Clinical Burden of Comorbidities on Cardiovascular System and Beyond

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Cardiovascular Clinical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5214

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Medical College, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-317 Kielce, Poland
Interests: epidemiology; co-morbidities; acute coronary syndromes; diabetes; inflammation; platelets; PCI; statistics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The scope of this JCDD Special Issue is to promote a multidisciplinary approach to cardiovascular disease and its burden. Atherosclerosis is a generalized inflammatory process that almost never impacts solely on the heart and coronary system. Recent decades, but also the COVID-19 pandemic, have underlined the importance of comorbidities on cardiovascular disease and outcomes. We seek novel and bold analyses of known and hypothetical but currently untested markers, imaging methods and co-morbidities on the heart and vessels.

This Special Issue will provide a platform for the presentation of recent advances in knowledge on the development of cardiovascular disease from diverse scientific disciplines including internal medicine, cardiac surgery, as well as basic sciences and dentistry. The broad focus of the issue will enhance our understanding of the range of cardiovascular disease burden.

Prof. Dr. Zbigniew Siudak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • co-morbidity
  • inflammation
  • valves
  • stents
  • epidemiology
  • coronary
  • diabetes
  • gender
  • age
  • markers

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 620 KiB  
Article
Atrial Fibrillation in Heart Failure with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: Distinct Elevated Risk for Cardiovascular Outcomes in Women Compared to Men
by Alaa Mabrouk Salem Omar, Mohamed Ahmed Abdel Rahman, Osama Rifaie and Jonathan N. Bella
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2022, 9(12), 417; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd9120417 - 26 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1140
Abstract
Background: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is prevalent in women and is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, sex associations in AF-related HFpEF are not well explored. Aim: We studied differences between men and women with and without AF-related HFpEF symptoms [...] Read more.
Background: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is prevalent in women and is associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, sex associations in AF-related HFpEF are not well explored. Aim: We studied differences between men and women with and without AF-related HFpEF symptoms on left ventricular (LV) geometry and diastolic dysfunction (DD) and their effect on cardiovascular events. Methods: Retrospectively, HFpEF patients with and without a history of AF referred for echocardiography were studied. Echocardiographic assessments were focused on LV geometry and diastolic functions. Patients were followed for the occurrence of cardiac events defined as death and cardiac hospitalization. Results: We studied 556 patients [age: 66.7 ± 17 years, 320 (58%) women, 91 (16%) AF]. Compared to HFpEF without AF (HFpEF-AF), HFpEF with AF patients (HFpEF+AF) were older (76 ± 13.8 vs. 64.9 ± 17.3 years, p < 0.001), had more risk factors, comorbidities, left ventricular hypertrophy (32 vs. 13%, p < 0.001), higher relative wall thickness (0.50 ± 0.14 vs. 0.44 ± 0.15, p < 0.001), and DD (56 vs. 30%, all p < 0.001). HFpEF+AF women had the worst clinical, LV geometric, and diastolic functional profiles and highest rates of cardiovascular outcomes compared to HFpEF+AF men and were the only group to predict outcomes (HR: 2.7, 95%CI: 1.4–5.1), while HFpEF-AF women were a low-risk group; HFpEF+AF and HFpEF-AF men had intermediate cardiovascular outcomes which were confirmed after propensity score matching. Conclusions: Among patients with HFpEF, women with AF had more abnormal LV geometry and diastolic function and had an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes independent of traditional risk factors, comorbidities, and baseline diastolic function. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Burden of Comorbidities on Cardiovascular System and Beyond)
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Review

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14 pages, 607 KiB  
Review
Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Cardiovascular Significance; Current Evidence and Novel Insights
by Anastasios Tentolouris, Ioannis Ntanasis-Stathopoulos, Maria Gavriatopoulou, Ioanna Andreadou and Evangelos Terpos
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(12), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10120484 - 4 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1955
Abstract
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant condition characterized by the presence of low levels of a monoclonal protein in the serum and a low percentage of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. MGUS may progress to multiple myeloma or [...] Read more.
Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant condition characterized by the presence of low levels of a monoclonal protein in the serum and a low percentage of clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. MGUS may progress to multiple myeloma or other plasma cell disorders at a rate of 1% annually. However, MGUS may also have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system independent of its malignant potential. Emerging data have shown that MGUS is associated with cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms underlying this association are not fully understood but may involve genetic abnormalities, vascular calcification, cryoglobulinemia, cold agglutinin disease, autoantibodies and the direct or indirect effects of the monoclonal protein on the vascular endothelium. Herein, we review current evidence in this field and we suggest that patients with MGUS may benefit from regular cardiovascular risk assessment to prevent severe cardiovascular complications, in parallel with close hematological follow-up to monitor potential disease progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Burden of Comorbidities on Cardiovascular System and Beyond)
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10 pages, 737 KiB  
Review
Role of Fibrinolysis in the Management of Patients with COVID-19 and Thromboembolic Complications: A Review
by Patrycja Zając, Karol Kaziród-Wolski, Izabela Oleś, Janusz Sielski and Zbigniew Siudak
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2022, 9(10), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd9100356 - 17 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1576
Abstract
An impaired fibrinolytic process has been demonstrated in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, including those in severe or critical condition. Disruption of fibrinolysis leads to fibrin deposition, which exacerbates inflammation and fibrosis and damages the pulmonary surfactant. Numerous authors point out the different course [...] Read more.
An impaired fibrinolytic process has been demonstrated in patients infected with SARS-CoV-2, including those in severe or critical condition. Disruption of fibrinolysis leads to fibrin deposition, which exacerbates inflammation and fibrosis and damages the pulmonary surfactant. Numerous authors point out the different course of coagulopathy in patients with COVID-19. It is reported that they may have a state of secondary hyperfibrinolysis, which may explain, at least in part, the increased incidence of venous thromboembolism, even among those patients already receiving appropriate anticoagulant treatment. This raises the question of whether current guidelines for the prevention and treatment of embolic–thrombotic complications, among patients with severe COVID-19, are sufficient. Some studies show evidence of clinical improvement in patients who have received fibrinolytic therapy, beyond the current indications for its implementation. However, when considering the inclusion of systemic fibrinolytic therapy, the benefits of such treatment should always be weighed over the risk of adverse effects. Thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry can be helpful in making such decisions. The purpose of this study was to review the current knowledge regarding fibrinolysis and its role in the treatment of patients with severe COVID-19, including those with thromboembolic complications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Burden of Comorbidities on Cardiovascular System and Beyond)
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