Epidemiological Research on Novel Cardiovascular Risk Factors

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology, Lifestyle, and Cardiovascular Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 6659

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Lab, Cyprus International Institute for Environmental and Public Health, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol 3036, Cyprus
Interests: arterial ageing; epidemiology of atherosclerosis; population health; social determinants of health; bioethics

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Co-Guest Editor
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Lab, Cyprus International Institute for Environmental and Public Health, Cyprus University of Technology, Limassol 3036, Cyprus
Interests: epidemiology; public health; microbiota; evidence based medicine; arterial stiffness

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A number of traditional risk factors for CVD, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and smoking, have been linked to CVD, with much of the research around the epidemiology of CVD focusing on these determinants. While these remain essential in both understanding the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and as targets for treatment, they do not fully explain all cardiovascular events. Epidemiological research that involves the measurement of traditional as well as novel risk factors may be necessary, while additionally shifting the focus from middle life to early life and childhood. As the prevalence of traditional CVD risk factors seems to increase in childhood, it is essential that both assessments of risk and pre-emptive interventions are implemented early in one’s life before the associated cardiovascular complications are established.

This Special Issue invites the submission of high-quality original research, including meta-analyses and reviews around novel risk factors for CVD in both patient and general populations (younger and older). We invite contributions related to, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • (Early) vascular ageing;
  • Cardiorenal syndrome;
  • Gut microbiome;
  • Use of imaging modalities;
  • Social and behavioral determinants of risk for CVD;
  • Environmental determinants of risk for CVD.

Dr. Andrie G. Panayiotou
Dr. Alexandros Hadjivasilis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vascular ageing
  • cardiorenal
  • microbiome
  • imaging
  • social determinants
  • environmental determinants
  • CVD

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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7 pages, 252 KiB  
Editorial
Heart Diseases of Uncertain Etiology: A New Definition of Heart Failure for Epidemiological Studies
by Paolo Emilio Puddu and Alessandro Menotti
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(3), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10030132 - 21 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1354
Abstract
It has been a long time since, in the spectrum of ischemic (IHD) or coronary (CHD) heart diseases, a differentiation was performed between the forms presenting with and those without pain [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiological Research on Novel Cardiovascular Risk Factors)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

11 pages, 1345 KiB  
Article
Developing a Questionnaire on Knowledge, Perceptions and Application of Vascular-Aging Measurements
by Areti Triantafyllou, Stavria-Artemis Elia, Chloe Park, Rachel E Climie, Christopher C. Mayer, Ioana Mozos, Giacomo Pucci, Thomas Weber and Andrie G. Panayiotou
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(2), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10020080 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2019
Abstract
Background: Vascular age (VA) is independent and chronological age for assessing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, tools for the implementation of VA are currently lacking. We aimed to develop a questionnaire to assess the current knowledge gaps related to VA and barriers to [...] Read more.
Background: Vascular age (VA) is independent and chronological age for assessing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. However, tools for the implementation of VA are currently lacking. We aimed to develop a questionnaire to assess the current knowledge gaps related to VA and barriers to its implementation in routine practice. Methods: Using a stepwise mixed-method approach, a quantitative questionnaire was constructed in four phases: (1) basic item generation and the development of a semi-qualitative questionnaire (SQQ); (2) dissemination to the VascAgeNet extended network and an analysis of the semi-qualitative questionnaire responses; (3) the development of a quantitative questionnaire (QQ); and (4) an assessment of the content and face validity and internal reliability in an additional sample. Results: Based on six main topics initially identified through an expert panel, a SQQ was developed and disseminated. Finally, a 22-item QQ was developed, with questions grouped around three main themes: knowledge of VA and its risk factors; perceptions and beliefs regarding the importance and contribution of VA to risk classification; and the application of VA measurements in clinical and research practice and its potential limitations (Cronbach’s alpha between 0.920 and 0.982 for all three categories). Conclusion: We report the development of a QQ on VA addressed to both clinicians and non-clinicians aiming to assess their knowledge, perceptions and application of VA measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiological Research on Novel Cardiovascular Risk Factors)
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16 pages, 1218 KiB  
Article
What Is the Smallest Change in Pulse Wave Velocity Measurements That Can Be Attributed to Clinical Changes in Arterial Stiffness with Certainty: A Randomized Cross-Over Study
by Mario Podrug, Borna Šunjić, Pjero Koren, Varja Đogaš, Ivana Mudnić, Mladen Boban and Ana Jerončić
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10020044 - 25 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2468
Abstract
Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a direct measure of arterial stiffness, is a promising biomarker of cardiovascular risk and a cardiovascular surrogate outcome. The resolution for detecting its smallest clinically significant change is dependent on the expected reproducibility, but there is currently no consensus [...] Read more.
Pulse wave velocity (PWV), a direct measure of arterial stiffness, is a promising biomarker of cardiovascular risk and a cardiovascular surrogate outcome. The resolution for detecting its smallest clinically significant change is dependent on the expected reproducibility, but there is currently no consensus on this. We estimated the PWV reproducibility in a range of intra-subject values that were observed over a 2 week period in a broad range of participants and under clinically relevant experimental conditions (two observers, morning/afternoon sessions, and number of visits) using SphygmoCor and Arteriograph devices. Each participant was recorded 12 times with each device over three visits, one week apart, and two morning and two afternoon recordings were taken per visit. The factors affecting reproducibility and the discrepancies between the consecutive PWV measurements for each device were also examined using multilevel mixed-effect models. We show that current PWV estimation guidance recommending 2 + 1 measurements is suboptimal because the PWV range was outside of the 1 m/s threshold for most of the participants, which is proposed as a minimal clinically important difference. The best reproducibility was yielded with median of four measurements and a 1.1 m/s threshold. Although PWV reproducibility and repeatability are frequently used interchangeably in studies, we demonstrated that despite their relative measures of variability (e.g., coefficient of variation) being comparable, their ranges revealed a clinically significant difference between them. We also found that different physiological variables were predictors of the discrepancy between the consecutive measurements made by the two devices, which is likely due to their distinct modes of operation. The evidence base for PWV reproducibility is limited, and more research is needed to deepen our understanding of the variation in arterial stiffness over time, as well as fluctuations within a population group and in an intervention setting. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epidemiological Research on Novel Cardiovascular Risk Factors)
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