Modulation of the Immune System in Inflammatory Diseases and Hidradenitis Suppurativa

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Dermatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 1475

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. International Centre for Hidradenitis Suppurativa/Acne Inversa, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
2. Skin Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
Interests: dermatooncology; hidradenitis suppurativa; inflammation; melanoma; endocrinology; skin cancer; surgery; psoriasis; skin
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Guest Editor Assistant
1. International Centre for Hidradenitis Suppurativa/Acne Inversa, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
2. Skin Cancer Center, Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44791 Bochum, Germany
Interests: hidradenitis suppurativa; inflammation; hormones; Merkel cell carcinoma; melanoma; endocrinology; skin cancer; obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In inflammatory diseases, a disbalance of the immune system plays a decisive role. An increasing number of drugs, biologics, and vaccines are being developed to modulate the immune system. Many immunomodulators suppress proinflammatory cytokines and stabilise inflammatory diseases. 

For this Special Issue, entitled “Modulation of the Immune System in Inflammatory Diseases and Hidradenitis Suppurativa”, review articles, original articles, and larger case series from various specialities of rheumatology, dermatology, neurology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, virology, pharmacology, and oncology are welcome. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the following areas: 

  • Inflammatory diseases and potential immune system modulators;
  • Newly discovered targets for drugs or vaccines in inflammatory diseases;
  • New insights into the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases;
  • Potential adverse effects of immunomodulators or treatment response.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Vaccines.

Prof. Dr. Falk Georges Bechara
Guest Editor

Dr. Nessr Abu Rached
Guest Editor Assistant

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • hidradenitis suppurativa
  • psoriasis
  • acne inversa
  • inflammatory diseases
  • immune system
  • vaccines
  • multiple sclerosis
  • myositis
  • neuritis
  • Lyme disease
  • Crohn's disease
  • ulcerative colitis
  • axial spondyloarthritis
  • rheumatoid arthritis
  • thyroiditis

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 1489 KiB  
Article
Primary Thyroid Dysfunction Is Prevalent in Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Marked by a Signature of Hypothyroid Graves’ Disease: A Case–Control Study
by Nessr Abu Rached, Johannes W. Dietrich, Lennart Ocker, Daniel R. Quast, Christina Scheel, Thilo Gambichler and Falk G. Bechara
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(23), 7490; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12237490 - 04 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1289
Abstract
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic skin disease that can have an association with endocrine disorders. There is conflicting information in the literature regarding the role of the thyroid gland in HS. This study aimed to close this knowledge gap and investigate how [...] Read more.
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic skin disease that can have an association with endocrine disorders. There is conflicting information in the literature regarding the role of the thyroid gland in HS. This study aimed to close this knowledge gap and investigate how thyroid disease is involved in patients with HS. We carried out a case–control study with a total of 160 patients, of whom 108 were patients with HS and 52 were controls matched for age and sex. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to analyze the results. We calculated structural parameters of thyroid homeostasis to detect subclinical thyroid disease, non-thyroid disease syndrome and other forms. The severity of HS was not associated with thyroid hormone levels and antibodies (p > 0.05). HS patients with or without hypothyroidism had decreased FT4 levels and a decreased thyroid secretory capacity (SPINA-GT). Titers of TSH receptor autoantibodies (TRAb) were significantly higher in smoking HS patients compared to non-smokers (median: 1.18 vs. 1.08; p = 0.042). The rate of subclinical hypothyroidism was significantly higher in HS patients; thus, subclinical hypothyroidism is an important comorbidity of HS (p < 0.05). Further studies are needed to investigate whether the chronic inflammation of HS is a cause of increased rates of (subclinical) hypothyroidism. Full article
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