Clinical Application of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS)

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 698

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sebastian Ille
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Klinikum Rechts Der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich, Germany
Interests: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS); brain tumors; brain imaging; neuroimaging; brain stimulation; brain mapping; cognitive neuroscience; neuroplasticity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has evolved from a research tool to a highly standardized technique that can be used in daily clinical routines. Through its non-invasiveness and when combined with neuronavigation (nTMS), the technique per se offers multiple options regarding the diagnostics, therapy, or rehabilitation of patients suffering from various pathologies. Apart from my own focus on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative clinical application of nTMS in neurosurgery, several types of medical professionals, such as neurologists, psychiatrists, pediatricians, pain therapists, or rehabilitation physicians, also clinically apply TMS.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to give a comprehensive overview summarizing the latest research on the clinical application of TMS for 1) cortical brain mapping and monitoring of functionality, 2) its use as a basis for anatomical tractography or connectome analysis, 3) therapy of neurological and psychiatric diseases, pain and further pathologies, 4) support and therapy during neurorehabilitation, 5) the impact on the patients’ clinical, functional, or oncological outcome, 6) as well as the visualization of functional reorganization or therapy effects. This Special Issue welcomes both original research articles and reviews.

Dr. Sebastian Ille
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • transcranial magnetic stimulation
  • neuronavigation
  • brain mapping
  • TMS diagnostics
  • TMS therapy
  • neurorehabilitation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1766 KiB  
Article
Systematic Evaluation of the Effects of Voluntary Activation on Lower Extremity Motor Thresholds
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(18), 5993; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12185993 - 15 Sep 2023
Viewed by 547
Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the relationship between the resting motor threshold (rMT) and active motor threshold (aMT). A cross-sectional comparison of MTs measured at four states of lower extremity muscle activation was conducted: resting, 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), [...] Read more.
The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the relationship between the resting motor threshold (rMT) and active motor threshold (aMT). A cross-sectional comparison of MTs measured at four states of lower extremity muscle activation was conducted: resting, 5% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), 10%MVC, and standing. MTs were measured at the tibialis anterior in the ipsilesional and contralesional limbs in participants in the chronic phase (>6 months) of stroke (n = 11) and in the dominant limb of healthy controls (n = 11). To compare across activation levels, the responses were standardized using averaged peak-to-peak background electromyography (EMG) activity measured at 10%MVC + 2SD for each participant, in addition to the traditional 0.05 mV criterion for rMT (rMT50). In all participants, as muscle activation increased, the least square mean estimates of MTs decreased (contralesional: p = 0.008; ipsilesional: p = 0.0015, healthy dominant: p < 0.0001). In healthy controls, rMT50 was significantly different from all other MTs (p < 0.0344), while in stroke, there were no differences in either limb (p > 0.10). This investigation highlights the relationship between rMT and aMTs, which is important as many stroke survivors do not present with an rMT, necessitating the use of an aMT. Future works may consider the use of the standardized criterion that accounted for background EMG activity across activation levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Application of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS))
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