Aortic Aneurysm: Latest Insights into Therapeutic Approaches

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Vascular Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2024 | Viewed by 1332

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Vascular Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Thessaly, 41110 Larissa, Greece
Interests: carotid artery disease; aortic aneurysms; peripheral arterial disease; chronic venous disease; venous thrombosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Thessaly, 41334 Larissa, Greece
Interests: aortic aneurysm; thoracoabdominal aneurysm; aortic dissection; atheromatosis; complex aneurysm; aortic biology; endovascular treatment; peripheral aneurysm
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Thessaly, 41334 Larissa, Greece
Interests: endovascular; aortic aneurysm; thoracoabdominal aneurysm; complex aneurysm carotid stenosis; angioplasty; stenting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aortic aneurismal disease is a potentially life-threatening condition, and its prevalence is expected to grow with the increase in the elderly population due to prolonged life expectancy. Thus, the demand for vascular procedures will inevitably rise worldwide. Over the last two decades, endovascular treatment has evolved to become the treatment of choice due its associated low morbidity and mortality, while the procedure has been subjected to various refine-ments with new devices and techniques. Additionally, pre-, peri- and post-operative technological advancements have also improved and new insights have appeared in various fields (imaging, software process, diagnostic tools, perioperative protective measures, and follow-up procedures).

This Special Issue aims to provide an update of new insights into diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, focusing on the whole area of aortic aneurysm management, including perceptions of new technologies and novel devices. Accordingly, this Special Issue will provide a forum for high-quality original research and review articles with up-to-date evidence and knowledge.

Prof. Dr. Athanasios Giannoukas
Dr. Konstantinos Spanos
Dr. George N. Kouvelos
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • aortic aneurysm
  • endovascular repair
  • imaging
  • diagnosis
  • therapy epidemiology

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 1409 KiB  
Article
Can Biomarkers and PET Imaging Predict Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Growth Rate?
by Samuel Bruls, Lucia Musumeci, Audrey Courtois, Roland Hustinx, Sarah Sakalihasan, Gauthier Namur, Jean-Olivier Defraigne and Natzi Sakalihasan
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(8), 2448; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13082448 - 22 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Background: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening condition due to the risk of aneurysm growth and rupture. Biomarkers linked to AAA pathogenesis are attractive candidates for AAA diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess circulating biomarkers levels relationship [...] Read more.
Background: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening condition due to the risk of aneurysm growth and rupture. Biomarkers linked to AAA pathogenesis are attractive candidates for AAA diagnosis and prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess circulating biomarkers levels relationship with PET imaging positivity and their predictive value in AAA growth rate. Methods: A total of 164 patients with AAA had whole body [18F]FDG PET/CT examination and blood drawn for biomarkers analysis at inclusion. Of these, 121 patients had at least one follow-up imaging assessment for AAA progression. Median (quartiles) imaging follow-up period was 32.8 months (15.2–69.6 months). Results: At baseline, PET was visually positive in 28 (17%) patients. Among PET+ patients, female proportion was higher compared to PET−patients (respectively, n = 6, 21.4% vs. n = 11, 8.1%, p = 0.046). Biomarkers of inflammation (CRP, CCL18), of proteolytic activity (MMP9), of extracellular matrix, and calcification regulation (OPN, OPG) were all significantly increased in PET+ patients (p < 0.05). During follow-up, rapid AAA growth (increase in size ≥ 1 cm per year) was observed in 36 (29.8%) patients and several biomarkers (CRP, MMP9, OPN, and OPG) were increased in those patients compared to patients without rapid growth (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Although PET positivity at baseline was not associated with rapid growth, CRP levels showed a significant association. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aortic Aneurysm: Latest Insights into Therapeutic Approaches)
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11 pages, 38976 KiB  
Case Report
Management of a Rare Case of Multiple Coronary Artery Fistulas Associated with Ascending Aortic and Root Aneurysm: Case Report and Review of Literature
by Mircea Robu, Bogdan Radulescu, Reza Nayyerani, Robert Enache, Ovidiu Stiru, Andrei Iosifescu, Georgiana Olaru, Raluca Ciomag (Ianula), Vlad Anton Iliescu and Horatiu Moldovan
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(8), 2297; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13082297 - 16 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Coronary artery fistulas draining into the left ventricle is a rare finding. They can be associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies like ventricular septal defect or tetralogy of Fallot. While most of them are asymptomatic, they can lead to severe cardiac complications like [...] Read more.
Coronary artery fistulas draining into the left ventricle is a rare finding. They can be associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies like ventricular septal defect or tetralogy of Fallot. While most of them are asymptomatic, they can lead to severe cardiac complications like infective endocarditis, heart failure, or myocardial ischemia. Symptomatic coronary artery fistulas can be managed surgically or percutaneously. We present a case of a 61-year-old male patient with both left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery fistulas draining into the left ventricle associated with ascending aorta and root aneurysm. Preoperative assessment for myocardial ischemia and the size and location of the fistulas was performed. The echocardiography stress test was negative. Surgery consisted of replacement of the ascending aorta and reconstruction of the noncoronary sinus with a Dacron patch with aortic valve preservation and no intervention for the coronary artery fistulas. The surgical strategy was adapted for cardioplegia administration to compensate for the volume of coronary blood drained into the left ventricle and for better protection of the distal myocardium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aortic Aneurysm: Latest Insights into Therapeutic Approaches)
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