From Endocrine Tumors Requiring Surgery to Endocrine Issues of Different Surgical Conditions

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2024) | Viewed by 2577

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Endocrinology, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 050474 Bucharest, Romania
2. Department of Endocrinology, C.I. Parhon National Institute of Endocrinology, 011863 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: thyroid; adrenal; pituitary; osteoporosis; neuroendocrine tumors; bone; fracture; gynecological endocrinology
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Guest Editor
1. Department 4—Cardio-Thoracic Pathology, Thoracic Surgery II Discipline, Faculty of Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
2. Thoracic Surgery Department, “Dr. Carol Davila” Central Emergency University Military Hospital, 013058 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: thyroid surgery; parathyroid surgery; lung neuroendocrine tumors; lung cancer; minimally invasive surgery; VATS; cervico-mediastinal surgery; thoracic-abdominal surgery; pleuro-pericardial disease; chest wall tumors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The domain of endocrine tumors is heterogeneous, requiring a multidisciplinary panel of investigations and approaches. The majority of cases diagnosed with endocrine tumors are referred to a surgical team in order to achieve the cure of the condition. That is why pre-operatory findings are essential to locate the tumor and to provide genetic testing and hormonal work-up for a better outcome. Our objective is to capture the essence of these aspects.

Thus, we invite you to contribute to one or several papers (original study or review) for this Special Issue. We are particularly interested, but not exclusively, in: adrenal tumors with functioning or non-functioning profiles and associated co-morbidities; unusual complications of traditional pituitary tumors; complex aspects of parathyroid and thyroid neoplasia; as well as a bridge from an endocrine-surgical perspective to neuroendocrine tumors. Moreover, unexpected endocrine issues such as adrenal hemorrhage, acute adrenal insufficiency or clotting-related hypopituitarism amid different (non-endocrine) surgical procedures are of interest for this Special Issue, in addition to unusual endocrine locations (tumor-like lesions) at the level of endocrine glands such amyloid, lymphoma, and metastasis.

