Innovations in Vascular Medicine: Optimizing Patient Care through Peripheral Interventions

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Vascular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2024 | Viewed by 1446

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Interventional Cardiology, Institute of Cardiology, The John Paul II Hospital, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 80 Prądnicka St, 31-202 Krakow, Poland
Interests: cardiovascular disease; inflammatory cytokines and microRNAs in atherosclerosis and aortic valve stenosis; athero-sclerosis prevention and treatment; interventions on carotid and renal arteries; renovascular disease; monitoring of ath-erosclerosis progression; carotid intima-media; arterial stiffness; vascular age
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to outlining the recent advancements in clinical vascular medicine. It focuses on improving the treatment and prognosis of vascular diseases and enhancing quality of life for patients through the use of innovative peripheral interventions, such as minimally invasive procedures and surgeries.

The optimization of the management of and interventions in an individual patient should be tailored to specific clinical scenarios that may be challenging. Whether in patients of advanced age or in young adults, the risk and benefit of intervention, together with post-intervention well-being and outcomes, should be strongly considered.

Therefore, the launching of this Special Issue is a call for submissions focused on current updates and perspectives on non-coronary interventions in all age categories, including very young patients, child-bearing females, very elderly patients, etc.

Observational, review, research, or meta-analysis papers examining patterns of care, outcomes, and comparative effectiveness of percutaneous or surgical interventions are invited. The future of clinical vascular medicine holds promising prospects. Continued research efforts are expected to refine the existing procedures, improve patient outcomes, and minimize risks. Additionally, advancements in interventional devices are being explored to optimize treatment options.

We welcome researchers, clinicians, and experts in this field to contribute their original research articles and reviews. The goal of this Special Issue is to promote knowledge exchange, collaboration, and advance the field towards optimal patient care.

This Special Issue aims to bring together recent research and review articles, particularly focused on the following topics:

  • Carotid artery interventions in stable and vulnerable plaque;
  • Challenges in the management of chronic and acute limb ischemia in patients with and without diabetes;
  • Minimally invasive interventions in very elderly patients;
  • Clinical and invasive approaches to manage vascular complications in pregnancy;
  • Optimization of care and risk stratification to individualize patient treatment;
  • Non-coronary interventions in various subsets of patients;
  • Interventions on atherosclerotic lesions and non-atherosclerotic arterial disease, including arterial embolization and inflammatory or congenital vascular disease;
  • Arterial complications in heart diseases.

Prof. Dr. Anna Kabłak-Ziembicka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vascular medicine
  • peripheral interventions
  • interventional devices
  • clinical research
  • elderly patients
  • specific patients' populations
  • child-bearing
  • pregnancy
  • young patients
  • diabetes
  • limb ischemia
  • carotid interventions
  • atherosclerotic lesions
  • non-atherosclerotic vascular disease

Published Papers (2 papers)

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10 pages, 647 KiB  
Article
Relationship between Pulse Pressure and Handgrip Strength in the Korean Population: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study
by Ryuk Jun Kwon, Young Hye Cho, Eun-Ju Park, Youngin Lee, Sang Yeoup Lee, Jung-In Choi, Sae Rom Lee and Soo Min Son
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051515 - 6 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of muscle mass and strength and low physical performance, and it is closely related to the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Pulse pressure (PP) is a biomarker of arterial stiffness and compliance. Elevated PP levels [...] Read more.
Background: Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of muscle mass and strength and low physical performance, and it is closely related to the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Pulse pressure (PP) is a biomarker of arterial stiffness and compliance. Elevated PP levels increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality. Nevertheless, the association between PP and sarcopenia has not yet been clearly established. Methods: Participant data were extracted from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted from 2014 to 2020. The study population was classified into three groups (PP < 40 mmHg, 40 mmHg ≤ PP < 60 mmHg, and PP ≥ 60 mmHg). PP was calculated by deducting the diastolic blood pressure from the systolic blood pressure. For handgrip strength, the maximum value measured with a grip dynamometer was adopted (weak handgrip strength: <28 kg for men, <18 kg for woman; normal handgrip strength: ≥28 kg for men, ≥18 kg for women). To determine the relationship between PP and the prevalence of weak handgrip strength, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed after adjusting for possible confounding factors. Results: The higher PP group had a higher age, body mass index; systolic blood pressure, prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome, and maximum handgrip strength. In all models, the prevalence of weak handgrip strength was significantly higher in the group with PP ≥ 60 mmHg compared to the control group (PP < 40 mmHg). Conclusions: Elevated PP was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of weak muscle strength. Thus, PP monitoring may be used to identify individuals at risk of sarcopenia and is helpful in improving health outcomes. Full article
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18 pages, 2735 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Utility of Three-Dimensional Printing in Physician-Modified Stent Grafts for Aortic Lesions Repair
by Wiktoria Antonina Zasada, Hubert Stępak, Magdalena Węglewska, Łukasz Świątek, Jerzy Kluba and Zbigniew Krasiński
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(10), 2977; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13102977 - 18 May 2024
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Abstract
Background: Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming increasingly popular around the world not only in engineering but also in the medical industry. This trend is visible, especially in aortic modeling for both training and treatment purposes. As a result of advancements in 3D [...] Read more.
Background: Three-dimensional (3D) printing is becoming increasingly popular around the world not only in engineering but also in the medical industry. This trend is visible, especially in aortic modeling for both training and treatment purposes. As a result of advancements in 3D technology, patients can be offered personalized treatment of aortic lesions via physician-modified stent grafts (PMSG), which can be tailored to the specific vascular conditions of the patient. The objective of this systematic review was to investigate the utility of 3D printing in PMSG in aortic lesion repair by examining procedure time and complications. Methods: The systematic review has been performed using the PRISMA 2020 Checklist and PRISMA 2020 flow diagram and following the Cochrane Handbook. The systematic review has been registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews: CRD42024526950. Results: Five studies with a total number of 172 patients were included in the final review. The mean operation time was 249.95± 70.03 min, and the mean modification time was 65.38 ± 10.59 min. The analysis of the results indicated I2 of 99% and 100% indicating high heterogeneity among studies. The bias assessment indicated the moderate quality of the included research. Conclusions: The noticeable variance in the reviewed studies’ results marks the need for larger randomized trials as clinical results of 3D printing in PMSG have great potential for patients with aortic lesions in both elective and urgent procedures. Full article
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