Risk Factors and Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Cardiac Surgery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2189

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jae Hwan Choi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
Interests: cardiothoracic surgery; outcomes research; mechanical circulatory support; heart transplantation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of cardiac surgery has seen remarkable development in the recent years, owing to new technological advancements providing room for improvement in surgical outcomes, at the expense of growing procedural complexities. As such, the role of research in identifying procedural outcomes as well as their related risk factors is proving to be more important than ever. Through these academic endeavors, we as surgeons are able to draw evidence-based conclusions regarding  surgical techniques, identify areas of improvement, as well as make apt clinical decisions to better serve our often feeble patient population. In this Special Issue of The Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease, we invite you to contribute your research on procedural outcomes and patient risk factors pertaining to cardiac surgery. We hope that this Special Issue will provide the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date view of the currently available surgical modalities, as well as provide a forum for in-depth discussions regarding their clinical implications.

Dr. Jae Hwan Choi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiac surgery
  • outcomes research
  • risk factor analysis
  • mechanical circulatory support
  • heart transplantation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1870 KiB  
Article
The Predictors and Outcomes of Functional Mitral Stenosis following Surgical Mitral Valve Repair: A Retrospective Analysis
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(11), 470; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10110470 - 19 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1238
Abstract
To optimize mitral valve repair outcomes, it is crucial to comprehend the predictors of functional mitral valve stenosis (FMS), to enhance preoperative assessments, and to adapt intraoperative treatment strategies. This study aimed to identify FMS risk factors, contributing valuable insights for refining surgical [...] Read more.
To optimize mitral valve repair outcomes, it is crucial to comprehend the predictors of functional mitral valve stenosis (FMS), to enhance preoperative assessments, and to adapt intraoperative treatment strategies. This study aimed to identify FMS risk factors, contributing valuable insights for refining surgical techniques. Among 228 selected patients, 215 underwent postoperative echocardiography follow-ups, and 36 met the FMS criteria based on a mean trans-mitral pressure gradient of >5 mmHg. Patients with FMS exhibited higher pulmonary systolic arterial pressure and increased late mortality during the follow-up. Univariable logistic regression analysis identified several risk factors for FMS, including end-stage renal disease, anterior leaflet lesion, concomitant aortic valve replacement, smaller ring size, ring type, and neochordae implantation. Conversely, resection alone and resection combined with neochordae implantation had protective effects against FMS. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that smaller ring sizes and patch repair independently predicted FMS. When focusing on degenerative mitral regurgitation, the neochordae implantation without resection in leaflet repair, emerged as an independent predictor of FMS. Surgeons should weigh the substantial impact of surgical procedures on postoperative trans-mitral pressure gradients, emphasizing preoperative evaluation and techniques such as precise ring size assessment and effective leaflet management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors and Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery)
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8 pages, 693 KiB  
Brief Report
Outcomes after Perioperative Transient Ischemic Attack Following Cardiac Surgery
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11010027 - 17 Jan 2024
Viewed by 693
Abstract
Perioperative transient ischemic attacks (PTIAs) are associated with significantly increased rates of postoperative complications such as low cardiac output, atrial fibrillation, and significantly higher mortality in cardiac procedures. The current literature on PTIAs is sparse and understudied. Therefore, we aim to understand the [...] Read more.
Perioperative transient ischemic attacks (PTIAs) are associated with significantly increased rates of postoperative complications such as low cardiac output, atrial fibrillation, and significantly higher mortality in cardiac procedures. The current literature on PTIAs is sparse and understudied. Therefore, we aim to understand the effects of PTIA on hospital utilization, readmission, and morbidity. Using data on all the cardiac procedures at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center from 2011 to 2019, fine and gray analysis was performed to identify whether PTIAs and covariables correlate with increased hospital utilization, stroke, all-cause readmission, Major Adverse Cardiac and Cerebrovascular Events (MACCE), MI, and all-cause mortality. Logistic regression for longer hospitalization showed that PTIA (HR: 2.199 [95% CI: 1.416–3.416] increased utilization rates. Fine and gray modeling indicated that PTIA (HR: 1.444 [95% CI: 1.096–1.902], p < 0.01) increased the rates of follow-up all-cause readmission. However, PTIA (HR: 1.643 [95% CI: 0.913–2.956] was not statistically significant for stroke readmission modeling. Multivariate modeling for MACCE events within 30 days of surgery (HR: 0.524 [95% CI: 0.171–1.605], p > 0.25) and anytime during the follow-up period (HR: 1.116 [95% CI: 0.825–1.509], p > 0.45) showed no significant correlation with PTIA. As a result of PTIA’s significant burden on the healthcare system due to increased utilization, it is critical to better define and recognize PTIA for timely management to improve perioperative outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors and Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery)
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