Dr. Mara Carsote
Dr. Claudiu Nistor
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • endocrine tumor
  • hormone
  • surgery
  • pituitary adenoma
  • thyroid cancer
  • adrenal tumor
  • parathyroid tumor
  • incidentaloma
  • amyloid
  • lymphoma
  • metastases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 4358 KiB  
Article
Tumour-Induced Osteomalacia—A Long Way to the Diagnosis Facilitated by [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT
by Jolanta Kunikowska, Natalia Andryszak, Elżbieta Skowrońska-Jóźwiak, Kacper Pełka, Arkadiusz Zygmunt, Andrzej Lewiński, Marek Ruchała and Rafał Czepczyński
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(6), 1817; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13061817 - 21 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome. Detecting the primary tumour in TIO is challenging using conventional imaging methods. This study assesses the efficacy of [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in identifying the primary tumour. Methods: Six patients with suspected TIO underwent [...] Read more.
Background: Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome. Detecting the primary tumour in TIO is challenging using conventional imaging methods. This study assesses the efficacy of [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in identifying the primary tumour. Methods: Six patients with suspected TIO underwent [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. The patients’ clinical history and biochemical parameters were analysed. Results: [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT successfully identified primary tumours in four patients (femoral bones for two, iliac bone for one, subcutaneous tissue of pubic region for one). Tumour removal led to clinical and laboratory improvement. In one patient, PET/CT showed rib uptake, but the biopsy was negative. One patient showed no tumour lesions on PET/CT despite clinical evidence. Two patients had focal recurrence at the primary tumour site, detected by follow-up PET/CT. Conclusions: [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is a valuable tool for detecting primary tumours in TIO, aiding in accurate diagnosis and guiding surgery, leading to improved outcomes. Further research is needed to validate these findings and explore [68Ga]Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in other paraneoplastic syndromes. Full article
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12 pages, 1654 KiB  
Article
Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer: Are Neuroendocrine Tumors or Adenocarcinomas the Culprit? Analysis of the Largest U.S. Cancer Incidence Database, 2001–2020
by Yazan Abboud, Madison Fraser, Imran Qureshi and Kaveh Hajifathalian
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(4), 1098; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13041098 - 15 Feb 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: While prior data showed an increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in young adults, the contribution of adenocarcinoma (ADC) and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to this trend is not well studied. Therefore, we conducted a comparative analysis of the incidence rates and [...] Read more.
(1) Background: While prior data showed an increasing incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in young adults, the contribution of adenocarcinoma (ADC) and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to this trend is not well studied. Therefore, we conducted a comparative analysis of the incidence rates and time trends of colorectal ADC and NETs in young adults (aged 24–54) using the United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) database. (2) Methods: Age-adjusted CRC incidence rates between 2001 and 2020 were calculated and categorized by sex, histopathology, and stage at diagnosis. Annual percentage change (APC) and average APC (AAPC) were computed via joinpoint regression utilizing weighted Bayesian information criteria to generate the simplest trend. Pairwise comparative analysis of ADC and NETs was conducted using tests of identicalness and parallelism. (3) Results: In this study, 514,875 patients were diagnosed with early-onset-CRC between 2001 and 2020 (54.8% men). While CRC incidence was significantly increased, including both ADC (448,670 patients) and NETs (36,205 patients), a significantly greater increase was seen for NETs (AAPC = 2.65) compared to ADC (AAPC = 0.91), with AAPC difference = 1.73 (p = 0.01) and non-identical non-parallel trends (p-values < 0.001). This was most notable in males (AAPC difference = 1.81, p = 0.03) and for early-stage tumors (AAPC difference = 3.56, p < 0.001). (4) Conclusions: Our study, covering ~98% of the U.S. population provides the first comparative analysis of early-onset CRC histopathological subtypes, showing that the rate of increase of NETs in young adults is much greater than that of ADC. Given that patients with NETs with malignant behavior can experience significant mortality, our findings are importance, highlighting the rapidly increasing NET incidence in young adults and encouraging early screening that can improve outcomes. Full article
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Review

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12 pages, 2619 KiB  
Review
Adrenal Cysts: To Operate or Not to Operate?
by Ivana Bozic Antic, Igor Djurisic and Srdjan Nikolic
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 846; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030846 - 01 Feb 2024
Viewed by 952
Abstract
Adrenal cysts are uncommon and usually asymptomatic, and therefore are usually incidentally discovered adrenal lesions. They have a broad pathohistological spectrum that includes pseudocysts and endothelial (vascular), parasitic, and epithelial (mesothelial) cysts. Although most adrenal cysts are benign and hormonally non-functional lesions, some [...] Read more.
Adrenal cysts are uncommon and usually asymptomatic, and therefore are usually incidentally discovered adrenal lesions. They have a broad pathohistological spectrum that includes pseudocysts and endothelial (vascular), parasitic, and epithelial (mesothelial) cysts. Although most adrenal cysts are benign and hormonally non-functional lesions, some can have ambiguous imaging appearances and mimic malignant adrenal neoplasms. On the other hand, the actual malignant neoplasms could undergo cystic transformation. Additionally, immune cell infiltrations, thrombosis, or haemorrhage seen in sepsis can frequently cause adrenal cyst development, raising a question about the possible connection between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and adrenal cystic lesions. Due to the disease’s rarity, the likelihood of malignancy, and the lack of specific guidelines, the management of adrenal cysts is always challenging especially in a young person. This review discusses the important diagnostic and the current treatment possibilities for adrenal cystic lesions. Aiming to emphasize clinical dilemmas and help clinicians navigate the challenges when encountering a patient with an adrenal cyst in everyday practice, we based our review on a practical question–answer framework centred around the case of a young woman with an incidentally discovered large adrenal cyst. Full article
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