Hematologic Malignancies: Treatment Strategies and Future Challenges

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Hematology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 26 April 2024 | Viewed by 1051

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Hematology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, 2-1-1 Tomioka, Urayasu-shi, Chiba, Japan
Interests: hematolygy; lymphoma; hematological malignancies; multiple myeloma

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would appreciate it if you would contribute to the upcoming special issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine, "Hematologic Malignancies: Treatment Strategies and Future Challenges". Hematologic malignancies are among the most prevalent cancers, and their incidence has increased in recent decades. Despite clinical progress, challenges such as relapse, refractory cases, and drug resistance still remain. The main purpose of this research theme is to introduce current therapeutic strategies and, as future challenges, to explore the future of hematologic malignancies, such as discovery of new targets or biomarkers and epigenetic drugs. It also includes the development of novel drugs in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents to reduce side effects and resistance in hematologic malignancies. Authors are encouraged to submit original research papers, reviews. We encourage submissions that provide new insights into underlying proliferation and resistance mechanisms in the treatment of hematological malignancies and discuss the clinical implications of these findings. After submission, all manuscripts are peer-reviewed according to standard journal procedures and policies. We hope that you will accept this invitation and contribute to the success of this special issue. We look forward to working with you.

Dr. Masaaki Noguchi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hematologic malignancies
  • relapse
  • refractory
  • drug resistance
  • therapeutic strategies
  • new target
  • biomarkers
  • new insights

Published Papers (1 paper)

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16 pages, 682 KiB  
Systematic Review
Evaluating the Impact of Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin on CMV Reactivation Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Systematic Literature Review
by Jarosław Dybko, Ugo Giordano, Justyna Pilch, Jakub Mizera, Artur Borkowski and Izabela Dereń-Wagemann
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(24), 7765; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12247765 - 18 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 876
Abstract
Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) are two frequently utilised strategies in graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), currently approved for different recipient-donor settings. In addition, being efficacious in preventing GvHD owing to their T-cell depleting capacity, the [...] Read more.
Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) and post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) are two frequently utilised strategies in graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), currently approved for different recipient-donor settings. In addition, being efficacious in preventing GvHD owing to their T-cell depleting capacity, the employment of these two agents increases the risk of infections, including CMV reactivation, which stands as one of the most common and serious infections following allo-HCT. We performed a systematic literature review of articles published until 1 September 2023, through PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus, with the main endpoint being CMV reactivation after PTCy or ATG allo-HCT. The majority of the studies included in the analysis provide supporting evidence for a reduced risk of CMV reactivations following the use of PTCy compared to ATG, although not all findings reached statistical significance. Additionally, it appears that utilising a haploidentical donor leads to a higher incidence of CMV infections and clinically significant CMV infections (CS-CMVis) compared to other donor settings in PTCy allo-HCT. This study aims to compare the risk of CMV infections following allo-HCT in patients who have received either ATG or PTCy as GvHD prophylaxis and discuss other factors that could influence the infectious outcomes of patients who have undergone allo-HCT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hematologic Malignancies: Treatment Strategies and Future Challenges)
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