Recent Progress in Cardiovascular Epidemiology

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology, Lifestyle, and Cardiovascular Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 4936

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
Interests: cardiovascular disease epidemiology and prevention; cardiometabolic disorders and outcomes study; big data analytics; risk prediction modeling and machine learning; health disparities and global health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Big data analytics have revolutionized the field of cardiovascular disease epidemiology by allowing researchers to analyze vast amounts of data from multiple sources, such as national population-based longitudinal cohort studies, risk- and disease-outcomes-focused surveillance systems, electronic health records, administrative claims data, genetic data, and environmental data. Sex-specific risk prediction models for heart failure (HF), peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and stroke subtypes are particularly welcome in this specific issue. These new models are expected to combine traditional risk factors, novel biomarkers, genetic information, and robust modeling approaches. 

Dr. Longjian Liu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • big data
  • cardiovascular risk and outcomes
  • complex modeling and risk prediction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 403 KiB  
Article
Association between Serum Testosterone and Aortic Valve Stenosis: A Prospective Cohort Study
by Jari A. Laukkanen, Carl J. Lavie and Setor K. Kunutsor
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(11), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10110454 - 9 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Serum testosterone is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which shares risk factors with aortic stenosis (AS). The association between serum testosterone and AS has not been previously investigated. We aimed to assess the prospective association between serum testosterone and risk of AS. Serum [...] Read more.
Serum testosterone is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, which shares risk factors with aortic stenosis (AS). The association between serum testosterone and AS has not been previously investigated. We aimed to assess the prospective association between serum testosterone and risk of AS. Serum testosterone was determined at baseline using a radioimmunoassay kit in 2577 men aged 42–61 years recruited into the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease prospective cohort study. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (Cis) were estimated for AS. After a median follow-up of 27.2 years, 119 cases of AS were recorded. The risk of AS increased continuously with increasing serum testosterone across the range 25–39 nmol/L (p-value for nonlinearity = 0.49). In an analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, history of type 2 diabetes, history of coronary heart disease, and alcohol consumption, the HR (95% CI) for AS was 1.39 (1.10–1.76) per 10 nmol/L increase in serum testosterone. When alcohol consumption was replaced with physical activity, the HR (95% CI) was 1.38 (1.09–1.74). Comparing the bottom versus top third of serum testosterone, the corresponding (adjusted) risk estimates were 1.76 (1.11–2.81) and 1.76 (1.10–2.80), respectively. In middle-aged and older Finnish men, elevated levels of serum testosterone were associated with an increased risk of AS. Further research is needed to replicate these findings and assess any potential relevance of serum testosterone in AS prevention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Cardiovascular Epidemiology)
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Review

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16 pages, 700 KiB  
Review
The Inclusion of Underrepresented Populations in Cardiovascular Genetics and Epidemiology
by Elias Chappell, Laura Arbour and Zachary Laksman
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(2), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11020056 - 5 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Novel genetic risk markers have helped us to advance the field of cardiovascular epidemiology and refine our current understanding and risk stratification paradigms. The discovery and analysis of variants can help us to tailor prognostication and management. However, populations underrepresented in cardiovascular epidemiology [...] Read more.
Novel genetic risk markers have helped us to advance the field of cardiovascular epidemiology and refine our current understanding and risk stratification paradigms. The discovery and analysis of variants can help us to tailor prognostication and management. However, populations underrepresented in cardiovascular epidemiology and cardiogenetics research may experience inequities in care if prediction tools are not applicable to them clinically. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to outline the barriers that underrepresented populations can face in participating in genetics research, to describe the current efforts to diversify cardiogenetics research, and to outline strategies that researchers in cardiovascular epidemiology can implement to include underrepresented populations. Mistrust, a lack of diverse research teams, the improper use of sensitive biodata, and the constraints of genetic analyses are all barriers for including diverse populations in genetics studies. The current work is beginning to address the paucity of ethnically diverse genetics research and has already begun to shed light on the potential benefits of including underrepresented and diverse populations. Reducing barriers for individuals, utilizing community-driven research processes, adopting novel recruitment strategies, and pushing for organizational support for diverse genetics research are key steps that clinicians and researchers can take to develop equitable risk stratification tools and improve patient care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Cardiovascular Epidemiology)
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Other

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12 pages, 247 KiB  
Essay
In Search of Risk Factors: The Origin and Early Stages of Cardiovascular Epidemiology
by Alessandro Menotti and Paolo Emilio Puddu
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(1), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11010020 - 12 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Based mainly on their personal experience, the authors try to describe the origin of cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemiology and the problems and difficulties practitioners attempted to tackle and solve during the first few decades of this discipline, which started around the middle of [...] Read more.
Based mainly on their personal experience, the authors try to describe the origin of cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemiology and the problems and difficulties practitioners attempted to tackle and solve during the first few decades of this discipline, which started around the middle of the last century. Beyond identifying the characteristics of those who became CVD epidemiologists, a description is given of the initial structures of the involved studies, participation rates, risk factors measurements and standardization, clinical measurements and diagnostic criteria, mortality data collection and coding, data loading and analysis, plus a number of problems still unsolved at the beginning of the 2000s. Despite many obstacles, and the initial hostility of the medical–scientific establishment, CVD epidemiology represented a revolution in researching in the bio-medical field. In the end, it also affected clinical research introducing the use of the quantitative approach bound to mathematical–statistical procedures. After decades of hard work and the development of a number of innovative tools, CVD epidemiology received its deserved recognition, eventually being accepted as a reputable and independent scientific discipline. Yet, in several countries, especially those from Southern Europe, an academic recognition of CVD epidemiology is still lacking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Progress in Cardiovascular Epidemiology)
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