defensive techniques, which puts a high load on the forearms and hand muscles. New methods are needed to decrease the risk of injury and increase the [...] Read more.
Mixed martial arts (MMA) fighters use their arms and hands for striking with the fists, grappling, and defensive techniques, which puts a high load on the forearms and hand muscles. New methods are needed to decrease the risk of injury and increase the effectiveness of regeneration. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of cryo-compression (CC) therapy of different times (3 and 6 min) on forearm muscles in MMA fighters by investigating muscle pain, stiffness, tension, elasticity strength, and perfusion. Twenty professional male MMA fighters aged 26.5 ± 4.5 years, with training experience of 10.3 ± 5.0 years, were enrolled on an experimental within-group study design. The participants underwent CC therapy at a temperature of 3 °C and compression of 75 mmHg for 3 min and, in the second session, for 6 min. The investigated parameters were in the following order: (1) perfusion in non-reference units (PU), (2) muscle tone (T—[Hz]), (3) stiffness (S—[N/m]), (4) elasticity (E—[arb]), (5) pressure pain threshold (PPT—[N/cm]), and (6) maximum isometric force (Fmax [kgf]) at two time points: (1) at rest—2 min before CC therapy (pre) and (2) 2 min after CC therapy (post). There were significant differences between 3 and 6 min of CC therapy for PU and T. Meanwhile, F, E, PPT, and S were significantly different when comparing pre- to post-conditions. These results provide evidence that CC therapy is a stimulus that significantly affects parameters characterizing muscle biomechanical properties, pain threshold, strength, and tissue perfusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Aspects of Return to Sport after Injuries)
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11 pages, 251 KiB  
Protocol
Physical Therapies for Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness: A Protocol for an Umbrella and Mapping Systematic Review with Meta-Meta-Analysis
by Szczepan Wiecha, Paweł Posadzki, Robert Prill and Maciej Płaszewski
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 2006; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13072006 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), also known as exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), is typically caused by strenuous and/or unaccustomed physical exercise. DOMS/EIMD manifests itself in reduced muscle strength and performance levels, increased muscle soreness, swelling, and elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Numerous [...] Read more.
Background: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), also known as exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), is typically caused by strenuous and/or unaccustomed physical exercise. DOMS/EIMD manifests itself in reduced muscle strength and performance levels, increased muscle soreness, swelling, and elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers. Numerous randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews (SRs) of a wide variety of physiotherapy interventions for reducing the signs and symptoms of DOMS/EIMD have been published. However, these SRs often arrive at contradictory conclusions, impeding decision-making processes. Objective: We will systematically review the current evidence on clinical outcomes (efficacy, safety) of physiotherapy interventions for the treatment of DOMS/EIMD in healthy adults. We will also assess the quality of the evidence and identify, map, and summarise data from the available SRs. Method: Umbrella review with evidence map and meta-meta-analyses. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Epistemonikos and PEDro will be searched from January 1998 until February 2024. SRs of RCTs of any treatment used by physiotherapists (e.g., low-level laser therapy, electrical stimulation, heat/cold therapy, ultrasound, magnets, massage, manual therapies) to treat DOMS/EIMD in healthy adults will be eligible. Narrative/non-systematic reviews, studies of adolescents/children and medically compromised individuals, of complementary therapies, dietary, nutritional, or pharmacological interventions, as well as self-administered interventions, or those published before 1998, will be excluded. AMSTAR 2 will be used to evaluate the methodological quality of the included SRs. Corrected covered area, will be computed for assessing overlaps among included SRs, and an evidence map will be prepared to describe the credibility of evidence for interventions analysed in the relevant SRs. Discussion: DOMS/EIMD is a complex condition, and there is no consensus regarding the standard of clinical/physiotherapeutic care. By critically evaluating the existing evidence, we aim to inform clinicians about the most promising therapies for DOMS/EIMD. This umbrella review has the potential to identify gaps in the existing evidence base that would inform future research. The protocol has been registered at PROSPERO (CRD42024485501]. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Aspects of Return to Sport after Injuries)
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